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Past Events

  • The Unprecedented Jihadi Threat in Europe | 01/20/16 Jean-Pierre Filiu Following the largest attack on French soil since World War II, it is clear that Europe is facing its biggest threat of this generation. And with similarly deadly attacks in Turkey, active terror cells in Belgium, and credible threats in Germany and elsewhere in Europe, there is a critical need for continent-wide coordination to fight these militant groups. Just how much of a threat is ISIS to European society? How does the refugee crisis play in? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Winter is Coming: Why Vladimir Putin and the Enemies of the Free World Must be Stopped | 01/13/16 Garry Kasparov The growing rift between Russia and the West represents a conflict between modernity and the past, according to Garry Kasparov. For over a decade Kasparov has been an outspoken critic of Vladimir Putin's growing authoritarianism, but he has also been equally critical of the United States and its allies for their unwillingness to confront Moscow. What is the current state of the anti-Putin opposition? Can the West confront Russia without conflict? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Humans Need Not Apply: A Guide to Wealth and Work in the Age of Artificial Intelligence | 01/11/16 Jerry Kaplan After billions of dollars and 50 years of effort, researchers are finally cracking the code on artificial intelligence. Driverless cars, robotic helpers, and other technologies have the potential to usher in a new age of affluence and leisure--but the transition may be protracted and brutal unless we address the two great scourges of the modern developed world: volatile labor markets and income inequality. How can we prepare ourselves for an era of unprecedented change? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Back to the Future? Battlefield Nuclear Weapons in South Asia | 12/16/15 Jeffrey D. McCausland The nuclear threat looms large over South Asia. India and Pakistan are neighbors in a state of constant tension that has flared into violent confrontation on a number of occasions over a 70-year history. Both are nuclear weapons states, and neither is a signatory to the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), the flagship global nuclear arms control agreement. Pakistan's recent decision to develop "battlefield" or "tactical" (short-range) nuclear weapons ratchets up this tension further. Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Dr. Jeffrey D. McCausland, whose CV combines leadership in the U.S. military, the executive branch of government, and various academic posts, will offer an assessment of threats to the stability of the South Asia region and beyond. (U.S. Global Engagement Program)
  • Bearing Witness to War and Injustice: Ron Haviv, Photojournalist | 12/14/15 Ron Haviv In the last three decades, Ron Haviv has covered more than 25 conflicts and worked in over 100 countries. His work in the Balkans, which spanned over a decade of conflict, was used as evidence to indict and convict war criminals at the international tribunal in The Hague. On the 20th anniversary of the end of the Bosnian War, Haviv will discuss his life as a photojournalist and the crucial role that photos can play. (Ethics Matter Series)
  • Violence All Around | 12/10/15 John Sifton From al-Qaeda safe houses, to the Pentagon, to ordinary civilians and politicians, violence is everywhere. Yet, thinking and talking about it is troubling and confusing for most people. And with the "global war on terror" a ubiquitous part of American life for the last 14 years, stories about torture, detention centers, and drone warfare have complicated the topic even more. Will pure nonviolence ever be possible? Can human rights advocates shame the world into better behavior? (Public Affairs Program)
  • The State of the European Union: Challenges for the Future | 12/08/15 José Manuel Barroso With the Paris attacks, the refugee crisis, the continuing conflict in Ukraine, and the lingering euro crisis, it is an extraordinary time for the European Union. As president of the European Commission from 2004 to 2014, José Manuel Barroso has a firsthand understanding of these challenges and knows that there are no easy answers. What is the future of the European Union? How can the states manage these crises simultaneously? What is the role of the United States? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Sinai: Egypt's Linchpin, Gaza's Lifeline, Israel's Nightmare | 12/01/15 Mohannad Sabry Enclosed by the Suez Canal and bordering Gaza and Israel, Egypt's rugged Sinai Peninsula has been the cornerstone of the Egyptian-Israeli peace accords. Yet its internal politics and security have remained largely under media blackout, even as a rebellion shook the region in 2011. Now, with the crash of Russia's Metrojet Flight 9268 in October, the security and politics of Sinai are under international scrutiny. What is the effect of the region's instability on Israel and Palestine, the greater Middle East, and beyond? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Afghanistan and Pakistan: The Re-emergence of the Taliban and the Arrival of ISIS | 11/24/15 Ahmed Rashid NATO has officially ended its combat mission in Afghanistan, but the Taliban has launched a new offensive and ISIS is making inroads in the region as well. In conversation with Afghanistan expert Barnett Rubin, Ahmed Rashid, one of Pakistan's most respected journalists, will make sense of these developments and more. What is the reason for this terrifying resurgence? How are Afghans and Pakistanis reacting? (Public Affairs Program)
  • U.S.-Russian Conflict From Ukraine to Syria: Did U.S. Policy Contribute to It? | 11/23/15 Bill Bradley, Stephen F. Cohen, Jack F. Matlock, John Pepper, Yanni Kotsonis The NYU Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia presents a panel discussion organized by the American Committee for East-West Accord. The general purpose of the event is to discuss questions and perspectives often missing in the current public discourse about what some observers are calling a "New Cold War."
  • Perspectives from Inside a Tumultuous Middle East: Syria-Iraq-ISIS-Russia and Iran | 11/18/15 Rami Khouri With ongoing conflicts in Syria, Iraq, and Yemen, and dwindling hope for the peace process in Israel and Palestine, it is hard to remain hopeful about a peaceful future for the Middle East. Are there new ideas to end the cycle of violence? What can the West do? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Pacific: Silicon Chips and Surfboards, Coral Reefs and Atom Bombs, Brutal Dictators, Fading Empires, and the Coming Collision of the World's Superpowers | 11/16/15 Simon Winchester As the Mediterranean shaped the classical world, and the Atlantic connected Europe to the New World, the Pacific Ocean defines our tomorrow. From the Bering Strait to Cape Horn, the Yangtze River to the Panama Canal, what is our relationship with this imposing force of nature? What is its role in this century's geopolitical discussions? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Addressing Root Causes of Unrest in Arab Countries | 11/10/15 Ronald Bruder, Jasmine Nahhas di Florio Following the 9/11 attacks, Ronald Bruder, real estate developer and entrepreneur, established the Education For Employment Network, designed to provide unemployed youth in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) with market-driven training and job placements. Set up with in-country leadership in seven countries in MENA, EFE is dedicated to providing employment opportunities for young people. (U.S. Global Engagement Program)
  • The Global Refugee Crisis | 11/09/15 Tomáš Halík, Ian Buruma Hundreds of thousands of people are fleeing civil war and unrest to find new homes in Europe--sometimes with tragic consequences. Join Professors Tomáš Halík and Ian Buruma as they discuss the repercussions and longlasting effects of this extensive displacement of more people than at any time since World War II. (Public Affairs Program)
  • Impact Investing and Social Entrepreneurship in Tohoku, Japan | 11/06/15
    Learn about impact investing in Japan, particularly in the Tohoku region where numerous social ventures rose and have grown after the Great East-Japan Earthquake in 2011. This event is located at GLOBIS University in Tokyo, Japan.
  • Beyond Silicon Valley: A Conversation with Elmira Bayrasli on Innovation in Unlikely Places | 11/05/15 Elmira Bayrasli Elmira Bayrasli will discuss her new book, "From the Other Side of the World: Extraordinary Entrepreneurs, Unlikely Places," in conversation with social entrepreneur Hazami Barmada. The book looks at the growth of innovation beyond Silicon Valley, focusing on talented individuals around the world who have overcome insurmountable obstacles to lead high-growth businesses. (Ethics Matter Series)
  • Global Ethics Day | 10/16/15
    We invite academic institutions around the world to use this day to hold events, such as lectures, film screenings, debates, panel discussions, or another educational activity to explore the idea of a "global ethic." In the tradition of a "teach-in" model, these events will be run by each institution as it sees fit while being part of a worldwide Global Ethics Day.
  • Global Ethics Day: Feeding the Planet | 10/15/15 Gerald Bourke, Gilonne d'Origny, Jessica Fanzo A day before World Food Day and Global Ethics Day, Global Poverty Project and Carnegie Council will host a comprehensive discussion on innovative solutions and the role of the global community to end hunger. A reception among young professionals, activists, and others will follow the panel discussion.
  • Doomed to Succeed: The U.S.-Israel Relationship from Truman to Obama | 10/15/15 Dennis Ross When it comes to Israel, U.S. policy has always emphasized the unbreakable bond between the two countries. Today, America's ties to Israel are so close that when there are differences, they tend to make the news. But it was not always this way. From Truman to Obama, what are the tumultuous debates and events that drove the policies and at times led to a shift in approach? Even though it has never yielded any benefits, why have several presidential administrations tried to distance the United States from Israel? (Public Affairs Program)
  • ISIS: Inside the Army of Terror | 10/06/15 Michael Weiss With brutal force and horrific beheadings of hostages, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) has shocked the world. It has conquered territory equal to the size of Great Britain--and promises to create a new Muslim caliphate under the strict dictates of Sharia law. How does ISIS recruit its jihadi army of international volunteers? Where do the key players, like elusive leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, come from? And how has the movement attracted global support and financing? (Public Affairs Program)
  • A Conversation with Karenna Gore on Ethics and our Ecological Crisis | 10/01/15 Karenna Gore Karenna Gore and the Center for Earth Ethics (CEE) see our ecological crisis as the consequence of a deeper malady: the dominant economic development agenda that results in the exploitation of people and nature for short-term and inequitable financial gain. So for real change to occur, a new paradigm based on the sustained well-being of all people and our planet must materialize. How are Gore and the CEE working to make this happen? What is the role of spiritual, indigenous, and religious communities? (Ethics Matter Series)
  • Pope Francis Among the Wolves: The Inside Story of a Revolution | 09/30/15 Marco Politi There's no doubt that Pope Francis has changed the tone of the papacy. He's accessible and energetic, where his predecessor seemed reclusive and tired. But in becoming the face of change, Francis has also raised the expectation of change. Will Pope Francis succeed in overcoming his opponents and save the faith from decline? (Public Affairs Program)
  • NATO in the 21st Century: Addressing New and Urgent Challenges | 09/28/15 Douglas E. Lute As recent events indicate, Russia sees NATO as the top threat to Russian interests and has called for increased investment of its naval forces in the Black Sea; Turkey is under siege by ISIS; Libya is unstable; and extremism in Iraq and Syria is on the rise. How will NATO address Russian aggression in Ukraine and in the Baltic Sea? Will NATO also be drawn into the Middle East conflict? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Is the Eurozone Crisis Over? | 09/18/15 Martin Wolf The eurozone economy is at last beginning to recover, including the crisis-hit countries, except for Greece. But all of the countries have suffered at least a lost decade. Are they now securely on the mend? Is the new Greek program going to work? Has the eurozone been adequately reformed? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Carnegie Council Co-sponsors International New York Times Athens Democracy Forum in Athens, Greece | 09/13/15
    Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs is proud to be a co-sponsor of this important "International New York Times" Forum. Coinciding with UN International Democracy Day, the Athens Democracy Forum will convene diplomats, scholars, corporate executives, politicians, government ministers, experts, and journalists from around the world. Together, at the ancient Agora--the birthplace of democracy--we will explore the state of liberal democracies and the major challenges they face in the world today.
  • Russia's Soft Power: A Matter for Church and State | 09/10/15 Nikolas K. Gvosdev, Nadieszda Kizenko, Nicolai N. Petro In the current frigid environment of U.S.-Russia relations, there is much debate over Russia’s legitimate strategic interests. Of equal importance for understanding Russian attitudes is a grasp of the values, the moral framework for her foreign policy. Three leading experts on Russia's "soft power" will explain the roles of the state and the Russian Orthodox Church in formulating this framework of values. (U.S. Global Engagement Program)
  • HDCA Conference: Capabilities on the Move: Mobility and Aspirations | 09/10/15 Deen Chatterjee, Lyn Boyd-Judson, Cheyney C. Ryan The 2015 Human Development & Capability Association Program Committee cordially invites scholars, government policy makers, practitioners, and other interested parties from all over the world to participate in this conference, which is co-sponsored by Carnegie Council.
  • The Republic of Conscience | 06/30/15 Gary Hart America is nowhere near the republic it set out to be at its founding, falling to the very misconduct it hoped to avoid. How has America's sense of national interest become distorted and diluted? How have the military, the CIA, and Congress led the country away from its founding principles? Is there hope for Americans who feel jaded, confused, and disappointed by their own government? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Ethical Leadership: A Conversation with Chuck Hagel | 06/18/15 Chuck Hagel From a highly decorated stint serving in the U.S Army during the Vietnam War, to a successful business career running multiple companies in different industries, to two high-profile terms in the Senate, and culminating with a tenure as the secretary of defense, the one constant in Chuck Hagel's varied and pressure-filled career has been ethical leadership. How have his experiences--in war, the boardroom, and Congress--shaped his leadership style? (U.S. Global Engagement Program)
  • A Conversation with Ashoka Founder Bill Drayton on Social Entrepreneurship | 06/11/15 Bill Drayton "The life purpose of the true social entrepreneur is to change the world," says Bill Drayton. "[H]e or she simply cannot come to rest in life until his or her vision has become the new pattern society-wide." What is a social entrepreneur? Conventional entrepreneurs typically measure performance in profit and return, but social entrepreneurs also take into account a positive return to society. The term was first popularized by Bill Drayton, who founded Ashoka in 1980. Today, Ashoka is the largest network of social entrepreneurs worldwide, with close to 3,000 Ashoka Fellows in 70 countries. (Ethics Matter Series)
  • Agenda for the Future: Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCR) | 06/08/15 Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein With wars throughout the Middle East, terror threats in Africa, and challenges for minority groups and immigrants in Europe and the Americas, it is a particularly fraught time for Jordan's Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein, the United Nations high commissioner for human rights. How is his office dealing with these myriad threats? What is their agenda for the future? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Global Ethics Conference, Tokyo, Japan | 06/05/15
    International Christian University and Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs are organizing a collaborative symposium on Global Ethics. This event is held as a part of Global Ethical Dialogues, which is the world-wide project led by Carnegie's Centennial Chair Michael Ignatieff. The main theme for the symposium is "Global Ethics: Nuclear Energy, Technology and Risk."
  • Uehiro Lecture: Michael Ignatieff Explores "Technology and Risk: Learning from the Japanese Experience” | 06/04/15 Michael Ignatieff In a globalized world, all nations face a common moral challenge: how to foresee, prevent, and if prediction and prevention fail, how to manage the catastrophic risks presented by new technologies. Japan has had to think hard about this challenge in the wake of Fukushima. What can other nations learn from Japan's painful experience? Is the preventive principle--"first do no harm"--a sufficient guide for policy?
  • A Conversation with Ethan Zuckerman on the Ethics of the Internet | 06/03/15 Ethan Zuckerman "I'd really like to see us get globalization right. For me, getting globalization right wouldn't mean that we have stuff from every corner of the world, but would mean that we have people and ideas and opportunities and solutions from every corner of the world." What is the role of technology and digital media in the ongoing globalization process? How can they connect the world in more ethical and inclusive ways? (Ethics Matter Series)
  • A Dangerous Master: How to Keep Technology from Slipping Beyond Our Control | 06/02/15 Wendell Wallach From combat drones to nanotechnology, 3-D printers to synthetic organisms, our most recent inventions increasingly defy the norms for acceptable uses of technology. Who should be held accountable when machines break or people die? What responsibility do we, as creators and users, have for our technologies? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Ethics in U.S. Foreign Policy: Spymaster Jack Devine on the CIA | 05/26/15 Jack Devine During his distinguished 32-year career in the CIA, Jack Devine headed many of the Agency's most important, dramatic, and successful operations. He argues that covert operations, not costly and devastating full-scale interventions, are the best safeguard of America's interests worldwide. (Ethics Matter Series)
  • Crisis in Yemen: Instability on the Arabian Peninsula | 05/20/15 Bernard Haykel The crisis in Yemen continues to worsen, pitting the Saudi-led Gulf countries against Shiite rival Iran--with the U.S. supporting the Saudi coalition. How can this dire situation be resolved? What does this conflict mean long-term for the Middle East and, indeed, the United States? (Public Affairs Program)
  • The UN's Efforts in International Development: Relevant or Not? | 05/12/15 David M. Malone The United Nations is undertaking a herculean effort to produce a new generation of sustainable development goals, to be formally agreed upon at a summit this coming September. With underwhelming results so far, is the UN the right place for international development? How does December's Climate Summit in Paris fit in with this effort? (Public Affairs Program)
  • From Nuclear Deterrence to Disarmament: Evolving Catholic Perspectives | 05/07/15 Bernardito C. Auza, Des Browne, J. Bryan Hehir, Maryann Cusimano Love, Gerard F. Powers In collaboration with the Kroc Institute, this discussion will address the policy, religious, and ethical implications of nuclear capabilities. This event is especially timely since it coincides with the Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference and reflects on the major statements issued by the Holy See at the Vienna Conference about nuclear weapons last December. (U.S. Global Engagement Program)
  • Headscarves and Hymens: Why the Middle East Needs a Sexual Revolution | 05/06/15 Mona Eltahawy, Naureen Chowdhury Fink Since the beginning of the Arab Spring, women in the Arab world have had two revolutions to undertake: one fought with men against oppressive regimes, and another fought against an entire political and economic system that treats women as second-class citizens. What can we do to work for equal rights for women in the Arab world? Why is it so hard to substantively fight against misogyny in North Africa and the Middle East? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Full Planet, Empty Plates | 05/04/15 Lester R. Brown "In this era of tightening world food supplies, the ability to grow food is fast becoming a new form of geopolitical leverage. Food is the new oil," says Lester R. Brown. What will the geopolitics of food look like in a new era dominated by scarcity and food nationalism? (Public Affairs Program)
  • The Ethics Police?: The Struggle to Make Human Research Safe | 04/28/15 Robert L. Klitzman Research on human beings saves countless lives, but has at times harmed the participants. Although in 1974, the U.S. government established Institutional Review Boards to oversee research on humans, ethics violations persist. To what extent should government regulate science and how? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Conference on Democracy and Values | 04/25/15
    This international conference is co-hosted by Carnegie Council and Global Thinkers Forum. A select delegation of high-profile scholars and ethical visionaries, including senior Carnegie Council staff, will participate in an intensive, multi-phased dialogue with Greek academics, public officials, business leaders, activists, students, and citizens. They will pursue ethical questions that lie at the heart of the Greek tradition of democracy and develop a new understanding of global citizenship that transcends national borders.
  • Defending our Borders vs. Defending our Liberties: ACLU's Anthony D. Romero | 04/23/15 Anthony D. Romero Anthony D. Romero has been the executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) during a period when American civil liberties have been threatened as they have not been since the early days of the Cold War. Under his leadership, the ACLU has taken a lead role in challenging the Patriot Act and the NSA's surveillance program. Romero will talk about Edward Snowden, drones, the U.S. "Kill List," and the balance that must be struck between defending our borders and defending our liberties. (Ethics Matter Series)
  • Blueprint for Revolution: How to Use Rice Pudding, Lego Men, and Other Nonviolent Techniques to Galvanize Communities, Overthrow Dictators, or Simply Change the World | 04/22/15 Srdja Popovic, Tina Rosenberg Although current events indicate otherwise, revolutions don't have to be violent. How can you master the art of compromise to bring together even the most disparate groups? What are some ways you can make oppression backfire by playing your opponents' strongest card against them? How can you use humor to make yourself heard? (Public Affairs Program)
  • The Crisis of Europe's Muslims | 04/13/15 Juan Cole "Al-Qaeda wants to mentally colonize French Muslims, but faces a wall of disinterest. But if it can get non-Muslim French to be beastly to ethnic Muslims on the grounds that they are Muslims, it can start creating a common political identity around grievance against discrimination." So wrote Professor Juan Cole, an expert on Islamic and Western relations, in a recent article. He will discuss effective methods to thwart al-Qaeda's manipulative tactics. (U.S. Global Engagement Program)
  • The Paradox of Liberation | 04/07/15 Michael Walzer Many of the successful campaigns for national liberation in the years following World War II were initially based on democratic and secular ideals. Once established, however, the newly independent nations had to deal with entirely unexpected religious fierceness. This trend is clearly evident in India, Israel, and Algeria, three nations whose founding principles have been sharply attacked by three different groups of religious revivalists: Hindu militants, ultra-Orthodox Jews and messianic Zionists, and Islamic radicals, respectively. Why have these states and others been unable to reproduce their political culture beyond one or two generations? (Public Affairs Program)
  • P5 + 1 + Iran: Report on Results from Geneva | 04/02/15 Seyed Hossein Mousavian Ambassador Mousavian will report on the outcome and consequences of the latest round of negotiations on the Iranian nuclear program that concluded on March 31, 2015. (U.S. Global Engagement)
  • American Energy Challenges and Global Leadership in the Years Ahead | 03/31/15 Helima Croft, John M. Deutch, David Gordon, Marc Lipschultz, Elizabeth Rosenberg Dramatic changes in the global energy system pose hard choices for U.S. interests and values. What are the leadership responsibilities of the United States in the changing energy market? How extensively can the United States involve itself in policy initiatives to promote market stability? What are the ethical challenges of U.S. action (or inaction)? (American Leadership Series)
  • The Eleventh Hour: The Legacy and the Lessons of World War I | 03/19/15 Charles M. Sennott One hundred years after the First World War, boundaries established after the armistice at the "eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month" still shape many of today's conflicts. Charles Sennott is founder and executive director of The GroundTruth Project. From ISIS's invasion of Mosul to Boko Haram's kidnapping of schoolgirls, Sennott journeys from Iraq to Nigeria to the Balkans to Northern Ireland and the Holy Land to see how WWI's history lives on and the lessons learned—and far too often not learned. (Public Affairs Program)
  • The Kurdish Spring: A New Map of the Middle East | 03/18/15 David L. Phillips With 32 million Kurds in "Kurdistan," which includes parts of Iran, Iraq, Syria, and Turkey, the Kurds are the largest stateless people in the world. And with chemical weapon attacks from Saddam Hussein in 1988 as the most glaring example, they have faced prosecution and repression in each of these states. In recent years, though, the Kurds have evolved from a victimized people into a coherent political community. What is the cause of this transformation? In the face of Islamic extremism, how do the Kurds help to advance U.S. strategic and security interests in the region? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Womenomics: An Economic and Social Roadmap for Japan | 03/16/15
    Expanding opportunities for women to join Japan's workforce is a centerpiece of the "Abenomics" economic revival strategy proposed by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. In fact, it has its own name: "Womenomics." Can Japan unleash the economic power of women to revitalize its economy? How large might the "Womenomics" dividend be?
  • Nigeria and the Horror of Boko Haram | 03/03/15 John Campbell When it comes to Islamic extremist groups, ISIS, the Taliban, and al-Qaeda are the main focus of the Western media and the U.S. State Department. But Boko Haram, it can be argued, is just as big a threat to global stability as it continues to terrorize a large swath of Nigeria, Africa's richest and most populous state. Why has the American media and military seemingly ignored this brutal war? Why does Boko Haram act with impunity in Northern Nigeria? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Patients with Passports: Medical Tourism, Law, and Ethics | 02/24/15 I. Glenn Cohen, Robert L. Klitzman Medical tourism is a growing, multi-billion dollar industry involving millions of patients who travel abroad each year to get health care. Some seek services like hip replacements and travel to avoid queues, save money, or because their insurer has given them an incentive to do so. Others seek to circumvent prohibitions on accessing services at home and go abroad to receive abortions, assisted suicide, commercial surrogacy, or experimental stem cell treatments. How safe are these procedures? How do you ensure that you will be protected if anything should happen? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Ebola and Other Viral Outbreaks: Providing Health Care to the Global Poor in Times of Crisis | 02/13/15 Unni Karunakara, Robert L. Klitzman Providing health care to people in crisis is challenging, as the recent Ebola crisis has shown. Responding professionally to increasingly complex needs while retaining the humanitarian spirit that responds to unacceptable human suffering is a major challenge facing all aid agencies. Over the past few decades, the humanitarian sector has attempted to create global standards, but what happens when governments fail to provide adequate medical services for their populations? (Public Affairs Program)
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