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Past Events

  • The Needs of Refugee Women and Children in the Global Humanitarian Crisis | 06/21/16 Sarah Costa Lost in the rhetoric and the xenophobia that has arisen due to the ongoing refugee crisis are the stories of millions of women and children fleeing war and persecution for an uncertain future. The Women's Refugee Commission, founded in 1989, advocates vigorously for laws, policies, and programs to improve the lives and protect the rights of refugee and internally displaced women, children, and young people, including those seeking asylum--bringing about lasting, measurable change. (Public Affairs Program)
  • Time to Wake Up | 06/17/16 Sheldon Whitehouse Rhode Island's Senator Sheldon Whitehouse has given over 130 speeches on the floor of the U.S. Senate on one theme: It is time for Congress to wake up to the disaster of climate change and look for tangible ways to reduce greenhouse gases and protect vulnerable communities. Who are Sen. Whitehouse's allies in this fight? What can concerned citizens do? And with a new president taking office in 2017, what is the future of environmental legislation? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Move Over, Black Swan: Here Comes the Gray Rhino | 06/14/16 Michele Wucker While the sheer size of the 2008 financial crisis may have been an unforeseeable "black swan," the market speculation and imbalances behind it were not. Each of the underlying causes--the housing bubble, problems with credit default swaps, and poor risk management--was a highly obvious threat: that is, a "gray rhino." Why do policy and business leaders consistently fail to deal with imminent crises in time to prevent widespread damage? (Carnegie New Leaders)
  • The Invention of Russia: The Journey from Gorbachev's Freedom to Putin's War | 06/09/16 Arkady Ostrovsky The end of communism and the breakup of the Soviet Union was a time of euphoria around the world. It was hoped that this new Russia would be more open and more democratic. How did we go from the promise of these heady days to a Russia that has given cause for concern in the West? Arkady Ostrovksy, a native son, introduces us to those who have been responsible for the course of the events since the collapse of the Soviet Union. (Public Affairs Program)
  • The Next Pandemic: On the Front Lines Against Humankind's Gravest Dangers | 05/25/16 Ali S. Khan In more than 20 years at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr. Ali S. Khan found that rogue microbes will always be a problem, but outbreaks are often caused by people. We make mistakes, politicize emergencies, and, too often, fail to imagine the consequences of our actions. With the Zika virus as the newest threat, are we prepared for the next pandemic? What can we learn from Ebola, SARS, and other modern outbreaks? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Return to Cold War | 05/23/16 Robert H. Legvold Does the current crisis in U.S.-Russia relations match the depth and scale of the contest that dominated the international system in the second half of the 20th century? What caused the initial success, notably in arms control agreements such as New START, to go awry? How might momentum toward a more positive U.S.-Russian relationship be regained? Robert Legvold will answer these questions and more. (U.S. Global Engagement Program)
  • Threats and Opportunities on the Korean Peninsula | 05/17/16 Gheewhan Kim, Scott A. Snyder, Sue Mi Terry South Korea has one of the world's largest economies, a dynamic culture that sets trends all over the world, and an increasingly important geopolitical presence on the world stage. But above the 39th parallel, North Korea is as isolated, oppressive, and dangerous as ever. Should the United States and its East Asian allies be worried about this new round of nuclear threats from Pyongyang? Are negotiations possible with Kim Jong-un? What's China's role? And what is the real political effect of the North Korean menace on Seoul? (Public Affairs Program)
  • ISIS: The Caliphate at Two | 05/12/16 Michael Weiss The Caliphate declared by ISIS is now two years old. What makes ISIS so seemingly successful and what are its goals? How has ISIS spread so effectively to other regions? What can the U.S. and others do to stem the tide? In conversation with James Ketterer, dean of international studies at Bard College, Mr. Weiss will discuss the current situation with ISIS, the ongoing conflicts in Syria and Iraq, and the broader regional and international implications. (Ethics Matter Series)
  • A Rage for Order: The Middle East in Turmoil, from Tahrir Square to ISIS | 05/10/16 Robert F. Worth In 2011, a generation of young Arabs, from Egypt to Yemen, insisted on a new ethos of common citizenship. Five years later, their utopian aspirations have taken on a darker cast as old divides reemerge and deepen. But lost among the talk of dictators, foreign intervention, and terrorists, is the plight of the average citizens of these countries. What are their stories? How do they see their future after years of discord? (Public Affairs Program)
  • The Last Supper: The Plight of Christians in Arab Lands | 04/27/16 Klaus Wivel There are 7.5 million Christians in the Middle East, who live under constant threat of death and humiliation. They are increasingly desperate in the face of rising Islamic extremism and their only hope for survival may be fleeing into exile. Why have we not done more to protect this beleaguered minority? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Ethics and Economics of Global Justice | 04/22/16 Amartya Sen One of the foremost public intellectuals of our time, Professor Amartya Sen has informed and challenged the world on the ethical, global, and policy dimensions of a wide range of issues such as democracy, human rights, poverty, violence, gender, human development, and war and peace. Presented by Daniels Fund Ethics Initiative, Carnegie Council, and the University of Utah, this lecture will be at the University of Utah.
  • Islamism: What It Means for the Middle East and the World | 04/20/16 Tarek Osman A political, social, and cultural battle is currently raging in the Middle East. On one side are the Islamists, those who believe Islam should be the region's primary identity. In opposition are nationalists, secularists, royal families, military establishments, and others who view Islamism as a serious threat. How have Islamists been able to win elections? What does their rise mean for the future of the region and the world? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Eurasianism and the European Far Right: Book Launch and Update on Events in Europe | 04/12/16 Péter Krekó, Marlene Laruelle, Daniel Stein The publication of "Eurasianism and the European Far Right," edited by Marlene Laruelle, is the culmination of an intensive two-year project spearheaded by the Council's U.S. Global Engagement Program. Examining the European far right's connections with Russia, this initiative traces the ideological origins and individual paths that have materialized in this permanent dialogue between Russia and Europe. (U.S. Global Engagement Program)
  • The Geopolitics of the Iran Deal: Winners and Losers | 04/07/16 Karim Sadjadpour The Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action has provoked strong reactions throughout the world. In the United States, some see it as the Obama administration's signature foreign policy achievement, while others argue that it will prop up a terrorist regime. And in the Middle East, Iranians are exuberant at the economic relief, but Saudis worry that their rivals now have the geopolitical edge. Who are the real winners and losers in the Iran deal? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Learning from the West African Ebola Epidemic: The Role of Governance in Preventing Epidemics | 03/31/16 Michael T. Osterholm, Andrew C. Weber Co-sponsored by Bard College's Hannah Arendt Center, Citizen Science, CCE, and the Ford Foundation in collaboration with the Honorable Dr. Wilmot James, South African MP, and Carnegie Council, this conference will explore the hypothesis that building public trust in effective organizations is essential for fighting health crises such as Ebola. Social science and political actors, along with leading scientists and Ebola specialists, will examine the Ebola epidemic and its consequences as a case study to explore how educational, governance, and health care resources can be better deployed against future outbreaks.
  • Refugees on Turkey's Borders: Consequences of Chaos in Syria | 03/28/16 Kemal Kirişci Violence in Syria has displaced more than half of its population. More than 4.5 million refugees have fled into neighboring countries with an additional half a million making their way to Europe. What is the impact on Turkey? How can these refugees be protected? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Blood Year: The Unraveling of Western Counterterrorism | 03/22/16 David Kilcullen David Kilcullen is one of the world's leading theorists of counterinsurgency. As a soldier, counterterrorism official, and chief strategist in the U.S. State Department's Bureau of Counterterrorism, he was one of the key designers of U.S. and allied counterterrorism policy. Now, in a self-critical analysis of the collapse of Western counterterrorism strategy, "Blood Year" challenges all sides in the contentious debate over America's role in the Middle East and the world. How did we end up in such dire circumstances? Can the United States find a new way forward? (Public Affairs Program)
  • The Industries of the Future | 03/07/16 Alec Ross From robotics, to cybersecurity, to the coming impact of digital technology on money and markets, the next 10 years will be full of advances and stumbling blocks that will affect our economic future. How will we adapt to the changing nature of work? Is the prospect of cyberwar sparking the next arms race? (Public Affairs Program)
  • A Conversation with Sarah Chayes on Corruption and Global Security | 03/01/16 Sarah Chayes What is the common thread linking crises around the world, from Syria to Nigeria? According to Sarah Chayes, the answer is simple: corruption. Since the late 1990s, corruption has reached such an extent that some governments resemble glorified criminal gangs, bent solely on their own enrichment. Chayes spent seven eventful years in Afghanistan, where she grappled with corruption on many levels. Today she is a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. She is the author of "Thieves of State: Why Corruption Threatens Global Security." (Ethics Matter)
  • The Refugee/Migrant Crisis | 02/26/16 Peter Sutherland The influx of refugees from the Middle East and Africa into Europe continues to rise. Bitter divisions among member states have jeopardized the Schengen Area of borderless travel within the EU. Populists are having a field day. Do we have a moral responsibility to help these migrants? How can we maximize the benefits of migration and minimize potentially negative impacts? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Beyond a New Cold War? International Security and the Need for U.S.-Russia Cooperation | 02/17/16 Stephen F. Cohen, Jack F. Matlock, John Pepper, William vanden Heuvel The American Committee for East-West Accord (ACEWA) is a nonpartisan organization of prominent U.S. citizens from business, the academy, government service, science, law, and other fields dedicated to the proposition that no real or lasting American, European, or global security is achievable without essential and stable cooperation with Russia. Founding board members of ACEWA will speak to these challenges and opportunities. (U.S. Global Engagement Program)
  • What Went Wrong in the Arab Spring? | 02/10/16 Adam Roberts With civil resistance at the heart of the massive demonstrations, the early days of the Arab Spring produced some notable victories, including the fall of authoritarian governments in Tunisia, Egypt, Libya, and Yemen. Yet these apparent triumphs of non-violent action were followed by disasters. What went wrong? Was the problem the methods, leadership, and aims of the popular movements, or the conditions of their societies? (Public Affairs Program)
  • In Europe's Shadow: Two Cold Wars and a Thirty-Year Journey Through Romania and Beyond | 02/09/16 Robert D. Kaplan "In Europe's Shadow" is the story of an ideological and geographic frontier. As a pivotal frontier country, Romania is a metaphor for how Europe must confront a resurgent Russia—and this is the book you must read in order to truly understand the crisis with Russia, Ukraine, and within Europe itself. (Public Affairs Program)
  • The Unprecedented Jihadi Threat in Europe | 01/20/16 Jean-Pierre Filiu Following the largest attack on French soil since World War II, it is clear that Europe is facing its biggest threat of this generation. And with similarly deadly attacks in Turkey, active terror cells in Belgium, and credible threats in Germany and elsewhere in Europe, there is a critical need for continent-wide coordination to fight these militant groups. Just how much of a threat is ISIS to European society? How does the refugee crisis play in? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Winter is Coming: Why Vladimir Putin and the Enemies of the Free World Must be Stopped | 01/13/16 Garry Kasparov The growing rift between Russia and the West represents a conflict between modernity and the past, according to Garry Kasparov. For over a decade Kasparov has been an outspoken critic of Vladimir Putin's growing authoritarianism, but he has also been equally critical of the United States and its allies for their unwillingness to confront Moscow. What is the current state of the anti-Putin opposition? Can the West confront Russia without conflict? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Humans Need Not Apply: A Guide to Wealth and Work in the Age of Artificial Intelligence | 01/11/16 Jerry Kaplan After billions of dollars and 50 years of effort, researchers are finally cracking the code on artificial intelligence. Driverless cars, robotic helpers, and other technologies have the potential to usher in a new age of affluence and leisure--but the transition may be protracted and brutal unless we address the two great scourges of the modern developed world: volatile labor markets and income inequality. How can we prepare ourselves for an era of unprecedented change? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Back to the Future? Battlefield Nuclear Weapons in South Asia | 12/16/15 Jeffrey D. McCausland The nuclear threat looms large over South Asia. India and Pakistan are neighbors in a state of constant tension that has flared into violent confrontation on a number of occasions over a 70-year history. Both are nuclear weapons states, and neither is a signatory to the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), the flagship global nuclear arms control agreement. Pakistan's recent decision to develop "battlefield" or "tactical" (short-range) nuclear weapons ratchets up this tension further. Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Dr. Jeffrey D. McCausland, whose CV combines leadership in the U.S. military, the executive branch of government, and various academic posts, will offer an assessment of threats to the stability of the South Asia region and beyond. (U.S. Global Engagement Program)
  • Bearing Witness to War and Injustice: Ron Haviv, Photojournalist | 12/14/15 Ron Haviv In the last three decades, Ron Haviv has covered more than 25 conflicts and worked in over 100 countries. His work in the Balkans, which spanned over a decade of conflict, was used as evidence to indict and convict war criminals at the international tribunal in The Hague. On the 20th anniversary of the end of the Bosnian War, Haviv will discuss his life as a photojournalist and the crucial role that photos can play. (Ethics Matter Series)
  • Violence All Around | 12/10/15 John Sifton From al-Qaeda safe houses, to the Pentagon, to ordinary civilians and politicians, violence is everywhere. Yet, thinking and talking about it is troubling and confusing for most people. And with the "global war on terror" a ubiquitous part of American life for the last 14 years, stories about torture, detention centers, and drone warfare have complicated the topic even more. Will pure nonviolence ever be possible? Can human rights advocates shame the world into better behavior? (Public Affairs Program)
  • The State of the European Union: Challenges for the Future | 12/08/15 José Manuel Barroso With the Paris attacks, the refugee crisis, the continuing conflict in Ukraine, and the lingering euro crisis, it is an extraordinary time for the European Union. As president of the European Commission from 2004 to 2014, José Manuel Barroso has a firsthand understanding of these challenges and knows that there are no easy answers. What is the future of the European Union? How can the states manage these crises simultaneously? What is the role of the United States? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Sinai: Egypt's Linchpin, Gaza's Lifeline, Israel's Nightmare | 12/01/15 Mohannad Sabry Enclosed by the Suez Canal and bordering Gaza and Israel, Egypt's rugged Sinai Peninsula has been the cornerstone of the Egyptian-Israeli peace accords. Yet its internal politics and security have remained largely under media blackout, even as a rebellion shook the region in 2011. Now, with the crash of Russia's Metrojet Flight 9268 in October, the security and politics of Sinai are under international scrutiny. What is the effect of the region's instability on Israel and Palestine, the greater Middle East, and beyond? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Afghanistan and Pakistan: The Re-emergence of the Taliban and the Arrival of ISIS | 11/24/15 Ahmed Rashid NATO has officially ended its combat mission in Afghanistan, but the Taliban has launched a new offensive and ISIS is making inroads in the region as well. In conversation with Afghanistan expert Barnett Rubin, Ahmed Rashid, one of Pakistan's most respected journalists, will make sense of these developments and more. What is the reason for this terrifying resurgence? How are Afghans and Pakistanis reacting? (Public Affairs Program)
  • U.S.-Russian Conflict From Ukraine to Syria: Did U.S. Policy Contribute to It? | 11/23/15 Bill Bradley, Stephen F. Cohen, Jack F. Matlock, John Pepper, Yanni Kotsonis The NYU Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia presents a panel discussion organized by the American Committee for East-West Accord. The general purpose of the event is to discuss questions and perspectives often missing in the current public discourse about what some observers are calling a "New Cold War."
  • Perspectives from Inside a Tumultuous Middle East: Syria-Iraq-ISIS-Russia and Iran | 11/18/15 Rami Khouri With ongoing conflicts in Syria, Iraq, and Yemen, and dwindling hope for the peace process in Israel and Palestine, it is hard to remain hopeful about a peaceful future for the Middle East. Are there new ideas to end the cycle of violence? What can the West do? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Pacific: Silicon Chips and Surfboards, Coral Reefs and Atom Bombs, Brutal Dictators, Fading Empires, and the Coming Collision of the World's Superpowers | 11/16/15 Simon Winchester As the Mediterranean shaped the classical world, and the Atlantic connected Europe to the New World, the Pacific Ocean defines our tomorrow. From the Bering Strait to Cape Horn, the Yangtze River to the Panama Canal, what is our relationship with this imposing force of nature? What is its role in this century's geopolitical discussions? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Addressing Root Causes of Unrest in Arab Countries | 11/10/15 Ronald Bruder, Jasmine Nahhas di Florio Following the 9/11 attacks, Ronald Bruder, real estate developer and entrepreneur, established the Education For Employment Network, designed to provide unemployed youth in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) with market-driven training and job placements. Set up with in-country leadership in seven countries in MENA, EFE is dedicated to providing employment opportunities for young people. (U.S. Global Engagement Program)
  • The Global Refugee Crisis | 11/09/15 Tomáš Halík, Ian Buruma Hundreds of thousands of people are fleeing civil war and unrest to find new homes in Europe--sometimes with tragic consequences. Join Professors Tomáš Halík and Ian Buruma as they discuss the repercussions and longlasting effects of this extensive displacement of more people than at any time since World War II. (Public Affairs Program)
  • Impact Investing and Social Entrepreneurship in Tohoku, Japan | 11/06/15
    Learn about impact investing in Japan, particularly in the Tohoku region where numerous social ventures rose and have grown after the Great East-Japan Earthquake in 2011. This event is located at GLOBIS University in Tokyo, Japan.
  • Beyond Silicon Valley: A Conversation with Elmira Bayrasli on Innovation in Unlikely Places | 11/05/15 Elmira Bayrasli Elmira Bayrasli will discuss her new book, "From the Other Side of the World: Extraordinary Entrepreneurs, Unlikely Places," in conversation with social entrepreneur Hazami Barmada. The book looks at the growth of innovation beyond Silicon Valley, focusing on talented individuals around the world who have overcome insurmountable obstacles to lead high-growth businesses. (Ethics Matter Series)
  • Global Ethics Day | 10/16/15
    We invite academic institutions around the world to use this day to hold events, such as lectures, film screenings, debates, panel discussions, or another educational activity to explore the idea of a "global ethic." In the tradition of a "teach-in" model, these events will be run by each institution as it sees fit while being part of a worldwide Global Ethics Day.
  • Global Ethics Day: Feeding the Planet | 10/15/15 Gerald Bourke, Gilonne d'Origny, Jessica Fanzo A day before World Food Day and Global Ethics Day, Global Poverty Project and Carnegie Council will host a comprehensive discussion on innovative solutions and the role of the global community to end hunger. A reception among young professionals, activists, and others will follow the panel discussion.
  • Doomed to Succeed: The U.S.-Israel Relationship from Truman to Obama | 10/15/15 Dennis Ross When it comes to Israel, U.S. policy has always emphasized the unbreakable bond between the two countries. Today, America's ties to Israel are so close that when there are differences, they tend to make the news. But it was not always this way. From Truman to Obama, what are the tumultuous debates and events that drove the policies and at times led to a shift in approach? Even though it has never yielded any benefits, why have several presidential administrations tried to distance the United States from Israel? (Public Affairs Program)
  • ISIS: Inside the Army of Terror | 10/06/15 Michael Weiss With brutal force and horrific beheadings of hostages, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) has shocked the world. It has conquered territory equal to the size of Great Britain--and promises to create a new Muslim caliphate under the strict dictates of Sharia law. How does ISIS recruit its jihadi army of international volunteers? Where do the key players, like elusive leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, come from? And how has the movement attracted global support and financing? (Public Affairs Program)
  • A Conversation with Karenna Gore on Ethics and our Ecological Crisis | 10/01/15 Karenna Gore Karenna Gore and the Center for Earth Ethics (CEE) see our ecological crisis as the consequence of a deeper malady: the dominant economic development agenda that results in the exploitation of people and nature for short-term and inequitable financial gain. So for real change to occur, a new paradigm based on the sustained well-being of all people and our planet must materialize. How are Gore and the CEE working to make this happen? What is the role of spiritual, indigenous, and religious communities? (Ethics Matter Series)
  • Pope Francis Among the Wolves: The Inside Story of a Revolution | 09/30/15 Marco Politi There's no doubt that Pope Francis has changed the tone of the papacy. He's accessible and energetic, where his predecessor seemed reclusive and tired. But in becoming the face of change, Francis has also raised the expectation of change. Will Pope Francis succeed in overcoming his opponents and save the faith from decline? (Public Affairs Program)
  • NATO in the 21st Century: Addressing New and Urgent Challenges | 09/28/15 Douglas E. Lute As recent events indicate, Russia sees NATO as the top threat to Russian interests and has called for increased investment of its naval forces in the Black Sea; Turkey is under siege by ISIS; Libya is unstable; and extremism in Iraq and Syria is on the rise. How will NATO address Russian aggression in Ukraine and in the Baltic Sea? Will NATO also be drawn into the Middle East conflict? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Is the Eurozone Crisis Over? | 09/18/15 Martin Wolf The eurozone economy is at last beginning to recover, including the crisis-hit countries, except for Greece. But all of the countries have suffered at least a lost decade. Are they now securely on the mend? Is the new Greek program going to work? Has the eurozone been adequately reformed? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Carnegie Council Co-sponsors International New York Times Athens Democracy Forum in Athens, Greece | 09/13/15
    Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs is proud to be a co-sponsor of this important "International New York Times" Forum. Coinciding with UN International Democracy Day, the Athens Democracy Forum will convene diplomats, scholars, corporate executives, politicians, government ministers, experts, and journalists from around the world. Together, at the ancient Agora--the birthplace of democracy--we will explore the state of liberal democracies and the major challenges they face in the world today.
  • Russia's Soft Power: A Matter for Church and State | 09/10/15 Nikolas K. Gvosdev, Nadieszda Kizenko, Nicolai N. Petro In the current frigid environment of U.S.-Russia relations, there is much debate over Russia’s legitimate strategic interests. Of equal importance for understanding Russian attitudes is a grasp of the values, the moral framework for her foreign policy. Three leading experts on Russia's "soft power" will explain the roles of the state and the Russian Orthodox Church in formulating this framework of values. (U.S. Global Engagement Program)
  • HDCA Conference: Capabilities on the Move: Mobility and Aspirations | 09/10/15 Deen Chatterjee, Lyn Boyd-Judson, Cheyney C. Ryan The 2015 Human Development & Capability Association Program Committee cordially invites scholars, government policy makers, practitioners, and other interested parties from all over the world to participate in this conference, which is co-sponsored by Carnegie Council.
  • The Republic of Conscience | 06/30/15 Gary Hart America is nowhere near the republic it set out to be at its founding, falling to the very misconduct it hoped to avoid. How has America's sense of national interest become distorted and diluted? How have the military, the CIA, and Congress led the country away from its founding principles? Is there hope for Americans who feel jaded, confused, and disappointed by their own government? (Public Affairs Program)
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