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  • The Republic of Conscience | 06/30/15 Gary Hart America is nowhere near the republic it set out to be at its founding, falling to the very misconduct it hoped to avoid. How has America's sense of national interest become distorted and diluted? How have the military, the CIA, and Congress led the country away from its founding principles? Is there hope for Americans who feel jaded, confused, and disappointed by their own government? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Ethical Leadership: A Conversation with Chuck Hagel | 06/18/15 Chuck Hagel From a highly decorated stint serving in the U.S Army during the Vietnam War, to a successful business career running multiple companies in different industries, to two high-profile terms in the Senate, and culminating with a tenure as the secretary of defense, the one constant in Chuck Hagel's varied and pressure-filled career has been ethical leadership. How have his experiences--in war, the boardroom, and Congress--shaped his leadership style? (U.S. Global Engagement Program)
  • A Conversation with Ashoka Founder Bill Drayton on Social Entrepreneurship | 06/11/15 Bill Drayton "The life purpose of the true social entrepreneur is to change the world," says Bill Drayton. "[H]e or she simply cannot come to rest in life until his or her vision has become the new pattern society-wide." What is a social entrepreneur? Conventional entrepreneurs typically measure performance in profit and return, but social entrepreneurs also take into account a positive return to society. The term was first popularized by Bill Drayton, who founded Ashoka in 1980. Today, Ashoka is the largest network of social entrepreneurs worldwide, with close to 3,000 Ashoka Fellows in 70 countries. (Ethics Matter Series)
  • Agenda for the Future: Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCR) | 06/08/15 Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein With wars throughout the Middle East, terror threats in Africa, and challenges for minority groups and immigrants in Europe and the Americas, it is a particularly fraught time for Jordan's Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein, the United Nations high commissioner for human rights. How is his office dealing with these myriad threats? What is their agenda for the future? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Global Ethics Conference, Tokyo, Japan | 06/05/15
    International Christian University and Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs are organizing a collaborative symposium on Global Ethics. This event is held as a part of Global Ethical Dialogues, which is the world-wide project led by Carnegie's Centennial Chair Michael Ignatieff. The main theme for the symposium is "Global Ethics: Nuclear Energy, Technology and Risk."
  • Uehiro Lecture: Michael Ignatieff Explores "Technology and Risk: Learning from the Japanese Experience” | 06/04/15 Michael Ignatieff In a globalized world, all nations face a common moral challenge: how to foresee, prevent, and if prediction and prevention fail, how to manage the catastrophic risks presented by new technologies. Japan has had to think hard about this challenge in the wake of Fukushima. What can other nations learn from Japan's painful experience? Is the preventive principle--"first do no harm"--a sufficient guide for policy?
  • A Conversation with Ethan Zuckerman on the Ethics of the Internet | 06/03/15 Ethan Zuckerman "I'd really like to see us get globalization right. For me, getting globalization right wouldn't mean that we have stuff from every corner of the world, but would mean that we have people and ideas and opportunities and solutions from every corner of the world." What is the role of technology and digital media in the ongoing globalization process? How can they connect the world in more ethical and inclusive ways? (Ethics Matter Series)
  • A Dangerous Master: How to Keep Technology from Slipping Beyond Our Control | 06/02/15 Wendell Wallach From combat drones to nanotechnology, 3-D printers to synthetic organisms, our most recent inventions increasingly defy the norms for acceptable uses of technology. Who should be held accountable when machines break or people die? What responsibility do we, as creators and users, have for our technologies? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Ethics in U.S. Foreign Policy: Spymaster Jack Devine on the CIA | 05/26/15 Jack Devine During his distinguished 32-year career in the CIA, Jack Devine headed many of the Agency's most important, dramatic, and successful operations. He argues that covert operations, not costly and devastating full-scale interventions, are the best safeguard of America's interests worldwide. (Ethics Matter Series)
  • Crisis in Yemen: Instability on the Arabian Peninsula | 05/20/15 Bernard Haykel The crisis in Yemen continues to worsen, pitting the Saudi-led Gulf countries against Shiite rival Iran--with the U.S. supporting the Saudi coalition. How can this dire situation be resolved? What does this conflict mean long-term for the Middle East and, indeed, the United States? (Public Affairs Program)
  • The UN's Efforts in International Development: Relevant or Not? | 05/12/15 David M. Malone The United Nations is undertaking a herculean effort to produce a new generation of sustainable development goals, to be formally agreed upon at a summit this coming September. With underwhelming results so far, is the UN the right place for international development? How does December's Climate Summit in Paris fit in with this effort? (Public Affairs Program)
  • From Nuclear Deterrence to Disarmament: Evolving Catholic Perspectives | 05/07/15 Bernardito C. Auza, Des Browne, J. Bryan Hehir, Maryann Cusimano Love, Gerard F. Powers In collaboration with the Kroc Institute, this discussion will address the policy, religious, and ethical implications of nuclear capabilities. This event is especially timely since it coincides with the Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference and reflects on the major statements issued by the Holy See at the Vienna Conference about nuclear weapons last December. (U.S. Global Engagement Program)
  • Headscarves and Hymens: Why the Middle East Needs a Sexual Revolution | 05/06/15 Mona Eltahawy, Naureen Chowdhury Fink Since the beginning of the Arab Spring, women in the Arab world have had two revolutions to undertake: one fought with men against oppressive regimes, and another fought against an entire political and economic system that treats women as second-class citizens. What can we do to work for equal rights for women in the Arab world? Why is it so hard to substantively fight against misogyny in North Africa and the Middle East? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Full Planet, Empty Plates | 05/04/15 Lester R. Brown "In this era of tightening world food supplies, the ability to grow food is fast becoming a new form of geopolitical leverage. Food is the new oil," says Lester R. Brown. What will the geopolitics of food look like in a new era dominated by scarcity and food nationalism? (Public Affairs Program)
  • The Ethics Police?: The Struggle to Make Human Research Safe | 04/28/15 Robert L. Klitzman Research on human beings saves countless lives, but has at times harmed the participants. Although in 1974, the U.S. government established Institutional Review Boards to oversee research on humans, ethics violations persist. To what extent should government regulate science and how? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Conference on Democracy and Values | 04/25/15
    This international conference is co-hosted by Carnegie Council and Global Thinkers Forum. A select delegation of high-profile scholars and ethical visionaries, including senior Carnegie Council staff, will participate in an intensive, multi-phased dialogue with Greek academics, public officials, business leaders, activists, students, and citizens. They will pursue ethical questions that lie at the heart of the Greek tradition of democracy and develop a new understanding of global citizenship that transcends national borders.
  • Defending our Borders vs. Defending our Liberties: ACLU's Anthony D. Romero | 04/23/15 Anthony D. Romero Anthony D. Romero has been the executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) during a period when American civil liberties have been threatened as they have not been since the early days of the Cold War. Under his leadership, the ACLU has taken a lead role in challenging the Patriot Act and the NSA's surveillance program. Romero will talk about Edward Snowden, drones, the U.S. "Kill List," and the balance that must be struck between defending our borders and defending our liberties. (Ethics Matter Series)
  • Blueprint for Revolution: How to Use Rice Pudding, Lego Men, and Other Nonviolent Techniques to Galvanize Communities, Overthrow Dictators, or Simply Change the World | 04/22/15 Srdja Popovic, Tina Rosenberg Although current events indicate otherwise, revolutions don't have to be violent. How can you master the art of compromise to bring together even the most disparate groups? What are some ways you can make oppression backfire by playing your opponents' strongest card against them? How can you use humor to make yourself heard? (Public Affairs Program)
  • The Crisis of Europe's Muslims | 04/13/15 Juan Cole "Al-Qaeda wants to mentally colonize French Muslims, but faces a wall of disinterest. But if it can get non-Muslim French to be beastly to ethnic Muslims on the grounds that they are Muslims, it can start creating a common political identity around grievance against discrimination." So wrote Professor Juan Cole, an expert on Islamic and Western relations, in a recent article. He will discuss effective methods to thwart al-Qaeda's manipulative tactics. (U.S. Global Engagement Program)
  • The Paradox of Liberation | 04/07/15 Michael Walzer Many of the successful campaigns for national liberation in the years following World War II were initially based on democratic and secular ideals. Once established, however, the newly independent nations had to deal with entirely unexpected religious fierceness. This trend is clearly evident in India, Israel, and Algeria, three nations whose founding principles have been sharply attacked by three different groups of religious revivalists: Hindu militants, ultra-Orthodox Jews and messianic Zionists, and Islamic radicals, respectively. Why have these states and others been unable to reproduce their political culture beyond one or two generations? (Public Affairs Program)
  • P5 + 1 + Iran: Report on Results from Geneva | 04/02/15 Seyed Hossein Mousavian Ambassador Mousavian will report on the outcome and consequences of the latest round of negotiations on the Iranian nuclear program that concluded on March 31, 2015. (U.S. Global Engagement)
  • American Energy Challenges and Global Leadership in the Years Ahead | 03/31/15 Helima Croft, John M. Deutch, David Gordon, Marc Lipschultz, Elizabeth Rosenberg Dramatic changes in the global energy system pose hard choices for U.S. interests and values. What are the leadership responsibilities of the United States in the changing energy market? How extensively can the United States involve itself in policy initiatives to promote market stability? What are the ethical challenges of U.S. action (or inaction)? (American Leadership Series)
  • The Eleventh Hour: The Legacy and the Lessons of World War I | 03/19/15 Charles M. Sennott One hundred years after the First World War, boundaries established after the armistice at the "eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month" still shape many of today's conflicts. Charles Sennott is founder and executive director of The GroundTruth Project. From ISIS's invasion of Mosul to Boko Haram's kidnapping of schoolgirls, Sennott journeys from Iraq to Nigeria to the Balkans to Northern Ireland and the Holy Land to see how WWI's history lives on and the lessons learned—and far too often not learned. (Public Affairs Program)
  • The Kurdish Spring: A New Map of the Middle East | 03/18/15 David L. Phillips With 32 million Kurds in "Kurdistan," which includes parts of Iran, Iraq, Syria, and Turkey, the Kurds are the largest stateless people in the world. And with chemical weapon attacks from Saddam Hussein in 1988 as the most glaring example, they have faced prosecution and repression in each of these states. In recent years, though, the Kurds have evolved from a victimized people into a coherent political community. What is the cause of this transformation? In the face of Islamic extremism, how do the Kurds help to advance U.S. strategic and security interests in the region? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Womenomics: An Economic and Social Roadmap for Japan | 03/16/15
    Expanding opportunities for women to join Japan's workforce is a centerpiece of the "Abenomics" economic revival strategy proposed by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. In fact, it has its own name: "Womenomics." Can Japan unleash the economic power of women to revitalize its economy? How large might the "Womenomics" dividend be?
  • Nigeria and the Horror of Boko Haram | 03/03/15 John Campbell When it comes to Islamic extremist groups, ISIS, the Taliban, and al-Qaeda are the main focus of the Western media and the U.S. State Department. But Boko Haram, it can be argued, is just as big a threat to global stability as it continues to terrorize a large swath of Nigeria, Africa's richest and most populous state. Why has the American media and military seemingly ignored this brutal war? Why does Boko Haram act with impunity in Northern Nigeria? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Patients with Passports: Medical Tourism, Law, and Ethics | 02/24/15 I. Glenn Cohen, Robert L. Klitzman Medical tourism is a growing, multi-billion dollar industry involving millions of patients who travel abroad each year to get health care. Some seek services like hip replacements and travel to avoid queues, save money, or because their insurer has given them an incentive to do so. Others seek to circumvent prohibitions on accessing services at home and go abroad to receive abortions, assisted suicide, commercial surrogacy, or experimental stem cell treatments. How safe are these procedures? How do you ensure that you will be protected if anything should happen? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Ebola and Other Viral Outbreaks: Providing Health Care to the Global Poor in Times of Crisis | 02/13/15 Unni Karunakara, Robert L. Klitzman Providing health care to people in crisis is challenging, as the recent Ebola crisis has shown. Responding professionally to increasingly complex needs while retaining the humanitarian spirit that responds to unacceptable human suffering is a major challenge facing all aid agencies. Over the past few decades, the humanitarian sector has attempted to create global standards, but what happens when governments fail to provide adequate medical services for their populations? (Public Affairs Program)
  • A Conversation with Leon Botstein, President of Bard College and Champion of Liberal Arts Education | 02/04/15 Leon Botstein Now in his 40th year as president of Bard College, Leon Botstein is one of the great practitioners and one of the most passionate advocates of the liberal arts education. Botstein is himself an incarnation of that deeply threatened tradition: He is the conductor of the American Symphony Orchestra, and he teaches in Bard's mandatory great-books class. At a time when college presidents often sound like cautious bureaucrats, Botstein expresses himself exuberantly and piercingly. (Ethics Matter Series)
  • Flashpoints: The Emerging Crisis in Europe | 01/30/15 George Friedman Despite its reputation as a "civilized" and "cultured" continent, European wars have killed over 100 million people in the last century. Are there "flashpoints" still smoldering beneath the surface that we should pay attention to? (Public Affairs Program)
  • The Afghan Challenge | 01/21/15 Zahir Tanin, Barnett Rubin Afghanistan is faced with many challenges, and central among them is how to make the new democratically elected government work. Nobody understands this test better than Ambassador Zahir Tanin, the nation's longtime permanent representative to the United Nations. With President Ashraf Ghani taking charge last September after a prolonged election, can Afghanistan find a way out of decades of conflict and oppression? (Public Affairs Programs)
  • Extreme Political Parties in Greece: Economic and Cultural Factors | 01/15/15 Yannis Palaiologos Yannis Palaiologos, a prominent Greek scholar-journalist, will describe the political rise of extreme parties on both right and left in Greece, including the ultra-right Golden Dawn movement and the Coalition of the Radical Left, better known as Syriza. What was the role of externally imposed economic austerity and the ensuing massive recession? What has been the effect of uncontrolled illegal immigration on Greek politics? Can the traditional political parties win back the public's trust? (U.S. Global Engagement Program)
  • Top Risks and Ethical Decisions 2015 | 01/12/15 Ian Bremmer What are the biggest risks for 2015? What are the associated ethical decisions? Political risk guru Ian Bremmer discusses his annual list. (Ethics Matter Series)
  • A Conversation with Lawrence Lessig | 12/10/14 Lawrence Lessig Lawrence Lessig is a Harvard Law professor and activist who has launched a crusade against the corrupting influence of money in politics. Seeking to fight fire with fire, Lessig has founded Mayday.us, a "super PAC" which raised $10 million in the last election to support candidates committed to radical reform of campaign financing. Most of them lost, but Lessig is not daunted. He brings a passionate intelligence to bear on the legal, political, cultural, and moral dimensions of the issue. (Ethics Matter Series)
  • The Rise of ISIS: Implications for U.S. Strategy, Interests, and Values | 12/09/14 Michael T. Flynn, Robert Ford, Frances Townsend, Michèle Flournoy The unexpected strength of ISIS poses hard choices for U.S. interests and values. What is America's strategy? Is it working? What are the ethical challenges of U.S. action (or inaction) to stop ISIS? Ambassador Robert Ford, and Frances Townsend will address these in a panel discussion moderated by Center for a New American Security co-founder Michèle Flournoy. (American Leadership Series)
  • A Conversation with Lieutenant General H. R. McMaster | 12/04/14 H. R. McMaster, Martin L. Cook General H. R. McMaster will discuss his role as leader of the U.S. Army's futures think tank (ARCIC), and its newly published white paper on future conflict. How does the U.S. military think about conflict in 2025 and beyond? How is it preparing? What ethical dilemmas are anticipated? And how will current decisions affect future national security?
  • America in Retreat: The New Isolationism and the Coming Global Disorder | 12/02/14 Bret Stephens As Americans seek to withdraw from the world to tend to domestic problems, the country's adversaries and rivals spy opportunity, and its allies doubt the credibility of security guarantees. Is there a profound global crisis on the horizon? What can the United States do to reverse course and safeguard not only greater peace in the world but also greater prosperity at home? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Russia in the Global Context | 12/01/14 Thomas E. Graham, Nicolai N. Petro, Arturas Rozenas, David C. Speedie, Yanni Kotsonis What is the current state of, and prospects for, Russia in regional and global affairs? How do U.S.-Russian relations look in the context of the Ukraine Crisis and beyond? How did the current crisis emerge from the recent post-Cold War history? The panel will pay special attention to the long-term strategies and objectives that have animated U.S. and Russian policymakers; the way these have been disrupted by the crisis over Ukraine; and the likely future of Russian and American strategies in Eastern Europe. (NYU's Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia and U.S. Global Engagement Program)
  • Strategies for Countering Violent Extremists | 11/24/14 Jean-Paul Laborde The world remains focused on ISIS' brutal campaign in Iraq and Syria, but in Nigeria, Boko Haram has been imposing their terrifying form of Islam in much the same way. What is the role of the UN in countering terrorism? What can civil society, religious authorities, and other non-governmental actors do to prevent the spread of terrorism? (Public Affairs Program)
  • From "Indispensable Nation" to "Realism-Based Restraint": Reconsidering U.S. Engagement with the World | 11/20/14 Chas W. Freeman, Jr. An informed and perceptive critic of foreign policy, Ambassador Freeman will discuss core questions facing the United States. How effective is our current engagement in key areas of the world? What are our core interests and how are we pursuing them? Is "realism-based restraint" a sensible policy option, in general? (U.S. Global Engagement Program)
  • Outpost: Life on the Frontlines of American Diplomacy | 11/20/14 Christopher Hill What effect does bureaucratic warfare in Washington have on diplomacy? What did America get wrong in its wars of choice? From the wars in the Balkans to the brutality of North Korea to the endless war in Iraq, former American diplomat Christopher Hill gives an inside look at the life of an ambassador. (Public Affairs Program)
  • Citizenship, Identity, and Conflict in South Asia's Borderlands | 11/13/14 Suchitra Vijayan Suchitra Vijayan is working on a 9,000-mile journey through South Asia, which has taken her to Afghanistan and Pakistan, the disputed territory of Kashmir, and India's borders with Burma and China. What can this project tell us about the effects of borders on human lives and events? (Carnegie New Leaders)
  • Heirs to Forgotten Kingdoms: Journeys Into the Disappearing Religions of the Middle East | 11/12/14 Gerard Russell Despite its reputation for religious intolerance, the Middle East has long sheltered many distinctive faiths. How are the Mandaeans and Yazidis of Iraq, the Zoroastrians of Iran, and the Copts of Egypt hanging on to their ancient traditions? What does the rise of militant Islamic sects and the lure of the West mean for these faiths' survival? (Public Affairs Program)
  • A Conversation with General Martin Dempsey, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff | 11/06/14 Martin E. Dempsey At a time when America thought it would be winding down its wars, the military is now fighting ISIS in Iraq and Syria, various militant groups in Yemen and Somalia, and Ebola in West Africa. At the center of it all is the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Martin Dempsey. What role does ethics have within the world's largest military? (Public Affairs Program)
  • A Conversation with David Keyes on Advancing Human Rights | 11/03/14 David Keyes With a focus on empowering dissidents and providing them with the tools to succeed, David Keyes is exploring new strategies in the fight for human rights for those living under authoritarian regimes. How can social media be used to promote a more pluralistic world? How important is outside pressure? (Ethics Matter Series)
  • A Conversation with Will Kymlicka on the Challenges of Multiculturalism | 10/29/14 Will Kymlicka Are there multi-ethnic societies that are successful models of tolerance and pluralism? What is the Canadian model, and how does it differ from that of the United States? Best known for his work on multiculturalism and animal ethics, Canadian political philosopher Will Kymlicka will discuss these issues and more, including his views on animal rights. (Ethics Matter Series)
  • If Mayors Ruled the World: Dysfunctional Nations, Rising Cities | 10/22/14 Benjamin R. Barber In the face of the most perilous challenges of our time, the nations of the world seem paralyzed. Is the nation-state, once democracy's best hope, now democratically dysfunctional? Obsolete? The answer is yes, says Benjamin R. Barber. Can cities and the mayors who run them do a better job? (Public Affairs Program)
  • The Shifts and the Shocks: What We've Learned--and Have Still to Learn--From the Financial Crisis | 10/20/14 Martin Wolf Why did the 2008 financial crisis occur? What forces created our fragile economy? What did this recent crisis teach us about modern economies and economics? And in the end, what reforms are needed so that we do not repeat our past mistakes? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Global Ethics and the Point of View of the Universe | 10/16/14 Peter Singer What does the idea of taking "the point of view of the universe" tell us about ethics? The great 19th century philosopher Henry Sidgwick used this metaphor to present what he took to be a self-evident moral truth: the good of one individual is of no more importance than the good of any other. By using reason, what can we learn about ethical judgements and objective truths?
  • Fourth Annual Global Ethics Fellows Conference, with The City College of New York | 10/16/14
    Carnegie Council is delighted to partner with The City College of New York (CCNY) to host its Fourth Annual Global Ethics Fellows Conference. Held at CCNY's campus in Upper Manhattan, the conference will include six roundtables with our Global Ethics Fellows on the Council's Centennial themes, each chaired by a CCNY professor.
  • Global Ethics Day | 10/16/14
    As part of its Centennial activities, Carnegie Council is inaugurating a worldwide Global Ethics Day on October 16. We would like to encourage academic institutions around the world, including in our network, to use this day to hold their own events, lectures, or other educational activity to explore a "global ethic" as well. (Global Ethics Network)
  • Michael Ignatieff in Conversation with Paul Holdengräber | 10/15/14 Paul Holdengräber, Michael Ignatieff As part of Carnegie Council's Centennial project, "Ethics for a Connected World," Centennial Chair Michael Ignatieff explores the complicated ethical landscape of press, politics, and public policy with the New York Public Library's Paul Holdengräber.
  • Fourth Annual Global Ethics Fellows Conference | 10/15/14 Michael Ignatieff, Peter Singer Carnegie Council hosts its Global Ethics Fellows and Ethics Fellows for the Future for a three-day series of workshops and panel discussions, punctuated by a day-long conference at The City College of New York. Fellows and students will continue exploring our six Centennial themes and their implications for the future.
  • Political Order and Political Decay: From the Industrial Revolution to the Globalization of Democracy | 10/10/14 Francis Fukuyama Taking up the essential question of how societies develop strong, impersonal, and accountable political institutions, Francis Fukuyama follows the story from the French Revolution to the so-called Arab Spring and the deep dysfunctions of contemporary American politics. Why have some regions developed more quickly than others? What is the future of democracy in the face of a rising global middle class and entrenched political paralysis in the West? (Public Affairs Program)
  • Elite Perceptions of the United States in Europe and Asia | 10/07/14 Xenia Wickett A new report finds that political and business leaders in Asia value U.S. hard power while Europeans focus on American values. Both, though, view U.S. business more positively than the government. What do these attitudes mean for policymakers and civil society? (U.S. Global Engagement Program)
  • Peaceland: Conflict Resolution and the Everyday Politics of International Intervention | 10/01/14 Séverine Autesserre Why do international peace interventions often fail to reach their full potential? Based on several years of research in conflict zones around the world, Barnard professor Séverine Autesserre will demonstrate how everyday elements strongly influence peacebuilding effectiveness. What are some innovative ways to better help host populations and build a sustainable peace? (Carnegie New Leaders)
  • A Conversation with Lieutenant-General Roméo A. Dallaire | 09/23/14 Roméo A. Dallaire Roméo A. Dallaire, the head of the UN peacekeeping mission in Rwanda during the genocide in 1994, played a heroic role trying to save lives in the face of overwhelming odds. Since that time, he has become a voice of conscience on the doctrine known as "the responsibility to protect" and an advocate for ending the use of child soldiers. He will speak on the imperative to act in the face of atrocities and the instruments available to limit their impact on innocent civilians. (Ethics Matter Series)
  • Foreign Fighters in Syria | 09/23/14 Richard Barrett The conflict in Syria is now about much more than Bashar al-Assad. As the ISIS offensive in Northern Iraq and the refugee crises in Lebanon and Jordan have shown, it has spilled over Syria's porous borders. How should the West respond? And why does Islamic extremism attract so many? (Public Affairs Program)
  • How to Prevent Another Great Recession | 09/18/14 Asli Ay In the run-up to the Great Recession, lawmakers and regulators confused correlation with causation and symptoms with the disease, and bent the reality to suit their political rhetoric, effectively planting the seeds of the next crisis. What can we learn from this experience that would allow us to improve our system of growth and opportunity called capitalism? (Carnegie New Leaders)
  • Climate Change and the Future of Humanity | 09/16/14 Dale Jamieson, Darrel Moellendorf, Mary Robinson, Henry Shue How will climate change affect humankind in the coming years? What can private citizens, governments, and NGOs do in the face of a seemingly insurmountable challenge? (Public Affairs Program)
July 2015
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