Reconciling Economic Imperatives with Social Priorities: the Global Compact

Feb 25, 2000

Paper presented at the Carnegie Council in February 2000.

Globalization has increasingly disconnected one single element— networks of production and finance—from what had been an overall system of institutional relations, and sent it off on its own spatial and temporal trajectory. This has produced disequillibria in the world political economy, which will persist unless and until the strictly economic sphere is embedded once more in broader frameworks of shared values and institutionalized practices.

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