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Carnegie Council provides an open forum for discussion. Views expressed are not necessarily those of Carnegie Council.

Transcripts have been edited for clarity and grammar.

Please note that as of September 2011, we are posting highlights of event videos on this website, not the full videos. For videos in full from September 2011 onwards, please go to our UStream page.

Japan's Relationship with its Past and Future | 07/26/2016 Alexis Dudden, Devin T. Stewart Prime Minister Abe is the leading member of the small but powerful group Nippon Kaigi, which wants to turn its back on the international community and return to Japanese traditions. It advocates restoring the emperor to the center of power, eradicating equal rights for women, and revising the Constitution. What are its chances of success?

Japan's Politics: A Move toward Nationalism or more of the Status Quo? | 07/14/2016 Sheila A. Smith, Devin T. Stewart Was Prime Minister Abe's landslide victory in the July elections a vote of confidence in his ability to jump-start Japan's stagnant economy, or simply a desire for stability? Will he use his majority to revise Japan's constitution? What is the mood of the country today, especially among young people? Find out from Japan scholar Sheila Smith.

A World History of Political Violence | 06/30/2016 Rachel Kleinfeld, Devin T. Stewart Rachel Kleinfeld discusses with Devin Stewart her research--which took her to five continents over the past three years--and forthcoming book on how violence is perpetuated and curtailed in societies around the world. Kleinfeld discusses the role of political power, corruption, law enforcement, leadership, and grassroots movements.

The Needs of Refugee Women and Children in the Global Humanitarian Crisis | 06/24/2016 Sarah Costa, Joanne J. Myers In this powerful talk, executive director Sarah Costa explains the work of the Women's Refugee Commission, and discusses the current crisis. The numbers are staggering: one in 122 people across the world have been forced to flee, and the majority are women and children. The average length of displacement is 20 years. What can be done to help?

Islam and Pluralism in Indonesia | 06/24/2016 Margaret Scott, Devin T. Stewart "It's going on 20 years that Indonesia has been engaged in a very important experiment, which is to create a democracy in a Muslim-majority place," explains journalist and scholar Margaret Scott. In this valuable interview, she untangles the complex relationships between various factions of Islam and politics in the world's most populous Muslim-majority country.

Time to Wake Up | 06/23/2016 Sheldon Whitehouse, Ted Widmer "The story of our failure on climate change is a story of our failure to understand the truly manipulative and evil effects of money in politics," declares Senator Whitehouse. "It's being deployed right now. You undo Citizens United and we will have a bill in a month."

Panama Papers in Perspective: Tracing Illicit Capital Flows | 06/15/2016 Krishen Mehta In this Institute of Current World Affairs speech on May 20, with the sensational revelations from the "Panama Papers" still emerging, Krishen Mehta, a longtime friend and supporter of Carnegie Council, explained how $30 trillion in illicit capital flows to secret jurisdictions keep poor countries mired in poverty and increase global insecurity for everyone.

Move Over, Black Swan: Here Comes the Gray Rhino | 06/22/2016 Michele Wucker Black swans are unforeseeable, but gray rhinos are the looming threats right in front of our noses that we choose to ignore, says policy analyst Michele Wucker. Her top five rhinos right now are: the fragmentation of the EU; liquidity shocks in the financial markets; political instability in the U.S.; climate change; and the Middle East.

The Invention of Russia: The Journey from Gorbachev's Freedom to Putin's War | 06/14/2016 Arkady Ostrovsky When the Soviet Union fell 25 years ago, Gorbachev spoke of "living in a new world" where Russia would no longer interfere in other countries' affairs. What happened? In this riveting talk, Russia expert Arkady Ostrovsky analyzes the powerful role of the media, noting that Putin did an extraordinary thing: "he merged security services with the media."

"We Love Death as You Love Life": Britain's Suburban Terrorists | 06/13/2016 Rafaello Pantucci, Devin T. Stewart What drives people in the UK to become terrorists or jihadist fighters? Pantucci's years of research into this problem has implications for all Western countries.  Most disturbingly, he concludes that there is no single profile. However, there are three factors to look for: a sense of grievance, social mobilization, and ideology.

Ukraine Update | 06/08/2016 Nicolai N. Petro, David C. Speedie David Speedie discusses with Dr. Nicolai Petro the situation in Ukraine--political, economic, and the growing civil conflict between East and West--two years into the Poroshenko presidency.

The Next Pandemic: On the Front Lines Against Humankind's Gravest Dangers | 05/31/2016 Ali S. Khan In over 20 years at the CDC, Dr. Ali Khan battled Ebola, SARS, and other deadly diseases. But, as he reveals in this fascinating talk, what really worries him is the effect that political and social factors can have on fighting these outbreaks. With Zika emerging as the newest threat, what can governments--and individuals--do to be better prepared?

Return to Cold War | 05/26/2016 Robert H. Legvold, David C. Speedie Columbia's Robert Legvold argues that the United States and Russia are, indeed, in a new Cold War with plenty of blame for both sides. And despite its economic and military decline, he says that Russia is still the most important nation when it comes to U.S. foreign policy. Can the two states find a way forward?

How Rights for Indigenous Peoples Can Save the Environment | 06/06/2016 Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, Amber Kiwan From Greenland to Kenya, indigenous peoples are fighting for their land against governments, corporations, and climate change. UN special rapporteur Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, herself an indigenous leader in the Philippines, discusses the challenges facing her country and how to navigate through the world of politics and big business.

Threats and Opportunities on the Korean Peninsula | 05/20/2016 Gheewhan Kim, Scott A. Snyder, Sue Mi Terry "Simply put, North Korea still needs to go a long way to achieve sophisticated levels of mid- to long-range nuclear missiles," declares Consul General Gheewan Kim. In this in-depth discussion, the panelists explore the current situation on the Korean peninsula, the role of China and the U.S., and opportunities for unification of the North and the South.

Sujata Gadkar-Wilcox on Political Responsibility in India and the United States | 05/18/2016 Sujata Gadkar-Wilcox, Alex Woodson What do citizens living in a democracy owe their country in terms of upholding its values and laws? Both Gandhi and Obama emphasize the importance of individual responsibility, which has to go beyond just voting, says Gadkar-Wilcox. Don't miss this fascinating discussion on Indian and U.S. perspectives, both historically and in today's fraught politics.

Chuck Hagel on U.S. Challenges in Today's "Complicated, Interconnected World" | 05/20/2016 Chuck Hagel Drawing on decades of experience, Secretary Hagel gives a masterly and frank analysis of world events. He discusses current U.S. politics--he's confident that the Constitution will see America through--the nuclear deal with Iran, the melting in the Arctic and resulting "Great Game of the North," China's power play in the South China Sea, and much more.

"Religious Harmony" Regulations Creating Dissonance in Indonesia | 05/17/2016 Andreas Harsono, Amber Kiwan Andreas Harsono of Human Rights Watch discusses the complex situation in Indonesia, including the 2006 religious harmony regulation supposed to protect religious minorities, but which in practice has enabled religious majorities to discriminate against minorities; the draconian blasphemy laws; Islamic extremism; and much more.

A Rage for Order: The Middle East in Turmoil, from Tahrir Square to ISIS | 05/13/2016 Robert F. Worth, Roger Cohen In this memorable conversation, "New York Times" journalists Robert Worth and Roger Cohen discuss Worth's latest book about the Arab Spring and its aftermath. Was its collapse inevitable? Could/should the U.S. have done more, especially regarding Syria? Despite all, Worth concludes the talk on a hopeful note.

An Evaluation of Gender Balance in the Leadership of the UN Secretariat | 06/01/2016 Ourania S. Yancopoulos "We see the UN come out time and time again for a need for gender parity, not only within its organization, but at the state level," says Ourania Yancopoulos in her winning presentation for the Council's Student Research Conference. "However, we see that the rhetoric used and the reporting used by the institution do not match the reality."

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