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Introduction to "Ethics & International Affairs," Spring 2015 | 03/24/2015 Zach Dorfman In this podcast, Zach Dorfman introduces the spring 2015 issue of "Ethics & International Affairs." Topics include a symposium on imagining a "Drone Accountability Regime"; Liberia, Ebola, and the "Cult of Bankable Projects"; moral and political responsibility in world politics; and space, drones, and just war.

The Eleventh Hour: The Legacy and the Lessons of World War I | 03/24/2015 Charles M. Sennott One hundred years after the First World War, boundaries established after the armistice at the "eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month" still shape many of today's conflicts, from ISIS's invasion of Mosul to Boko Haram's kidnapping of schoolgirls. What lessons have we learned from WWI? Just as important, what have we still not learned?

The Kurdish Spring: A New Map of the Middle East | 03/20/2015 David L. Phillips In this stirring, information-filled talk on the Kurdish people, David Phillips recounts centuries of abuse and repression against the world's "largest stateless people." But he also illuminates the vitality of today's Kurds, who are "pro-Western and secular" and have proven to be America's most capable regional partners in the fight against ISIS.

Dual Legacy: The Effect of Business Thinking on the Social Sector | 03/05/2015 Steve Davis, Stanley N. Katz, Amber Kiwan, Darin McKeever, Tom Paulson, Julia Taylor Kennedy This month on "Impact," we're taking a close look at a huge issue--legacy. In this case, we're examining how it relates to contemporary philanthropy and the social sector in general. Specifically, we examine the $37-billion Gates Foundation's dual legacy in promoting global health, and in shaping the social sector at large.

Tourism, Farmers, & Technology in Africa: Eddie Mandhry from NYU Africa House | 03/04/2015 Eddie Mandhry, Alex Woodson "What's been amazing is that across Africa there is a movement where people are adopting technologies and leapfrogging some of the developmental stages that you'd have to go through," says Eddie Mandhry, Carnegie New Leader.

Nigeria and the Horror of Boko Haram | 03/09/2015 John Campbell "Like other radical insurgencies, Boko Haram is fueled by poor governance, political marginalization, and its region's deepening impoverishment," says former Ambassador to Nigeria John Campbell. "However, it is also shaped by specifically Nigerian circumstances and factors." This talk helps us understand Boko Haram's roots, ideology, and goals.

The United States, Russia, and Ukraine: Report from Moscow | 03/10/2015 Dmitri Trenin, David C. Speedie Dmitri Trenin, director of Carnegie Endowment's Moscow Center, served in the Soviet and Russian military for two decades and understands both the Russian and U.S. points of view. He warns that U.S.-Russia relations are heading for a new version of the Cold War, and also discusses the Russian economy and its relations with China and other countries.

Patients with Passports: Medical Tourism, Law, and Ethics | 03/02/2015 I. Glenn Cohen, Robert L. Klitzman Medical tourism is big business, involving millions of patients who travel abroad to get health care. Some travel to avoid queues and save money. Others seek services that are illegal in their own country, such as abortions and surrogate pregnancies. As Cohen explains, this growing industry opens a Pandora's box of legal and ethical questions.

Ebola and Other Viral Outbreaks: Providing Health Care to the Global Poor in Times of Crisis | 02/18/2015 Unni Karunakara, Robert L. Klitzman Why were initial responses to the Ebola outbreak so disastrously inadequate? How can dysfunctional health systems--at all levels--be improved, so that this doesn't happen again? Dr. Klitzman of Columbia University and Dr. Karunakara, former international president of MSF, discuss these issues and more, including why doctors treating Ebola should not be called heroes.

Secularism and Liberalism in the Middle East: Conversation with Ahed Al Hendi (Syria) and Faisal Al-Mutar (Iraq) | 02/20/2015 David Keyes, Ahed Al Hendi, Faisal Saeed Al-Mutar How can the international community help human rights activists on the front lines? David Keyes and two dissidents discuss practical steps individuals can take.

A Conversation with Leon Botstein, President of Bard College and Champion of Liberal Arts Education | 02/09/2015 Leon Botstein, James Traub In this wide-ranging and entertaining conversation, Leon Botstein discusses Bard's innovative programs to serve the underserved, which include Bard high schools, prison education programs, and international operations; the marginalization of the humanities; and his refreshing and inclusive approach to classical music.

Flashpoints: The Emerging Crisis in Europe | 02/05/2015 George Friedman "Europe has always been a place of conflict and malice and anger and hatred, between classes and between nations. The question now is, can it be contained? I doubt it very much. The period from 1992 to 2008 was an interregnum, and an unnatural one. Europe is returning to itself, and when Europe gets sick, the world gets sick with it."

The Afghan Challenge | 01/26/2015 Zahir Tanin, Barnett Rubin With a new president in charge, can Afghanistan find a way out of decades of conflict and oppression? What will be the effect of the U.S. troop drawdown? UN Ambassador Zahir Tanin and Afghan expert Barnett Rubin discuss Afghanistan's future.

Extreme Political Parties in Greece: Economic and Cultural Factors | 01/22/2015 Yannis Palaiologos, David C. Speedie "There has been, in the period of the last 30 years especially, a breakdown of trust, not only between the governed and the government, but also between Greeks, among themselves." Palaiologos, a prominent Greek scholar-journalist, analyzes how Greece went wrong, the rise of extremist parties on both right and left, and what needs to be done.

Politics and Profits of Academia | 01/14/2015 Anant Agarwal, Sidni Mackenzie Frederick, Jason Lane, Julia Taylor Kennedy Even if universities are not for profit, budgets loom large in higher education--and global markets hold revenue potential. In this episode, we look at three ways universities are involved in global markets and how this can create ethical considerations and unintended consequences.

Top Risks and Ethical Decisions 2015 | 01/15/2015 Ian Bremmer "The world in 2015 looks a lot more dangerous, a lot more vulnerable," says global political risk specialist Ian Bremmer in his annual forecast. He notes that while the United States and China, the world's largest and second-largest economies, are doing better economically, the global environment is geopolitically much worse.

Unaccountable: A Conversation with Janine Wedel on how Elite Power Brokers have Corrupted the U.S. System | 01/07/2015 Janine R. Wedel, Andrew Nagorski Anthropologist Janine Wedel exposes America's "new corruption"--the unprecedented ways that many politicians, retired generals, academics, bankers, and physicians exploit their prestige and insider knowledge.

Introduction to "Ethics & International Affairs," Winter 2014 | 12/16/2014 Zach Dorfman In this podcast, Zach Dorfman introduces the winter 2014 issue of "Ethics & International Affairs." Topics include "cultures of humanitarianism" in East Asia; torture and norm death; an international crimes approach to preventing mass atrocities; Mathias Risse's "On Global Justice;" and Thomas Piketty's "Capital."

Money and American Politics: A Conversation with Lawrence Lessig | 12/22/2014 Lawrence Lessig, James Traub On a crusade against the corrupting influence of money in politics, Lawrence Lessig founded a "super PAC" which raised $10 million to support candidates committed to radical reform of campaign financing. Most of them lost, but Lessig is not daunted. He fights on, convinced that the majority of Americans agree with him and that change will come. 

The Rise of ISIS: Implications for U.S. Strategy, Interests, and Values | 12/17/2014 Audrey Kurth Cronin, Michèle Flournoy, Michael T. Flynn, Robert Ford How did ISIS grow so quickly? What is the best strategy to overcome it and how long will it take? How should the U.S. deal with Syria and Iran? Is this the beginning of a complete restructuring of the Middle East? This in-depth analysis from an expert panel shows that there are no easy answers, and a long struggle lies ahead.

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