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Please note that as of September 2011, we are posting highlights of event videos on this website, not the full videos. For videos in full from September 2011 onwards, please go to our UStream page.

Are We At War With Islam? | 04/17/2015 Jocelyne Cesari, David C. Speedie In Europe, both non-Muslims and Muslims need to honestly confront and contend with the stereotypes, anxieties, and resentments they have about each other, says Professor Cesari in this probing conversation on Muslims in Europe.

Ethical Systems Design: Bringing Behavioral Science Into Corporate Life | 04/13/2015 Sarah J. Dahlgren, Jack Ewing, Jonathan Haidt, Mark W. Olson, Ann Tenbrunsel, Julia Taylor Kennedy This is the first in a series of podcasts in collaboration with EthicalSystems.org to explore behavioral science in the workplace. In this installment, we're turning to the financial industry, specifically Deutsche Bank and the Federal Reserve, to explore how the financial system is beginning to apply behavioral economics to incentivize ethical decision-making.

Juan Cole on Europe's Muslims and More | 04/16/2015 Juan Cole, David C. Speedie In this enlightening conversation, Professor Cole, an expert in relations between the Muslim world and the West, gives an on-the-ground perspective on the Iran nuclear talks and the reaction to them in the Arab world, Muslims in Europe, Yemen, ISIS, and much more.

The Paradox of Liberation | 04/13/2015 Michael Walzer Many of the successful campaigns for national liberation after World War II were based on democratic and secular ideals. Michael Walzer asks: What went wrong? Why have states such as India, Israel, and Algeria been unable to reproduce their political culture beyond one or two generations?

Militarization in India & Beyond: Suchitra Vijayan & the Borderlands Project | 04/07/2015 Suchitra Vijayan, Alex Woodson What's it like to live in a disputed, militarized border region with a tangled history? In this fascinating podcast, Carnegie New Leader Suchitra Vijayan discusses two such places: Arunachal Pradesh, which lies along the Tibet/India border, and the much fought-over Kashmir. She also talks about her 2009 trip across Sudan.

P5 + 1 + Iran: Report on the Ongoing Nuclear Talks | 04/08/2015 Seyed Hossein Mousavian, David C. Speedie Speaking on the very day of the nuclear accord, Ambassador Mousavian explains why he believes the agreement is positive progress for both sides. And in a candid and forthright discussion with the audience, he explains the Iranian perspective on Israel, the U.S.-Israel relationship, ISIS, and also the workings of the Iranian government.

American Energy Challenges and Global Leadership in the Years Ahead | 04/06/2015 Helima Croft, John M. Deutch, David Gordon, Marc Lipschultz, Elizabeth Rosenberg Thanks to new technologies for extracting oil and natural gas, such as hydraulic fracturing ("fracking"), the United States is now the biggest producer of energy in the world. What do plummeting energy prices mean for sellers and consumers around the world--and what will be the likely consequences for climate change?

Introduction to "Ethics & International Affairs," Spring 2015 | 03/24/2015 Zach Dorfman In this podcast, Zach Dorfman introduces the spring 2015 issue of "Ethics & International Affairs." Topics include a symposium on imagining a "Drone Accountability Regime"; Liberia, Ebola, and the "Cult of Bankable Projects"; moral and political responsibility in world politics; and space, drones, and just war.

The Eleventh Hour: The Legacy and the Lessons of World War I | 03/24/2015 Charles M. Sennott One hundred years after the First World War, boundaries established after the armistice at the "eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month" still shape many of today's conflicts, from ISIS's invasion of Mosul to Boko Haram's kidnapping of schoolgirls. What lessons have we learned from WWI? Just as important, what have we still not learned?

The Kurdish Spring: A New Map of the Middle East | 03/20/2015 David L. Phillips In this stirring, information-filled talk on the Kurdish people, David Phillips recounts centuries of abuse and repression against the world's "largest stateless people." But he also illuminates the vitality of today's Kurds, who are "pro-Western and secular" and have proven to be America's most capable regional partners in the fight against ISIS.

Dual Legacy: The Effect of Business Thinking on the Social Sector | 03/05/2015 Steve Davis, Stanley N. Katz, Amber Kiwan, Darin McKeever, Tom Paulson, Julia Taylor Kennedy This month on "Impact," we're taking a close look at a huge issue--legacy. In this case, we're examining how it relates to contemporary philanthropy and the social sector in general. Specifically, we examine the $37-billion Gates Foundation's dual legacy in promoting global health, and in shaping the social sector at large.

Tourism, Farmers, & Technology in Africa: Eddie Mandhry from NYU Africa House | 03/04/2015 Eddie Mandhry, Alex Woodson "What's been amazing is that across Africa there is a movement where people are adopting technologies and leapfrogging some of the developmental stages that you'd have to go through," says Eddie Mandhry, Carnegie New Leader.

Nigeria and the Horror of Boko Haram | 03/09/2015 John Campbell "Like other radical insurgencies, Boko Haram is fueled by poor governance, political marginalization, and its region's deepening impoverishment," says former Ambassador to Nigeria John Campbell. "However, it is also shaped by specifically Nigerian circumstances and factors." This talk helps us understand Boko Haram's roots, ideology, and goals.

The United States, Russia, and Ukraine: Report from Moscow | 03/10/2015 Dmitri Trenin, David C. Speedie Dmitri Trenin, director of Carnegie Endowment's Moscow Center, served in the Soviet and Russian military for two decades and understands both the Russian and U.S. points of view. He warns that U.S.-Russia relations are heading for a new version of the Cold War, and also discusses the Russian economy and its relations with China and other countries.

Patients with Passports: Medical Tourism, Law, and Ethics | 03/02/2015 I. Glenn Cohen, Robert L. Klitzman Medical tourism is big business, involving millions of patients who travel abroad to get health care. Some travel to avoid queues and save money. Others seek services that are illegal in their own country, such as abortions and surrogate pregnancies. As Cohen explains, this growing industry opens a Pandora's box of legal and ethical questions.

Ebola and Other Viral Outbreaks: Providing Health Care to the Global Poor in Times of Crisis | 02/18/2015 Unni Karunakara, Robert L. Klitzman Why were initial responses to the Ebola outbreak so disastrously inadequate? How can dysfunctional health systems--at all levels--be improved, so that this doesn't happen again? Dr. Klitzman of Columbia University and Dr. Karunakara, former international president of MSF, discuss these issues and more, including why doctors treating Ebola should not be called heroes.

Secularism and Liberalism in the Middle East: Conversation with Ahed Al Hendi (Syria) and Faisal Al-Mutar (Iraq) | 02/20/2015 David Keyes, Ahed Al Hendi, Faisal Saeed Al-Mutar How can the international community help human rights activists on the front lines? David Keyes and two dissidents discuss practical steps individuals can take.

A Conversation with Leon Botstein, President of Bard College and Champion of Liberal Arts Education | 02/09/2015 Leon Botstein, James Traub In this wide-ranging and entertaining conversation, Leon Botstein discusses Bard's innovative programs to serve the underserved, which include Bard high schools, prison education programs, and international operations; the marginalization of the humanities; and his refreshing and inclusive approach to classical music.

Flashpoints: The Emerging Crisis in Europe | 02/05/2015 George Friedman "Europe has always been a place of conflict and malice and anger and hatred, between classes and between nations. The question now is, can it be contained? I doubt it very much. The period from 1992 to 2008 was an interregnum, and an unnatural one. Europe is returning to itself, and when Europe gets sick, the world gets sick with it."

The Afghan Challenge | 01/26/2015 Zahir Tanin, Barnett Rubin With a new president in charge, can Afghanistan find a way out of decades of conflict and oppression? What will be the effect of the U.S. troop drawdown? UN Ambassador Zahir Tanin and Afghan expert Barnett Rubin discuss Afghanistan's future.

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