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Introduction to "Ethics & International Affairs," Winter 2014 | 12/16/2014 Zach Dorfman In this podcast, Zach Dorfman introduces the winter 2014 issue of "Ethics & International Affairs." Topics include "cultures of humanitarianism" in East Asia; torture and norm death; an international crimes approach to preventing mass atrocities; Mathias Risse's "On Global Justice;" and Thomas Piketty's "Capital."

The Rise of ISIS: Implications for U.S. Strategy, Interests, and Values | 12/17/2014 Audrey Kurth Cronin, Michèle Flournoy, Michael T. Flynn, Robert Ford How did ISIS grow so quickly? What is the best strategy to overcome it and how long will it take? How should the U.S. deal with Syria and Iran? Is this the beginning of a complete restructuring of the Middle East? This in-depth analysis from an expert panel shows that there are no easy answers, and a long struggle lies ahead.

A Conversation with Lieutenant General H. R. McMaster | 12/15/2014 H. R. McMaster, Martin L. Cook How can U.S. soldiers be trained to maintain ethical and legal standards in today's complex and often brutal environment? How is the Army preparing for current and future conflicts, in terms of military hardware, technology, and even social media? In this wide-ranging talk, Lt. Gen. H. R. McMaster discusses these challenges and more.

An Introduction to Ebook of Roundtables from "Ethics & International Affairs" | 12/03/2014 Zach Dorfman, Madeleine Lynn In this podcast, Zach Dorfman introduces the Centennial collection of roundtables on the most critical issues facing the world today: the idea of a global ethic, just war, international peace, nuclear nonproliferation, the rule of law, human rights, and climate change. This ebook is free for a limited time!

The Business of Humanitarian Aid and Philanthropy: A Case Study | 12/04/2014 Gayle DiPietro, Rich Leimsider, Patrica L. Rosenfield, Piyush Tewari, Julia Taylor Kennedy By using a single organization, SaveLIFE Foundation in India, as a case study, this episode of Impact explores how NGOs in emerging markets adopt business language, metrics, and strategy, and what that says about our society's approach to humanitarian work.

America in Retreat: The New Isolationism and the Coming Global Disorder | 12/10/2014 Bret Stephens America is not in decline, but it's certainly in retreat, says Stephens, and this is a mistake. He argues that the United States is the ultimate guarantor of a relatively decent, stable, liberal world order, governed by a sense of rules and the knowledge, both among its friends and adversaries, that it has the will and the wherewithal to ensure its interests.

Strategies for Countering Violent Extremists | 12/05/2014 Jean-Paul Laborde, Joanne J. Myers Jean-Paul Laborde, executive director of the UN Security Council Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate (CTED) discusses the role of the UN in countering terrorism worldwide.

Outpost: Life on the Frontlines of American Diplomacy | 12/03/2014 Christopher Hill Former ambassador Hill has worked on some of the most dangerous and difficult problems in U.S. diplomacy, from the Balkans, to North Korea, to Iraq. In this astute and often funny talk, he gives an inside look at his work as a diplomat, and also discusses the latest crises, from ISIS and Syria, to Ukraine and dealing with Russia.

From "Indispensable Nation" to "Realism-Based Restraint": Reconsidering U.S. Engagement with the World | 11/24/2014 Chas W. Freeman, Jr., David C. Speedie Former ambassador Chas Freeman has had a wide breadth of diplomatic experience, from the Middle East to Africa, East Asia, and Europe. In this conversation he eloquently speaks his mind on the negative effects of sanctions, the folly of U.S. unqualified support for Israel, the U.S. strategy and diplomacy deficits, and much more.

Citizenship, Identity, and Conflict in South Asia's Borderlands | 11/20/2014 Suchitra Vijayan, Liana Sterling The intrepid Suchitra Vijayan is working on a 9,000-mile journey through South Asia, which has taken her to Afghanistan and Pakistan, the disputed territory of Kashmir, and India's borders with Burma and China. What has she learned so far about the effects of borders on human lives?

Heirs to Forgotten Kingdoms: Journeys Into the Disappearing Religions of the Middle East | 11/19/2014 Gerard Russell Despite its reputation for religious intolerance, the Middle East has long sheltered many distinctive faiths. How are groups such as the Mandaeans and Yazidis of Iraq, the Zoroastrians of Iran, and the Copts of Egypt hanging on to their ancient traditions? How can we combat religious hatred?

A Conversation with General Martin Dempsey, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff | 11/07/2014 Martin E. Dempsey, Jeffrey D. McCausland In this candid and thoughtful conversation, General Dempsey tackles the difficult questions, from ISIS to Ebola to cyber threats. And throughout, he stresses the importance of ethics, education, and service.

A Conversation with David Keyes on Advancing Human Rights | 11/14/2014 David Keyes, Andrew Nagorski In the Soviet era, it was difficult to alert the world of what was happening to dissidents, says David Keyes. Today, however, there's an overload of information from YouTube and other sources and the challenge is how to overcome "human rights fatigue." He explains how crowd-sourcing and other means can get the word out.

A Conversation with Will Kymlicka on the Challenges of Multiculturalism | 11/11/2014 Will Kymlicka, James Traub From Canada to Europe, how do different societies deal with immigrant groups? How have their policies evolved and where are they headed? What rights should domestic animals have? Will Kymlicka ably shows that the world is going through a rights revolution, demolishing the old hierarchies and gradually becoming more and more inclusive.

The Bright Side to Big Data: Good Intentions and Ethical Questions | 10/28/2014 James "Chip" R. Coldren, Jr., Seeta Peña Gangadharan, Alex "Sandy" Pentland, Joshua D. Rothman, Bruce Schneier, Viktor Mayer-Schönberger, Julia Taylor Kennedy We wrap up our three-part series on data and privacy with a look at some ways big data can improve our communities. Technology and big data are delivering some big payoffs for our culture and society, while also posing some of the greatest risks. How can big data promote social good? How might these efforts potentially introduce big ethical questions?

From Paris to Moscow: The Rise of New Far-Right Movements Across Europe | 10/31/2014 Marlene Laruelle, David C. Speedie What effect has the Ukraine crisis had on the rise of ultra-nationalist forces in Russia and what has been the impact on Russia's neighbors? What is the situation among Europe's different far-right movements? Russia/Eurasia/Europe expert Marlene Laruelle has answers to these complex questions and more.

If Mayors Ruled the World: Dysfunctional Nations, Rising Cities | 10/29/2014 Benjamin R. Barber, Joanne J. Myers In the face of the most perilous challenges of our time, from terrorism to climate change, nation-states seem paralyzed. Can cities and the mayors who run them do a better job? The answer is yes, says Benjamin Barber, and in fact they are already doing it.

The Shifts and the Shocks: What We've Learned--and Have Still to Learn--From the Financial Crisis | 10/23/2014 Martin Wolf Why did the 2008 financial crisis occur? What should it teach us about modern economies and economics? Martin Wolf does a masterly job of untangling this complex catastrophe and proposes how we can avoid repeating our past mistakes.

Global Ethics and the Point of View of the Universe | 11/07/2014 Peter Singer Sidgwick's concept of looking at issues from "the point of view of the universe"--in other words, giving equal weight to everyone's interests, irrespective of who they are, now or in future--can be the basis for a global ethic, says utilitarian philosopher Peter Singer. He goes on to explain what this means for all of us in practical, concrete terms.

Philip Alston on a World Court for Human Rights | 11/06/2014 Philip Alston, John Tessitore "The reason why governments are violating human rights on a grand scale is not because there is an absence of a world court," says Philip Alston. "The reason is that human rights culture has not taken off sufficiently in a great many countries." Instead, what's needed is first to develop regional mechanisms and then subsequently, regional courts.

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