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  • The Democratic Debate and Competing Narratives 01/24/20
    Nikolas K. Gvosdev
    As the Democratic field of presidential candidates narrows, the contenders are beginning to devote more attention to foreign policy and Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev has some important questions: Would Warren and Sanders stand by with their non-interventionist stances if they make it to the White House? Will climate change become a focus for any of the candidates?
  • Behind AI Decision-Making, with Francesca Rossi 01/23/20
    Francesca Rossi, Alex Woodson,
    With artificial intelligence embedded into social media, credit card transactions, GPS, and much more, how can we train it to act in an ethical, fair, and unbiased manner? What are the theories and philosophies behind AI systems? IBM Research's Francesca Rossi discusses her work helping to ensure that the technology is "as beneficial as possible for the widest part of the population."
  • Foreign Policy Narratives in Palm Beach 01/23/20
    Nikolas K. Gvosdev
    After an invitation to speak at a gathering of the Palm Beach chapter of the United Nations Association of the United States, U.S. Global Engagement Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev reflects on the current scope and direction of U.S. foreign policy. How will new uncertainties in the international system influence the relationships among the democratic community of nations?
  • Privacy, Surveillance, & the Terrorist Trap, with Tom Parker 01/14/20
    Tom Parker, Alex Woodson,
    How can investigators utilize new technology like facial recognition software while respecting the rights of suspects and the general public? What are the consequences of government overreaction to terrorist threats? Tom Parker, author of "Avoiding the Terrorist Trap," discusses privacy, surveillance, and more in the context of counterterrorism.
  • A Parting of Values: America First versus Transactionalism 01/13/20
    Nikolas K. Gvosdev
    "The existing divide in American foreign policy discourse has been the extent to which the U.S. must actively propagate and spread its values, or defend them or promote them even when there is no interest at stake," writes Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev. How does American civil society demand consideration of moral and ethical concerns in the decisions both to go to war and how the war will be prosecuted?
  • Suleimani Is Dead, but Diplomacy Shouldn't Be 01/08/20
    Philip Caruso
    Carnegie Council fellow and Pacific Delegate Philip Caruso advocates for the value of diplomacy in the aftermath of the U.S. killing Iran's general Qassem Suleimani. "Iran cannot win a war against the United States, nor can the United States afford to fight one," he argues. This article was originally published in "Foreign Policy" and is posted here with kind permission.
  • Soleimani and the Democratic Primary Electorate 01/06/20
    Nikolas K. Gvosdev
    In the aftermath of the U.S. drone strike on the commander of Iran's Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps, General Qassem Soleimani, senior fellow Nikolas Gvosdev studies the responses of the Democratic primary candidates. To what degree and scope do they see America's involvement and engagement in the world?
  • Gene Editing, Slow Science, & Public Empowerment, with Françoise Baylis 12/18/19
    Françoise Baylis, Alex Woodson,
    In the fourth podcast in Carnegie Council's gene editing podcast series, Dalhousie University's Professor Françoise Baylis, author of "Altered Inheritance," explains what "slow science" and "broad societal consensus" mean when it comes to this technology. She also details why public empowerment is vital for ethical gene editing and wonders if some of these procedures will stay in the realm of science fiction.
  • Loisach Group and the Democratic Community Narrative 12/11/19
    Nikolas K. Gvosdev
    Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev reports from the Berlin meetings of the Losiach Group, a U.S.-German strategic dialogue, where the trans-Atlantic relationship and the rise of China are important points of discussion. Could countering China be the basis of a new Euro-American conneciton?
  • The Ethics of Gene Editing & Human Enhancement, with Julian Savulescu 12/11/19
    Julian Savulescu, Alex Woodson,
    What does "good ethics" means when it comes to gene editing? What types of conversations should we be having about this technology? Julian Savulescu, director of the Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics, shares his thoughts on these topics and more, including moral and human enhancement, and why he called Dr. He Jiankui's experiment "monstrous."
  • Vox Populi, Eurasia Group Foundation, and Narratives 12/10/19
    Nikolas K. Gvosdev
    The Eurasia Group Foundation (EGF) has released its report on public attitudes towards U.S. foreign policy. Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev notes that, like the project on U.S. Global Engagement at the Carnegie Council, EGF is attempting to get at the twin issues of "the chasm which exists between the interests and concerns of foreign policy elites and those of ordinary citizens" and "the reasons why Americans are increasingly disenfranchised from foreign policy decisions being made in Washington."
  • Gene Editing Governance & Dr. He Jiankui, with Jeffrey Kahn 12/02/19
    Jeffrey Kahn, Alex Woodson,
    Jeffrey Kahn, director of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute for Bioethics, discusses the many governance issues connected to gene editing. Plus, he gives a first-hand account of an historic conference in Hong Kong last year in which Dr. He Jiankui shared his research on the birth of the world's first germline genetically engineered babies. What's the future of the governance of this emerging technology?

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