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  • The Korean Peninsula: One of America’s Greatest Foreign Policy Challenges, with Christopher R. Hill 12/14/18
    Christopher R. Hill
    There are few, if any, who understand the Korean Peninsula situation better than Ambassador Hill. He served as U.S. ambassador to South Korea and assistant secretary of state for East Asian and Pacific affairs, and was head of the U.S. delegation to the 2005 six-party talks aimed at resolving the North Korean nuclear crisis. In this wise and witty talk he explains where we are today, how we got here, and where we're likely to go in the future.
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Foreign Policy After the Midterms, with Nikolas Gvosdev 12/13/18
    Alex Woodson, Nikolas K. Gvosdev,
    Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev and host Alex Woodson discuss the state of foreign policy after the midterm elections. How can newcomers like Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez have a tangible effect in Washington? Will Democrats be able to unite behind a platform? Plus, they look ahead to 2020 and speak about Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren, and Nikki Haley and how American values will play into the future of international relations.
  • Russia's Information Warfare, with Molly McKew 12/12/18
    Molly McKew, Devin T. Stewart,
    "You saw the Russians start to pay attention to social media, in particular after Obama's election, because the way that he was elected was new to them. They always watch our elections very closely. So you see them toying around in this whole space of the sphere of information, the use of information as a tool of political warfare, developing new tools." Molly McKew delves into Russian disinformation campaigns in the U.S. and elsewhere.
  • Breaking News: The Remaking of Journalism and Why It Matters Now, with Alan Rusbridger 12/10/18
    Alan Rusbridger
    "Were we a business, were we a mission, were we a public service, or were we a profit center?" Alan Rusbridger, former editor-in-chief of "The Guardian," grapples with the questions facing all newspapers in this new age where people "communicate horizontally" rather than via the old, vertical "tablet of stone model." He explains how "The Guardian" has not only survived but prospered and has surprisingly positive things to say about new media.
  • Control and Responsible Innovation of Artificial Intelligence 12/07/18
    Francesca Rossi, Stuart Russell, Bart Selman, Wendell Wallach,
    Artificial Intelligence's potential for doing good and creating benefits is almost boundless, but equally there is a potential for doing great harm. This panel discusses the findings of a comprehensive three-year project at The Hastings Center, which encompassed safety procedures, engineering approaches, and legal and ethical oversight.
  • It's Time for the U.S. and Chinese Militaries to Cooperate on HADR 12/06/18
    Austin McKinney
    Relations between the U.S. and China are at their lowest point in decades. Joint Humanitarian and Disaster Response (HADR) would provide an effective mechanism to improve military-to-military engagement between the U.S. and China. The Philippines offers an attractive partner for the U.S. and China to build and operate under a joint-HADR framework for military cooperation,
  • Global Ethics Weekly: The End of World War I & the Future of American Democracy, with Ted Widmer 12/06/18
    Ted Widmer, Alex Woodson,
    Historian and Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Ted Widmer looks back to the end of the First World War, and the upheaval that followed it in Europe and the U.S., and forward to a new stage in the Trump presidency. Plus, he and host Alex Woodson discuss ways to improve American democracy and what can be learned from the legacy of President George H. W. Bush.
  • The Jungle Grows Back: America and Our Imperiled World, with Robert Kagan 12/06/18
    Robert Kagan
    "The analogy that is at the heart of this book is about a jungle and a garden," says Robert Kagan. "In order to have a garden and sustain a garden, you've got to be constantly gardening. For me at least, that is a good analogy for this liberal world order, which itself is an unnatural creation which natural forces are always working to undermine." Human nature has not fundamentally changed, and this peaceful period is an aberration.
  • Enemy of the People: Trump's War on the Press, with Marvin Kalb 12/05/18
    Marvin Kalb
    Trump has a love-hate relationship with the press, which he calls "the enemy of the people" when it crosses him, knowing nothing of the origins of the phrase, says Marvin Kalb. Yet the pillars of democracy are the sanctity of the court and the freedom of the press. "I think that President Trump—not wittingly, unwittingly—is moving this nation away from our common understanding of democracy toward something that edges toward authoritarianism."
  • Misconnecting with the U.S. Public: Narrative Collapse and U.S. Foreign Policy 12/05/18
    Nikolas K. Gvosdev, Asha Castleberry, Colin Dueck, Simran Maker, Maia Otarashvili, Joel H. Rosenthal, Kori Schake, Tatiana Serafin, Devin T. Stewart, John Unger, Ali Wyne,
    For the past year, the U.S. Global Engagement program has focused its attention on the continuing strengths and weaknesses of the narratives that can be used to support an active U.S. role within the global system. These questions have been discussed both within the work of a small study group as well as through a series of focus meetings around the country. Here is the group's interim report.
  • Refining Strategic Autonomy: A Call for European Grand Strategy 12/05/18
    Cameron Vaské
    Europe has come to realize that the United States is no longer the stalwart ally of the Cold War era. With the resurgence of China, the return of Russia, the retreat of the United States, and the rise of the rest, Europe needs to define its own grand strategy.
  • Breaking News: The Remaking of Journalism and Why It Matters Now, with Alan Rusbridger 12/04/18
    Alan Rusbridger
    "Were we a business, were we a mission, were we a public service, or were we a profit center?" Alan Rusbridger, former editor-in-chief of "The Guardian," grapples with the questions facing all newspapers in this new age where people "communicate horizontally" rather than via the old, vertical "tablet of stone model." He explains how "The Guardian" has not only survived but prospered and has surprisingly positive things to say about new media.

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