Ethics & International Affairs Volume 18.2 (Fall 2004): Humanitarian Aid and Intervention: The Challenges of Integration: Informing the Integration Debate with Recent Experience [Full Text]

Sep 24, 2004

The overriding challenge faced by policy-makers in the post–Cold War era is not, as many would have us believe, the achievement of integration of humanitarian action into the prevailing politico-military context. It is rather the protection of its independence. The debate, rather than focusing on fitting humanitarian action more snugly into the given political framework, should explore how to ensure the indispensable independence of humanitarian actors from that framework. The experience of the Humanitarianism and War Project, an action-oriented research and publications initiative studying humanitarian activities in post–Cold War conflicts, suggests the essential elements of such independence.

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