Ethics & International Affairs Volume 1 (1987): Articles "Ethics & International Affairs" Vol. 1: Rubberband Humanitarianism [Abstract]

Dec 2, 1987

Humanitarian action is always complicated by, but often blind to, its political influence. The intimacy of these two spheres of activity calls into question the basis of what political administrations deem humanitarianism. Unavoidably, definitional problems arise. These problems were exacerbated by the Reagan administration's insistence that non-military aid to the Contras in Nicaragua should be described as humanitarian. Bruce Nichols explores the way in which the concept of humanitarian aid has been stretched beyond recognition for political ends.

To read or purchase the full text of this article, click here.

You may also like

U.S. Army soldiers in Iraq, March 2008. CREDIT: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/soldiersmediacenter/2340862578">The U.S. Army</a> <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/">(CC)</a>

JAN 27, 2020 Podcast

Just War, Unjust Soldiers, & American Public Opinion, with Scott D. Sagan

Do soldiers fighting for a "just cause" have more rights than soldiers fighting on the other side? In this interview following up on an "Ethics & ...

JAN 4, 2022 Journal

Ethics & International Affairs Volume 35.4 (Winter 2021)

The issue features a book symposium organized by Michael Blake on Anna Stilz's "Territorial Sovereignty," with contributions from Adom Getachew; Christopher Heath Wellman; and Michael ...

United States President James Monroe presides over a cabinet meeting, 1823. CREDIT: <a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:James_Monroe_Cabinet.jpg">Granger Historical Picture Archive/Wikimedia</a> <a href="https://creativecommons.org/share-your-work/public-domain/">(Public Domain)</a>

MAR 30, 2021 Article

Learning (Ethical) Lessons from the Greek Revolution

In this blog post, U.S. Global Engagement Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev reacts to an article from Paul Glastris in the "Washington Monthly." Nearly 200 years ...