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  • A Thousand Small Sanities: The Moral Adventure of Liberalism, with Adam Gopnik
    05/22/2019
    In his eloquent defense of liberalism, Adam Gopnik goes back to its origins and argues that rather than being emphasizing the role of the individual, "two principles, the principle of community and the principle of compromise," are at the core of the liberal project. Indeed, these are the essential elements of humane, pluralist societies; and in an age of autocracy, our very lives may depend on their continued existence.
    05/22/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Crack-Up: The Amritsar Massacre & India's Independence Movement, with Gyan Prakash
    05/15/2019
    Princeton's Gyan Prakash tells the tragic story of the Amritsar Massacre in 1919, in which a British general ordered his soldiers to shoot at thousands of unarmed civilians, and its galvanizing effect on the Indian independence movement. Was this violence an "exceptional" moment in Britain's colonial history? And how did it change Gandhi's thinking in relation to his strategies to resist colonialism?
    05/15/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • 100 Years After Versailles
    05/14/2019
    Just weeks after an armistice halted the most devastating conflict in generations, the victors of the Great War set out to negotiate the terms of the peace--and to rewrite the rules of international relations. A century later, we live in a world shaped by the Treaty of Versailles. In this fascinating discussion, a panel of distinguished historians delve into the complex situation on the ground at the time and the Treaty's legacy today, from Europe and the U.S. to Asia and the Middle East.
    05/14/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Citizenship, Social Media, & the Indian Election, with Kavitha Rajagopalan
    05/01/2019
    Senior Fellow Kavitha Rajagopalan discusses the ongoing Indian election through the complicated lens of citizenship and explains the vast power of political organizing and social media in the "world's largest democracy." What's at stake if Prime Minister Narendra Modi (the frontrunner) wins reelection? How have he and the BJP been able to push Hindu nationalism? What does voter disenfranchisement look like in India?
    05/01/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Liberal Democracy, Empathy, & AI, with Alexander Görlach
    03/28/2019
    In this wide-ranging talk, Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Alexander Görlach discusses the importance of empathy in liberal democracies, the shocking Uyghur detention in China, and how AI is affecting all facets of society. What does liberalism look like in 2019? How will technology change democracy and religion?
    03/28/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Crack-Up: Egypt & the Wilsonian Moment, with Erez Manela
    03/26/2019
    For about 18 months after World War I there was what historian Erez Manela calls the "Wilsonian moment"--a brief period when President Woodrow Wilson led people around the world to believe that he would champion a new world order of self-determination and rights for small nations. How did this actually play out, particularly in the case of Egypt, which was a British Protectorate at the time?
    03/26/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Crack-Up: 1919 & the Birth of Modern Korea, with Kyung Moon Hwang
    03/14/2019
    Could the shared historical memory of March 1 ever be a source of unity between North Koreans and South Koreans? In this fascinating episode of The Crack-Up series that explores how 1919 shaped the modern world, Professor Kyung Moon Hwang discusses the complex birth of Korean nationhood and explains how both North and South Korea owe their origins and their national history narratives to the events swirling around March 1, 1919.
    03/14/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Living in an "Illiberal Democracy"
    03/12/2019
    "Today, virtually all countries make claim to democracy, even conspicuous dictatorships such as the Democratic People's Republic of Korea," writes Gergely Bérces from Hungary. "Reality, however, increasingly consists of citizens of ostensibly democratic countries sacrificing their freedoms, violating human rights, and, paradoxically, extinguishing democracy-—their own and those of others—-in the name of democracy."
    03/12/19Publications
  • Censorship in China, with BuzzFeed's Megha Rajagopalan
    03/11/2019
    After working in China for six years on many stories unfavorable to the Chinese government, in 2018 journalist Megha Rajagopalan's visa was not renewed, forcing her to leave China abruptly. Why? She's still not sure and says that the government uses ambiguity very deliberately, causing Chinese and foreigners alike to self-censor, as they don't know where the lines are. How does this affect the flow of information and Chinese society as a whole?
    03/11/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Jerome A. Cohen on the Taiwan Relations Act
    02/20/2019
    U.S.-Taiwan relations have long been an ingenious balancing act of "strategic ambiguity." What does the 1979 Taiwan Relations Act entail and why is it important, not only to Taiwan, but to U.S.-China relations and indeed security across Asia? Legendary China expert Jerome Cohen unpacks the history of Taiwan since 1895, its current situation and legal status, and what this could mean for Asia and the United States.
    02/20/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Carnegie Council Presents "The Crack-Up," a Podcast Series about the Pivotal Year of 1919
    02/12/2019
    Created and hosted by historian and Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Ted Widmer, "The Crack-Up" is a special podcast series about the events of 1919, a turbulent year that in many ways shaped the 20th century and the modern world. Widmer is working with The "New York Times" on a series of long features on the legacy of 1919 and these podcasts are designed to complement the articles by interviewing each of the authors.
    02/12/19NewsPress Releases
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Violence & Nationalism in India & the U.S., with Suchitra Vijayan
    01/31/2019
    As founder and executive director of the Polis Project, a research and journalism organization, Suchitra Vijayan is helping to document a concerning trend of identity-based violence in India. She discusses her organization's work on this issue, the violence's connection to a rise in nationalism in India since Prime Minister Modi came to power, and some imperfect parallels with the contentious political climate in the United States.
    01/31/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Crack-Up: Ireland's Quest for Self-Determination, with Christopher L. Pastore
    01/30/2019
    In the third podcast in The Crack-Up series, which looks at how 1919 shaped the modern world, Ted Widmer discusses the story of the Irish Declaration of Independence with fellow historian Christopher Pastore. Although the declaration was signed in 1919, Ireland's quest for self-determination would last for decades. How did America influence these developments? What did the Irish leaders think about nationalism so soon after World War I?
    01/30/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • 1919 & the Crack Up, with Ted Widmer
    01/17/2019
    Created and hosted by Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Ted Widmer, "The Crack-Up" is a special podcast series about the events of 1919, a year that in many ways shaped the 20th century and the modern world. And throughout 2019, "The New York Times" will be running long features on the legacy of 1919. These videos explain why 1919 was such an important year, what "the crack-up" means, and previews upcoming essays and podcasts.
    01/17/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: 1919 & the Modern World, with Ted Widmer
    01/17/2019
    Historian Ted Widmer discusses his new Carnegie Council podcast series "The Crack-Up" and how 1919 has shaped the modern world. He and host Alex Woodson speak about parallels to 2019, Woodrow Wilson and the League of Nations, Babe Ruth, the early days of Hollywood, and populism in Europe in the aftermath of World War I. Don't miss a new "Crack-Up" tomorrow with Harvard historian Lisa McGirr on prohibition and the American state.
    01/17/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Crack-Up: Teddy Roosevelt's Complicated Legacy, with Patty O'Toole
    01/08/2019
    This podcast is part of "The Crack-Up," a special series about the events of 1919, a year that in many ways shaped the 20th century and the modern world. In this episode, host Ted Widmer speaks with fellow historian Patty O'Toole about her "New York Times" article on Teddy Roosevelt, who died 100 years ago this week. Why was health care reform so important to him? What did he think about nationalism? How would TR fit in with the modern GOP?
    01/08/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Living Legacy of the First World War
    11/19/2018
    Five Fellows from "The Living Legacy of the First World War" project present their work. Their talks cover the history of war-induced psychological trauma and how it has been dealt with in the U.S. military; the impact of the defense industry's profit motive on U.S. foreign policy; haunting photos of severely facially disfigured soldiers; the legacy of press censorship during WWI; and the humanitarianism of Jane Addams.
    11/19/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Myanmar and the Plight of the Rohingya, with Elliott Prasse-Freeman
    11/16/2018
    The Rohingya are seen as fundamentally 'other,' says Prasse-Freeman. "Hence, even if they have formal citizenship, they wouldn't really be accepted as citizens, as full members of the polity." Could Aung San Suu Kyi have done more to prevent the persecution? How important was the hate speech on Facebook? How can the situation be resolved? Don't miss this informative and troubling conversation.
    11/16/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Education for Peace: The Living Legacy of the First World War
    11/07/2018
    Four Fellows from Carnegie Council's "The Living Legacy of WWI" project present their research on different aspects of the war--counterterrorism, airpower, chemical warfare, and Latin America--and its long-term impacts. The panel was part of the Carnegie Peacebuilding Conversations, a three-day program at the Peace Palace in The Hague, Netherlands, presented in cooperation with Carnegie institutions worldwide and other partners.
    11/07/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Wellbeing in Northern Ireland, 20 Years After the Good Friday Agreement, with Senator George J. Mitchell
    10/22/2018
    "Much has been said and written about the long and difficult road that led us to the Agreement in April of 1998. Many have deservedly received credit for their roles, but the real heroes of the Agreement were the people and the political leaders of Northern Ireland," declares Senator George Mitchell, who played a leading role in the Belfast Good Friday Agreement. Don't miss this moving and very personal speech.
    10/22/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts

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