• Trump is the Symptom, Not the Problem
    11/22/2019
    Astute observers of U.S. foreign policy have been making the case, as we move into the 2020 elections, not to see the interruptions in the flow of U.S. foreign policy solely as a result of the personality and foibles of the current occupant of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, writes Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev. Ian Bremmer and Colin Dueck expand on this thought.
    11/22/19Publications
  • The Individual & the Collective, Politics, & the UN, with Jean-Marie Guéhenno
    10/21/2019
    Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Jean-Marie Guéhenno, former head of United Nations peacekeeping operations, discusses the tensions between the individual and the collective in a world filled with political tension, pervasive surveillance, and fear of risk. What is the role of the UN in this environment? How can we avoid the violent upheavals that marked other transitional phases in humanity?
    10/21/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Power of Tribalism, with Amy Chua & Walter Russell Mead
    10/10/2019
    "In our foreign policy, for at least half a century, we have been spectacularly blind to the power of tribal politics," says Amy Chua, author of "Political Tribes: Group Instinct and the Fate of Nations." What does this mean in 2019? How can Americans move past tribalism? Don't miss this conversation with Chua and Bard College's Walter Russell Mead, moderated by Bard's Roger Berkowitz.
    10/10/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Transactionalism and U.S. Foreign Aid
    09/09/2019
    A draft of a new presidential directive on American foreign aid suggests that transactionalism will shift from being a rhetorical device to an actual defining principle. How will the continued departure from the pre-2016 bipartisan consensus impact the foreign aid community?
    09/09/19Publications
  • Back to School with Carnegie Council's New High School Resources
    08/30/2019
    With the new school year in mind, Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs has added timely new high school materials to its extensive online education section. Carnegie Council created high school level world and U.S. history resources based on opinion pieces from "The New York Times" "1919: The Year of the Crack Up" series and Carnegie Council senior fellow Ted Widmer's accompanying podcast.
    08/30/19NewsPress Releases
  • Ethical Considerations in a Trade War with China
    08/20/2019
    Are there ethical considerations that need to be factored in as part of assessing the merits of a "trade war" with the People's Republic of China?
    08/20/19Publications
  • Beyond Trump
    08/20/2019
    Some countries are now coming to the same conclusions reached by the U.S. Global Engagement program: the 2016 election was not a "blip," but represents a break with the past. "In other words, no foreign government should bank on getting a better shake post-Trump."
    08/20/19Publications
  • Book Review: Northern Ireland’s Ghosts, Living in Plain Sight
    08/19/2019
    Even though much of the fighting in Northern Ireland has subsided, how has the lack of true reconciliation in the region influenced its society? This book review of Patrick Radden Keefe's "Say Nothing: A True Story of Murder and Memory in Northern Ireland" was originally published by the Carnegie Corporation of New York and is reposted with kind permission.
    08/19/19Publications
  • Democratic Candidates and Foreign Policy
    07/31/2019
    Which foreign policy narratives have emerged from the 2020 Democratic presidential candidates? Will it be restorationist, democratic community, America First, retrenchment/redefinition, reindustrialization/regeneration, or climate change focused? How expansive or restrictive is their conception of the demos?
    07/31/19Publications
  • The Romanian Diaspora's Impact on European Stability
    06/27/2019
    The results of last month's European Parliament elections and justice referendum in Romania "delivered a humiliating blow to its ruling populist coalition," writes journalist Teodor Stan. The vote also shows the impact a diaspora can have, especially one as large as Romania's, which is estimated at over 4 million. There is a lot to learn about transnational politics, liberalism, and diasporas by taking a closer look at Romanian politics.
    06/27/19Publications
  • The Crack-Up: A Hundred Years of Student Protests in China, with Jeffrey Wasserstrom
    06/17/2019
    In the latest "Crack-Up" podcast, China expert Jeffrey Wasserstrom discusses the rich history of Chinese student protests. From the May Fourth movement in 1919 to Tiananmen Square in 1989 to today's mass demonstrations in Hong Kong, what are the threads that tie these moments together? Don't miss this fascinating talk, which also touches on Woodrow Wilson, the Russian Revolution, and a young Mao Zedong.
    06/17/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • How to Lose a Country: The 7 Steps from Democracy to Dictatorship, with Ece Temelkuran
    06/03/2019
    In her new book, award-winning Turkish novelist and political commentator Ece Temelkuran lays out the seven steps from democracy to dictatorship. "Some of these steps might be invisible to people even when they are living in it," she says, "so I wanted to make sure that people of the world, especially Western societies, can see what is happening to them so they won't lose time like we did in Turkey. I hope they won't end up losing their country as we did."
    06/03/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • China, the Olympics, & Influence, with Bethany Allen-Ebrahimian
    05/31/2019
    Washington DC-based journalist Bethany Allen-Ebrahimian speaks with Senior Fellow Devin Stewart about a new article she authored in "The Atlantic" with Senior Fellow Zach Dorfman that traces China's influence campaigns today back to techniques used during the 2008 Beijing Olympics. They discuss that article's origins, its findings, and what they mean for public opinion on China.
    05/31/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Rebuilding the Narrative: Recreating the Rationale for U.S. Leadership, with Ash Jain
    05/24/2019
    There is skepticism about the core values of U.S. policy from both sides, says Ash Jain of the Atlantic Council, and the international order is under siege as never before. The Atlantic Council has launched an initiative aimed at revitalizing the rules-based democratic order and rebuilding bipartisan support among policymakers and the broader public. In this important discussion Jain explains the initiative's objectives and grapples with the audience's questions on how to move forward.
    05/24/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Millennials, Climate Change, & Foreign Policy, with Nikolas Gvosdev
    05/23/2019
    Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev discusses the generational divide in U.S. politics in the context of foreign policy and the environment. What are the international implications of initiatives like the Green New Deal? What would an "America First" environmental policy look like? And what happens if the U.S. continues to take a backseat on this issue?
    05/23/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • A Thousand Small Sanities: The Moral Adventure of Liberalism, with Adam Gopnik
    05/22/2019
    In his eloquent defense of liberalism, Adam Gopnik goes back to its origins and argues that rather than emphasizing the role of the individual, the principles of community and compromise are at the core of the liberal project. Indeed, these are the essential elements of humane, pluralist societies; and in an age of autocracy, our very lives may depend on their continued existence.
    05/22/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Crack-Up: The Amritsar Massacre & India's Independence Movement, with Gyan Prakash
    05/15/2019
    Princeton's Gyan Prakash tells the tragic story of the Amritsar Massacre in 1919, in which a British general ordered his soldiers to shoot at thousands of unarmed civilians, and its galvanizing effect on the Indian independence movement. Was this violence an "exceptional" moment in Britain's colonial history? And how did it change Gandhi's thinking in relation to his strategies to resist colonialism?
    05/15/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • 100 Years After Versailles
    05/14/2019
    Just weeks after an armistice halted the most devastating conflict in generations, the victors of the Great War set out to negotiate the terms of the peace--and to rewrite the rules of international relations. A century later, we live in a world shaped by the Treaty of Versailles. In this fascinating discussion, a panel of distinguished historians delve into the complex situation on the ground at the time and the Treaty's legacy today, from Europe and the U.S. to Asia and the Middle East.
    05/14/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Citizenship, Social Media, & the Indian Election, with Kavitha Rajagopalan
    05/01/2019
    Senior Fellow Kavitha Rajagopalan discusses the ongoing Indian election through the complicated lens of citizenship and explains the vast power of political organizing and social media in the "world's largest democracy." What's at stake if Prime Minister Narendra Modi (the frontrunner) wins reelection? How have he and the BJP been able to push Hindu nationalism? What does voter disenfranchisement look like in India?
    05/01/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Liberal Democracy, Empathy, & AI, with Alexander Görlach
    03/28/2019
    In this wide-ranging talk, Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Alexander Görlach discusses the importance of empathy in liberal democracies, the shocking Uyghur detention in China, and how AI is affecting all facets of society. What does liberalism look like in 2019? How will technology change democracy and religion?
    03/28/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts

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