Peter Maass

Author and Journalist

Peter Maass is a journalist and author, currently contributing to The New York Times Magazine. He has also written for The New Yorker, The New Republic, The Atlantic Monthly, Outside, and Slate, among other outlets.

Maass spent many years as a foreign correspondent, based first in Europe, then in Asia, and then in Eastern Europe, where he covered the war in Bosnia. He has also been on assignment in Iraq to cover the war there.

He is the author of Love Thy Neighbor: A Story of War (1996), which won The Los Angeles Times Book Prize and the Overseas Press Club Book Prize, and Crude World: The Violent Twilight of Oil (2009).

Featured Work

Crude World: The Violent Twilight of Oil

OCT 6, 2009 Podcast

Crude World: The Violent Twilight of Oil

From Ecuador to Nigeria, in most oil-producing countries oil has not brought any benefits to the poor and has often damaged people's health and ruined ...

The New Killing Fields: Massacre and the Politics of Intervention

OCT 16, 2002 Podcast

The New Killing Fields: Massacre and the Politics of Intervention

Humanitarian intervention does not "belong in the shadows" because it has the moral urgency of self-defense, which puts it ahead of preventive war, say Walzer ...

The New Killing Fields: Massacre and the Politics of Intervention

OCT 16, 2002 Podcast

The New Killing Fields: Massacre and the Politics of Intervention

Humanitarian intervention does not "belong in the shadows" because it has the moral urgency of self-defense, which puts it ahead of preventive war, say Walzer ...

The New Killing Fields: Massacre and the Politics of Intervention

OCT 16, 2002 Podcast

The New Killing Fields: Massacre and the Politics of Intervention

Humanitarian intervention does not "belong in the shadows" because it has the moral urgency of self-defense, which puts it ahead of preventive war, say Walzer ...

The New Killing Fields: Massacre and the Politics of Intervention

OCT 16, 2002 Transcript

The New Killing Fields: Massacre and the Politics of Intervention

Humanitarian intervention does not "belong in the shadows" because it has the moral urgency of self-defense, which puts it ahead of preventive war, say Walzer ...