Welcome to the Carnegie Council Video Podcast. You can watch highlights from all our events by subscribing below or go to YouTube.com/carnegiecouncil to watch full videos and clips.

Ill Winds: Saving Democracy from Russian Rage, Chinese Ambition, and American Complacency, with Larry Diamond | 06/28/19
Larry Diamond's core argument is stark: the defense and advancement of democratic ideals relies on U.S. global leadership. If the U.S. does not reclaim its traditional place as the keystone of democracy, today's authoritarian trend could become a tsunami that could provide an opening for Vladimir Putin, Xi Jinping, and their admirers to turn the 21st century into a dark time of surging authoritarianism.

Speech Police: The Global Struggle to Govern the Internet, with David Kaye | 06/20/19
The original idea of the Internet was for it be a "free speech nirvana," but in 2019, the reality is quite different. Authoritarians spread disinformation and extremists incite hatred, often on the huge, U.S.-based platforms, YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter. David Kaye, UN special rapporteur on freedom of opinion & expression, details the different approaches to these issues in Europe and the United States and looks for solutions in this informed and important talk.

A Debate: Political Science is Lapsing into Irrelevance, with Michael Desch & Henry Farrell | 06/17/19
What is the current state of the academic-policy gap and why should we care? What progress has been made in bridging this gap? What more can be done? Notre Dame's Michael Desch, founding director of the Scowcroft Institute of International Affairs, and George Washington's Henry Farrell, an editor and writer at the "Washington Post"-affiliated "Monkey Cage" blog, engage in a thoughtful and spirited debate on the relevance of political science today.

China's Political Influence on Democracies, with Sarah Cook & Isaac Stone Fish | 06/05/19
China is radically expanding its strategy to wield influence in the domestic politics of other countries. This information campaign is designed partly to bolster China's power but also to undermine the space for rights and democracy in other states, and to potentially support pro-China authoritarian leaders. Don't miss this in-depth discussion that details how this is happening worldwide, what it means for the future, and what we can do about it.

Rebuilding the Narrative: Recreating the Rationale for U.S. Leadership, with Ash Jain | 05/29/19
There is skepticism about the core values of U.S. policy from both sides, says Ash Jain of the Atlantic Council, and the international order is under siege as never before. The Atlantic Council has launched an initiative aimed at revitalizing the rules-based democratic order and rebuilding bipartisan support among policymakers and the broader public. In this important discussion Jain explains the initiative's objectives and grapples with the audience's questions on how to move forward.

A Thousand Small Sanities: The Moral Adventure of Liberalism, with Adam Gopnik | 05/28/19
In his eloquent defense of liberalism, Adam Gopnik goes back to its origins and argues that rather than being emphasizing the role of the individual, "two principles, the principle of community and the principle of compromise," are at the core of the liberal project. Indeed, these are the essential elements of humane, pluralist societies; and in an age of autocracy, our very lives may depend on their continued existence.

Civic Responsibility in the Internet Age, with Michael H. Posner | 05/21/19
Historian Ted Widmer and Michael Posner, an NYU Stern professor and former U.S. State Department official, discuss local politics, journalism, and money in elections in the age of ubiquitous Internet connectivity. How can high school students get involved in democracy? What are some ideas to save the media industry? How can--or should--the government regulate the social media giants? Don't miss this wide-ranging talk.

100 Years After Versailles | 05/20/19
Just weeks after an armistice halted the most devastating conflict in generations, the victors of the Great War set out to negotiate the terms of the peace--and to rewrite the rules of international relations. A century later, we live in a world shaped by the Treaty of Versailles. In this fascinating discussion, a panel of distinguished historians delve into the complex situation on the ground at the time and the Treaty's legacy today, from Europe and the U.S. to Asia and the Middle East.

The Presidents: Noted Historians Rank America's Best—and Worst—Chief Executives, with Brian Lamb | 05/08/19
What lessons can we learn from America's past presidents? Can these lessons help us choose the next one wisely? In this timely talk, C-Span founder Brian Lamb explains how C-Span came about and discusses "The Presidents," which draws on four decades of interviews with noted presidential historians. From Abraham Lincoln to James Buchanan, this book teaches much about what makes a great leader--and what does not.

How Change Happens, with Cass Sunstein | 04/26/19
From the French Revolution to the Arab Spring to #MeToo, how does social change happen? In a book that was 25 years in the making, Cass Sunstein unpacks this puzzle by exploring the interplay of three decisive factors. Don't miss this insightful talk. It may change how you view the world.

Human Rights, Liberalism, & Ordinary Virtues, with Michael Ignatieff | 04/22/19
Central European University's President Michael Ignatieff is a human rights scholar, an educator, a former politician, and, as he tells us, the son of a refugee. He discusses what he calls "the ordinary virtues," such as patience and tolerance; the status of human rights today and the dilemmas of migration; the essential critera for true democracy; and the ideal curriculum. His advice to students: Learn to think for yourself.  

From Gutenberg to Google: The History of Our Future, with Tom Wheeler | 04/11/19
We've been through information and technology revolutions before, going back to Gutenberg, says former chairman of the FCC Tom Wheeler. Now it's our turn to be at a terminus of history and the rules that worked for industrial capitalism are probably no longer adequate for Internet capitalism. So our task is not to flee but to stand up, recognize the challenge, and deal with it.

Global Ethics Weekly: Liberal Democracy, Empathy, & AI, with Alexander Görlach | 04/03/19
In this wide-ranging talk, Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Alexander Görlach discusses the importance of empathy in liberal democracies, the shocking Uyghur detention in China, and how AI is affecting all facets of society. What does liberalism look like in 2019? How will technology change democracy and religion?

How Safe Are We? Homeland Security Since 9/11, with Janet Napolitano | 04/02/19
"Climate, cyber, then mass gun violence, sometimes motivated by terrorist ideology--and the ideology can most frequently be tied to far-right-wing extremism, sometimes tied to no ideology at all, sometimes tied to pathology. Those three things I think are the real risks that the Department [of Homeland Security] really should be focused on. In contrast, what is not a real risk is the conditions of the Southwest border."

The New Rules of War: Victory in the Age of Durable Disorder, with Sean McFate | 03/26/19
"Nobody fights conventionally except for us anymore, yet we're sinking a big bulk, perhaps the majority of our defense dollars, into preparing for another conventional war, which is the very definition of insanity," declares national security strategist and former paratrooper Sean McFate. The U.S. needs to recognize that we're living in an age of "durable disorder"--a time of persistent, smoldering conflicts--and the old rules no longer apply.

Challenges to American Democracy, with Michael Waldman | 03/13/19
"We're all really proud of our system. It's the world's oldest democracy, and we've always had to fight to make it real," says Michael Waldman of the Brennan Center for Justice. "But in the last 10-20 years and especially recently we've seen challenges to the right to vote and challenges to the role of big money in politics. That means we have to fight for democracy all over again." What can young people do to help get our democracy back?

The Enduring False Promise of Preventive War, with Scott A. Silverstone | 02/28/19
Does preventive war really work? "In the vast majority of cases historically, what we see is the country that thought it was saving itself from a greater danger in the future actually creates this greater danger because you generate a level of hostility, a deepening rivalry, and a desire for revenge that comes back to haunt them," says Scott Silverstone. His advice: Hesitate. Before taking action, think through this "preventive war paradox."

The Future is Asian, with Parag Khanna | 02/19/19
"The rise of China is not the biggest story in the world," says Parag Khanna. "The Asianization of Asia, the return of Asia, the rise of the Asian system, is the biggest story in the world." This new Asian system, where business, technology, globalization, and geopolitics are intertwined, stretches from Japan to Saudi Arabia, from Australia to Russia, and Indonesia to Turkey, linking 5 billion people.

The Free Speech Century, with Lee Bollinger & Geoffrey Stone | 02/11/19
The Supreme Court's 1919 decision in "Schenck v. United States" is one of the most important free speech cases in American history. Because of it we have an elaborate set of free speech laws and norms, but the context is always shifting. In this fascinating talk Bollinger and Stone explore how our understanding of the First Amendment has been transformed over time, and how it may change in the future to cope with social media and other challenges.

Red Flags: Why Xi's China is in Jeopardy, with George Magnus | 02/05/19
China's economy has grown exponentially over the last four decades, but George Magnus, former chief economist at UBS, sees four traps that could derail its continued rise: rising debt, the struggle to keep its currency stable, aging demographics, and the challenges of changing from a low-income economy to a complex middle-income one. Will Xi Jinping be open to reform? What could be the effects of lingering U.S.-China trade tensions?

Ian Bremmer & Tom Nichols on Globalization, Populism, & American Politics | 01/31/19
If populism is a reaction to a globalism that is viewed as unresponsive to the needs of citizens, can populism sustain any version of globalization? Eurasia Group's Ian Bremmer and Tom Nichols of the U.S. Naval War College discuss and debate this important question and much more.

Top Risks and Ethical Decisions 2019, with Ian Bremmer | 01/24/19
The wide array of global issues--more than 90 percent of them--that Eurasia Group follows are now headed in the wrong direction in 2019. Eurasia Group president Ian Bremmer break down those risks--from U.S.-China relations and cyberwar to European populism and American institutions--and their ethical implications with Carnegie Council's Devin Stewart for their 11th annual discussion of the year's coming top risks.

The Perfect Weapon: War, Sabotage, and Fear in the Cyber Age, with David Sanger | 01/22/19
From the U.S. operation against Iran's nuclear enrichment plant, to Chinese theft of personal data, North Korea's financially motivated attacks on American companies, or Russia's interference in the 2016 election, cyberweapons have become the weapon of choice for democracies, dictators, and terrorists. "New York Times" national security correspondent David Sanger explains how and why cyberattacks are now the number one security threat.

The Korean Peninsula: One of America’s Greatest Foreign Policy Challenges, with Christopher R. Hill - Video Highlights | 12/20/18
There are few, if any, who understand the Korean Peninsula situation better than Ambassador Hill. He served as U.S. ambassador to South Korea and assistant secretary of state for East Asian and Pacific affairs, and was head of the U.S. delegation to the 2005 six-party talks aimed at resolving the North Korean nuclear crisis. In this wise and witty talk he explains where we are today, how we got here, and where we're likely to go in the future.

Control and Responsible Innovation of Artificial Intelligence - Video Highlights | 12/18/18
Artificial Intelligence's potential for doing good and creating benefits is almost boundless, but equally there is a potential for doing great harm. This panel discusses the findings of a comprehensive three-year project at The Hastings Center, which encompassed safety procedures, engineering approaches, and legal and ethical oversight.

Breaking News: The Remaking of Journalism and Why It Matters Now, with Alan Rusbridger - Video Highlights | 12/10/18
"Were we a business, were we a mission, were we a public service, or were we a profit center?" Alan Rusbridger, former editor-in-chief of "The Guardian," grapples with the questions facing all newspapers in this new age where people "communicate horizontally" rather than via the old, vertical "tablet of stone model." He explains how "The Guardian" has not only survived but prospered and has surprisingly positive things to say about new media.

The Jungle Grows Back: America and Our Imperiled World, with Robert Kagan - Video Highlights | 12/06/18
"The analogy that is at the heart of this book is about a jungle and a garden," says Robert Kagan. "In order to have a garden and sustain a garden, you've got to be constantly gardening. For me at least, that is a good analogy for this liberal world order, which itself is an unnatural creation which natural forces are always working to undermine." Human nature has not fundamentally changed, and this peaceful period is an aberration.

Enemy of the People: Trump's War on the Press, with Marvin Kalb - Video Highlights | 12/05/18
Trump has a love-hate relationship with the press, which he calls "the enemy of the people" when it crosses him, knowing nothing of the origins of the phrase, says Marvin Kalb. Yet the pillars of democracy are the sanctity of the court and the freedom of the press. "I think that President Trump—not wittingly, unwittingly—is moving this nation away from our common understanding of democracy toward something that edges toward authoritarianism."

Reckless: Henry Kissinger and the Tragedy of Vietnam, with Robert K. Brigham - Video Highlights | 10/30/18
Henry Kissinger is smart, charming, and a great writer, says historian Robert Brigham. But when it came to Vietnam, his arrogance and deceit made a bad situation worse. Kissinger altered the logbooks for military bombings and misled the president on the content of the secret talks in Paris. "He was a theorist who stuck to theorist dreams, and it cost the country dearly." What are the lessons for today's administration?

Fight for Liberty, with Max Boot, Philip Bobbitt, Garry Kasparov, & Bret Stephens - Video Highlights | 10/26/18
We live in a time when liberal democracy is on the defensive, not only in the U.S. but around the world. Yet these speakers, whose roots reflect the political spectrum, are optimistic that having a fresh discussion on moral values and basic principles such as freedom of speech, a free press, and the rule of law can help bring democracy back to health. Don't miss this valuable discussion.

The Nationalist Revival: Trade, Immigration, and the Revolt Against Globalization, with John B. Judis - Video Highlights | 10/24/18
Why has nationalism suddenly returned with a vengeance around the world? Why are nationalists so angry about free trade and immigration? Why has globalization become a dirty word? In this insightful talk, John B. Judis has some answers to these questions--and prescriptions for the United States.

The Future of U.S. National Security, with Derek Reveron | 10/23/18
"Is it still fair to say there are continuities in foreign policy two years into the Trump administration? I'm going to say yes, and I'll offer some evidence," declares Derek S. Reveron of the U.S. Naval War College and Harvard Kennedy School. Don't miss this expert analysis of America's role in the world.

All Options Are on the Table: Threats and Coercive Diplomacy in Foreign Affairs | 10/05/18
Are there ever justifiable reasons for issuing threats to achieve foreign policy objectives? In particular, are President Trump's threats against Iran justified? Don't miss this rare opportunity to get the Iranian perspective with this stimulating discussion between Drs. Reichberg and Syse of the Peace Research Insitute Oslo (PRIO) and H.E. Gholamali Khoshroo, permanent representative of Iran to the United Nations.

Making Foreign Policy Relevant Again, with Asha Castleberry & Ali Wyne - Video Highlights | 10/02/18
Has a gap opened up between the U.S. national security community and the general public over foreign policy? If so, why? How can we close it? Moderated by Nikolas Gvosdev, this panel with foreign policy experts Asha Castleberry and Ali Wyne is part of a larger effort by Carnegie Council's U.S. Global Engagement Program to examine drivers in U.S. politics pushing the United States to disengage from international affairs.

Identity: The Demand for Dignity and the Politics of Resentment, with Francis Fukuyama | 09/24/18
The rise of global populism is the greatest threat to global democracy, and it's mainly driven not by economics, but by people's demand for public recognition of their identities, says political scientist Francis Fukuyama. "We want other people to affirm our worth, and that has to be a political act." How is this playing out in the U.S., Europe, and Asia? What practical steps can we take to counteract it?

Russian Soft Power in France, with Marlene Laruelle & Jean-Yves Camus - Video Highlights | 07/09/18
It's important to understand that Russia and France have had a centuries-long relationship which is mostly positive, say French scholars Marlene Laruelle and Jean-Yves Camus. Today there are layers of close economic and cultural ties, as well as common geopolitical interests, and the French extreme right and Russia share many of the same conservative values. Thus the remarkable strength of Russian influence in France is not surprising.

Would the World Be Better Without the UN? with Thomas G. Weiss - Highlights | 06/28/18
Thomas Weiss, a leading expert on the history and politics of the United Nations, gives incontrovertible evidence of the UN's achievements, such as the eradication of smallpox, but also details where the organization has fallen short. This is a critical time for all multilateral organizations and treaties, he stresses, as Trump has no regard for international cooperation.

Restoring Trust: How Can the American Public Regain its Confidence in its National Security Apparatus? - Video Highlights | 06/27/18
There is a huge divide in the way Americans assess U.S. foreign policy. Take for example, the June G7 meeting, which ended in a clash between Trump and some of America's closest allies: Some say it was a disaster; others say Trump did the right thing. Where do we go from here to restore trust in expertise and government? Don't miss this fascinating conversation with two leading commentators, Colin Dueck and Kori Schake.

Climate Change and the Power to Act: An Ethical Approach for Practical Progress | 06/21/18
Robyn Eckersley, Ronny Jumeau, Darrel Moellendorf, and Suma Peesapati each discuss how we can advance climate justice globally and locally in the years ahead. These clips summarize the participants' comments made as part of a roundtable hosted by the Carnegie Council's journal, Ethics & International Affairs, at the International Studies Association's Annual Convention, which took place in April 2018.

HATE: Why We Should Resist It with Free Speech, Not Censorship, with Nadine Strossen - Video highlights | 06/19/18
Nadine Strossen gives a rousing, detailed, and convincing defense of free speech as it is laid out in the First Amendment. "American law really is nuanced and makes a great deal of common sense," she says and while censorship of 'hate speech' in other countries is certainly well-intended, in practice the laws have proven to do more harm than good.

Why Ethics Matter in International Affairs - Video highlights | 06/14/18
How can you ensure that ethics are a core component, not only of an international affairs education, but of graduates' performance once they go out in the field? In this event for students and alumni of the Elliott School of International Affairs, the School's Dean Brigety and Professors Nolan and Kojm, along with Carnegie Council President Rosenthal, discuss the thorny issues of ethics, leadership, and practice in international relations.

Clip of the Month: Dignity, Human Rights, & Ethics, with Nadine Strossen | 06/13/18
Last week, former ACLU President Nadine Strossen gave a powerful talk on her new book "HATE: Why We Should Resist It with Free Speech, Not Censorship." Throughout the presentation, Strossen offered an unqualified endorsement of free speech in response to hatred and discrimination. In this clip, Strossen, now a professor at New York Law School, uses Carnegie Council's mission statement to make the case for inalienable human rights and the moral responsibility “to raise our voices to counter hateful, discriminatory, and stereotyped ideas.”

Democracy Promotion in the Age of Trump - Video highlights | 06/06/18
In this panel Adrian Basora makes a strong case for democracy as not only promoting American values but also serving U.S. interests, while Maia Otarashvili gives a frightening overview of the rise of "illiberal values" (Viktor Orbán's phrase) in the Eurasia region. Basora and Otarashvili are co-editors of "Does Democracy Matter? The United States and Global Democracy Support" and Nikolas Gvosdev is one of the contributors.

From Cold War to Hot Peace: An American Ambassador in Putin's Russia, with Michael McFaul - Highlights | 06/01/18
As Obama's adviser on Russian affairs, Michael McFaul helped craft the United States' policy known as "reset" that fostered new and unprecedented collaboration between the two countries. Then, as U.S. ambassador to Russia from 2012-2014, he had a front-row seat when this fleeting moment crumbled with Vladimir Putin's return to the presidency. "It's tragic," he says. "How is it that we have come back to something close to the Cold War?"

Army of None: Autonomous Weapons and the Future of War, with Paul Scharre - Video highlights | 05/31/18
What are the ethical implications of autonomous weapons? Can artificial intelligence adequately mirror human judgement? Paul Scharre, director of the Technology and National Security Program at the Center for a New American Security, sets out to answer these questions.

Clip of the Month: Ethical Implications of Autonomous Weapons, with Paul Scharre | 05/30/18
What will future wars look like? As technology and artificial intelligence advance quickly, the possibility that machines could independently select and engage targets without human intervention is fast approaching. Former U.S. Army Ranger Paul Scharre illustrates the complex ethical questions behind these new weapons with the story of when his sniper team encountered a little girl in the mountains of Afghanistan, walking with her goats. Can we use this new technology without losing our humanity in the process?

Poverty Reduction & Social Welfare in China, with Qin Gao - Video highlights | 05/04/18
Professor Qin Gao, director of Columbia's China Center for Social Policy, explains the workings of the Chinese "Dibao" (limited income guarantee) system. "Dibao is doing relatively better than many other similar programs in developing countries," says Gao, yet it has limitations and some negative aspects. She also discusses Xi Jinping's ambitious goal to eradicate poverty by 2020, and the benefits of a Universal Basic Income (UBI)system.

Promoting Human Rights in the Developing World, with American Jewish World Service's Robert Bank - Video highlights | 05/03/18
Growing up in Apartheid-era South Africa, Robert Bank cared about social injustice from an early age. Today he travels the world for AJWS, working with local activists on a range of issues such as women's rights in India and LGBT rights in Uganda. "My job—very much like a conductor of an orchestra in some way—is to ensure that every instrument has its beautiful voice heard and that this melody is given the opportunity to really soar."

The Peacemakers: Leadership Lessons from Twentieth-Century Statesmanship, with Bruce Jentleson - Video highlights | 05/02/18
What are the qualities and conditions that enable people to become successful peacemakers? At a time when peace seems elusive and conflict endemic, Bruce Jentleson makes a forceful and inspiring case for the continued relevance of statesmanship and diplomacy and provides practical guidance to 21st-century leaders seeking lessons from some of history's most accomplished negotiators, activists, and trailblazers.

On Grand Strategy, with John Lewis Gaddis - Video highlights | 04/27/18
Are there such things as timeless principles of grand strategy? If so, are they always the same across epochs and cultures? What can we learn from reading the classics, such as Thucydides, Sun Tzu, and Clausewitz? "The fox knows many things, but the hedgehog knows one big thing," according to Isaiah Berlin. Which type makes better strategists, or do you need to be a bit of both? John Lewis Gaddis has some wise and thoughtful answers.

The People vs. Democracy: Why Our Freedom Is in Danger and How to Save It, with Yascha Mounk - Highlights | 04/26/18
Harvard's Yascha Mounk argues that liberalism and democracy are coming apart, creating new forms of illiberal democracy (democracy without rights) and undemocratic liberalism (rights without democracy). Populist leaders are flourishing; indeed, Hungary is on the verge of descending into dictatorship, with shamefully little criticism from the Europe or the U.S. What are the causes of this phenomenon? What can we do about it?

Clip of the Month: Leadership Strategy, Foxes, & Hedgehogs | 04/25/18
For over two decades, John Lewis Gaddis has co-taught a legendary seminar in strategic thinking at Yale. Drawing on lessons from history and the classics from Thucydides to Lincoln to FDR, Professor Gaddis warns his students against leaders who dare to improvise and those who do not listen or learn. In this clip, Professor Gaddis explains how a "grand strategy" works in the real world. Referencing Isaiah Berlin's famous essay, who is more primed for success: the fox who knows many things or the hedgehog who knows one big thing?

The Dangers of a Digital Democracy, with Rana Foroohar - Video highlights | 04/09/18
The revelations about the misuse of Facebook data have started a pushback against the top five big tech companies: Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Netflix, and Google. How do approaches to privacy and data use differ in the U.S., Europe and China? What kind of transparency should we demand? How will AI affect workers? All this and more in a lively and informative discussion with author and "Financial Times" columnist Rana Foroohar.

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