Did you miss one of our events? Do you live too far away to attend? Are you a professor who wants your class to listen to Nobel laureates speaking on issues of world peace and global social justice? No problem. Audio recordings of the Carnegie Council events are now available through Really Simple Syndication (RSS) and as a podcast in the Apple iTunes Music Store. Both sources are free and include the same selections of our best recent events.

Current Feed: http://www.carnegiecouncil.org/resources/audio/rss/feed.xml

  |   Audio Podcast  |  Video Podcast

Roadmap to Hell: Sex, Drugs and Guns on the Mafia Coast, with Barbie Latza Nadeau | 05/24/18
Barbie Latza Nadeau, Joanne J. Myers
Rome-based journalist Barbie Latza Nadeau tells the horrifying story of the thousands of Nigerian women and girls duped into being trafficked to Italy, where they are forced to become sex slaves, drug mules, or weapons smugglers. How can this be stopped? The Nigerian government turns a blind eye, Libya, the transit point, is a failed state, and Italy is overwhelmed by the sheer numbers of migrants--plus prostitution is legal there.

The Rohingya Crisis in Bangladesh, with BRAC's Muhammad Musa | 05/22/18
Muhammad Musa, Devin T. Stewart
Muhammad Musa is executive director of BRAC, which is working with the one million Rohingya refugees living in camps in Bangladesh. He describes the problems there, including growing tensions with the host community and the threat of the coming monsoon season, which may bring floods and landslides. He looks forward to the day when the Rohingya can go home to Myanmar, but this can only occur with the help of the international community.

Democracy Promotion in the Age of Trump | 05/22/18
Adrian A. Basora, Maia Otarashvili, Nikolas K. Gvosdev
In this panel Adrian Basora makes a strong case for democracy as not only promoting American values but also serving U.S. interests, while Maia Otarashvili gives a frightening overview of the rise of "illiberal values" (Viktor Orbán's phrase) in the Eurasia region. Basora and Otarashvili are co-editors of "Does Democracy Matter? The United States and Global Democracy Support" and Nikolas Gvosdev is one of the contributors.

The Living Legacy of WWI: The Legacy of American Press Censorship in World War I, with Charles Sorrie | 05/22/18
Charles Sorrie, Reed Bonadonna
The popular memory of WWI today was basically engineered through propaganda and censorship during the war itself, says Charles Sorrie. Those involved in any war need convincing reasons why they are fighting. "There needs to be almost some sort of slogan. The one that was developed at that time, that America was fighting mostly for democracy or for freedom, is one that is still used today in popular history and in popular culture."

Climate Change and the Power to Act: An Ethical Approach for Practical Progress | 05/17/18
Janos Pasztor, Robyn Eckersley, Darrel Moellendorf, Ronald Jumeau, Suma Peesapati
We are already living with climate change; and although countries have pledged to limit global warming to 2 °C, success seems highly unlikely. This panel explores how to advance ethical leadership on climate justice globally, nationally, and locally in the years ahead. Topics include the Paris Agreement and commitments going forward, geoengineering governance, the problems in California, and the creative ways the Seychelles are coping.

Greed, Movies, and Capitalism with Ethicist John Paul Rollert | 05/17/18
John Paul Rollert , Devin T. Stewart
Every capitalist economy struggles with how to come to terms with greed, says John Paul Rollert, an expert on the intellectual history of capitalism. He describes how our perspective has changed from the Christian view of greed as an unalloyed sin, to the 18th century idea that it could bring positive benefits, to the unabashed "Greed is good" ethos in the movie "Wall Street." Where do we stand now? How can we rehabilitate capitalism?

Global Ethics Forum Preview: Plutopia: Nuclear Families in Atomic Cities, with Kate Brown | 05/17/18
Kate Brown, Stephanie Sy
Next time on Global Ethics Forum, University of Maryland Baltimore County's Professor Kate Brown details the ethical, social, and health costs of nuclear power since World War II. In this excerpt Brown, author of "Plutopia," and journalist Stephanie Sy discuss the little-known Cold War era nuclear production plants in the Soviet Union and Washington State.

The Living Legacy of WWI: Forgotten Aspects of the Western Hemisphere & WWI, with Richard Millett | 05/15/18
Richard Millett, Reed Bonadonna
"Unknown to the rest of America, we had one regiment of Puerto Ricans in Puerto Rico which was totally integrated. The rest of the military was segregated, and the Puerto Rican regiment was integrated." Military historian Richard Millett discusses some surprising and neglected aspects of the Hispanic experience in World War I, along with the war's impact on the United States' relationship with its Latin American allies.

From Cold War to Hot Peace: An American Ambassador in Putin's Russia, with Michael McFaul | 05/14/18
Michael McFaul
As Obama's adviser on Russian affairs, Michael McFaul helped craft the United States' policy known as "reset" that fostered new and unprecedented collaboration between the two countries. Then, as U.S. ambassador to Russia from 2012-2014, he had a front-row seat when this fleeting moment crumbled with Vladimir Putin's return to the presidency. "It's tragic," he says. "How is it that we have come back to something close to the Cold War?"

"End of an Era" in China, with Carl Minzner | 05/10/18
Carl Minzner, Devin T. Stewart
"I'm not making an argument that Maoism is coming back; we're very far away from that. But the crucial thing to recognize is just what we had known as characterizing the reform era is going away, and China is shifting into a more personalized authoritarian regime and one which is more closed with respect to outside influence. For me, I think when you see those things happening it makes you worried about what's the next norm that starts to break."

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