Did you miss one of our events? Do you live too far away to attend? Are you a professor who wants your class to listen to Nobel laureates speaking on issues of world peace and global social justice? No problem. Audio recordings of the Carnegie Council events are now available through Really Simple Syndication (RSS) and as a podcast in the Apple iTunes Music Store. Both sources are free and include the same selections of our best recent events.

Current Feed: http://www.carnegiecouncil.org/resources/audio/rss/feed.xml

  |   Audio Podcast  |  Video Podcast

Piety and Public Opinion: Understanding Indonesian Islam, with Tom Pepinksy | 03/22/18
Tom Pepinsky, Devin T. Stewart
Are there differences in political, social, and economic attitudes among Indonesians--and Indonesian Muslims in particular--based on their levels of religious piety? Intriguingly, Tom Pepinsky and his fellow researchers found that the answer is no; piety is not the deciding factor. Pepinsky also examines Indonesia's approach toward minority rights, which he defines as tolerance for group rights but not for individual rights.

Global Ethics Forum Preview: China, Climate Change, & the Environment, with Elizabeth Economy | 03/22/18
Elizabeth Economy, Stephanie Sy
Next time on Global Ethics Forum, Council on Foreign Relations Senior Fellow Elizabeth Economy discusses China’s complicated relationship with environmentalism. In this excerpt, Economy tells Stephanie Sy how Chinese leadership’s approach toward climate change has evolved in the last few decades.

The Origins of Happiness, with Richard Layard | 03/21/18
Richard Layard, Joanne J. Myers
Today we can accurately measure happiness and we know much more about its causes, says Professor Layard. It turns out that getting richer is often not enough for real happiness. So now, instead of just looking at GDP, many policymakers around the world are focusing on how to raise the level of people's satisfaction with their lives, including their mental and physical health, for example.

The Case for Universal Basic Income, with Andrew Yang | 03/21/18
Andrew Yang, Stephanie Sy
Automation is causing the greatest shift in human history and will put millions of Americans out of work, says entrepreneur and 2020 presidential candidate Andrew Yang. His solution? Put human values before GDP and provide a universal basic income of $1,000 a month, funded by a 10 percent value-added tax (VAT). This is not a government program, he argues, but a dividend given to we the people, who are the owners of this country.

European Futures in the Shadow of American Disengagement, with Andrew Michta | 03/16/18
Andrew Michta, Nikolas K. Gvosdev
Europe is going through deep structural changes, says Andrew Michta of the George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies. He argues that it may become "a "Europe of clusters," where countries even within the EU will align themselves differently depending on their economic or security interests. In any case, these shifts are largely driven by internal factors such as the migration crisis, not by U.S. policy towards Europe.

The Return of Marco Polo's World, with Robert D. Kaplan | 03/16/18
Robert D. Kaplan
If you wish to understand the depth and breadth of the geographical, historical, technological, and political forces that are shaping our world, there is no better guide than Robert Kaplan. Using Marco Polo's journey as "a geographical framing device for Eurasia today," he examines China's ambitious One Belt One Road project, dissecting China's imperial dream and its multiple, under-reported objectives.

Global Ethics Forum Preview: Rescue: Refugees and the Political Crisis of Our Time, with David Miliband | 03/15/18
David Miliband
Next time on Global Ethics Forum, International Rescue Committee president David Miliband discusses the moral tragedy of the refugee crisis and what the West needs to do. In this excerpt, Miliband brings up the moral, strategic, and historic reasons for caring about the world’s 65 million refugees.

The U.S. Foreign Service and the Importance of Professional Diplomacy, with Nicholas Kralev | 03/15/18
Nicholas Kralev, Stephanie Sy
Professional diplomats are made not born, says Nicholas Kralev of the Washington International Diplomatic Academy. It's not enough to be a people person: training is needed in specific skills. Sadly, many Americans don't realize how diplomats' successes or failures can affect their own security and prosperity. Even U.S. presidents often don't appreciate the Foreign Service. And under Trump, State Department professionals are leaving in droves.

Fighting Threats to Philippine Democracy, with Joy Aceron | 03/14/18
Joy Aceron, Devin T. Stewart
"Despite the vibrancy of civil society, political and economic power continues to be in the hands of very few people in the Philippines. In fact, there are statistics that would say that if you want to make one important policy decision, you only have to talk to about 40 people because that is where power is concentrated." Joy Aceron, of G-Watch talks politics, press freedom, and civil society in this info-packed podcast.

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