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Did you miss one of our events? Do you live too far away to attend? Are you a professor who wants your class to listen to Nobel laureates speaking on issues of world peace and global social justice? No problem. Audio recordings of the Carnegie Council events are now available through Really Simple Syndication (RSS) and as a podcast in the Apple iTunes Music Store. Both sources are free and include the same selections of our best recent events.

Current Feed: https://www.carnegiecouncil.org/resources/audio/rss/feed.xml

  |   Audio Podcast  |  Video Podcast

Control and Responsible Innovation of Artificial Intelligence | 12/07/18
Francesca Rossi, Stuart Russell, Bart Selman, Wendell Wallach
Artificial Intelligence's potential for doing good and creating benefits is almost boundless, but equally there is a potential for doing great harm. This panel discusses the findings of a comprehensive three-year project at The Hastings Center, which encompassed safety procedures, engineering approaches, and legal and ethical oversight.

Global Ethics Weekly: The End of World War I & the Future of American Democracy, with Ted Widmer | 12/06/18
Ted Widmer, Alex Woodson
Historian and Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Ted Widmer looks back to the end of the First World War, and the upheaval that followed it in Europe and the U.S., and forward to a new stage in the Trump presidency. Plus, he and host Alex Woodson discuss ways to improve American democracy and what can be learned from the legacy of President George H. W. Bush.

Breaking News: The Remaking of Journalism and Why It Matters Now, with Alan Rusbridger | 12/04/18
Alan Rusbridger
"Were we a business, were we a mission, were we a public service, or were we a profit center?" Alan Rusbridger, former editor-in-chief of "The Guardian," grapples with the questions facing all newspapers in this new age where people "communicate horizontally" rather than via the old, vertical "tablet of stone model." He explains how "The Guardian" has not only survived but prospered and has surprisingly positive things to say about new media.

Global Ethics Weekly: Women's Employment & Working in a War Zone, with Mariel Davis | 11/29/18
Mariel Davis, Alex Woodson
Education for Employment's Mariel Davis discusses some of the many issues surrounding women's employment in the Middle East and North Africa, focusing on the story of a young Palestinian working in the hospitality industry. Plus, she details the struggles of working--and trying to work--in war-torn Yemen.

The Jungle Grows Back: America and Our Imperiled World, with Robert Kagan | 11/20/18
Robert Kagan
"The analogy that is at the heart of this book is about a jungle and a garden," says Robert Kagan. "In order to have a garden and sustain a garden, you've got to be constantly gardening. For me at least, that is a good analogy for this liberal world order, which itself is an unnatural creation which natural forces are always working to undermine." Human nature has not fundamentally changed, and this peaceful period is an aberration.

Myanmar and the Plight of the Rohingya, with Elliott Prasse-Freeman | 11/16/18
Elliott Prasse-Freeman, Devin T. Stewart
The Rohingya are seen as fundamentally 'other,' says Prasse-Freeman. "Hence, even if they have formal citizenship, they wouldn't really be accepted as citizens, as full members of the polity." Could Aung San Suu Kyi have done more to prevent the persecution? How important was the hate speech on Facebook? How can the situation be resolved? Don't miss this informative and troubling conversation.

Global Ethics Weekly: The Right to Science, with Helle Porsdam | 11/15/18
Helle Porsdam, Alex Woodson
The right to benefit from scientific progress was enshrined in the United Nations' 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights, explains University of Copenhagen's Professor Helle Porsdam. Unfortunately, many people, including scientists and policymakers, don't know much about it. How was the right to science developed? What are examples? And, with an anti-science administration in the White House today, what are the contentious issues?

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