• India in the 21st Century: What Everyone Needs to Know, with Mira Kamdar
    What are the challenges that will have the most impact on India's future? Award-winning author Mira Kamdar puts climate change and environmental degradion at the top of the list, including rising sea levels and scarcity of resources. Next is the problem of poverty and unemployment--India has to generate nearly a million new jobs a month for young people joining the workforce. Kamdar also discusses the rise of Hindu nationalism and much more.
    07/02/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Rohingya Crisis in Bangladesh, with BRAC's Muhammad Musa
    Muhammad Musa is executive director of BRAC, which is working with the one million Rohingya refugees living in camps in Bangladesh. He describes the problems there, including growing tensions with the host community and the threat of the coming monsoon season, which may bring floods and landslides. He looks forward to the day when the Rohingya can go home to Myanmar, but this can only occur with the help of the international community.
    05/22/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Promoting Human Rights in the Developing World, with American Jewish World Service's Robert Bank
    Growing up in Apartheid-era South Africa, Robert Bank cared about social injustice from an early age. Today he travels the world for AJWS, working with local activists on a range of issues such as women's rights in India and LGBT rights in Uganda. "My job—very much like a conductor of an orchestra in some way—is to ensure that every instrument has its beautiful voice heard and that this melody is given the opportunity to really soar."
    05/02/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Return of Marco Polo's World, with Robert D. Kaplan
    If you wish to understand the depth and breadth of the geographical, historical, technological, and political forces that are shaping our world, there is no better guide than Robert Kaplan. Using Marco Polo's journey as "a geographical framing device for Eurasia today," he examines China's ambitious One Belt One Road project, dissecting China's imperial dream and its multiple, under-reported objectives.
    03/16/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Ethics & International Affairs Volume 32.1 (Spring 2018)
    The heart of this Special Issue is a roundtable on the theme of "Rising Powers and the International Order," with contributions from G. John Ikenberry, Shiping Tang, Anne L. Clunan, Deepa M. Ollapally, Ole Wæver, and Andrew Hurrell. Each essay in the collection examines the future of the global order from the perspective of one or more major rising powers, as well as the EU and the United States. The issue also contains an essay on golden visas and the marketization of citizenship by Ayelet Shachar; a review essay on eliminating corruption by Gillian Brock; and book reviews from Kevin Macnish, Colleen Murphy, Brigit Toebes, and Steven Vanderheiden.
    03/09/18Publications Ethics & International Affairs
  • Just Out: "Ethics & International Affairs" Spring 2018 Issue
    The heart of this Special Issue is a roundtable on the theme of "Rising Powers and the International Order." Each essay in the collection examines the future of the global order from the perspective of one or more major rising powers, as well as the EU and the United States.
    03/09/18NewsPress Releases
  • Political Tribes: Group Instinct and the Fate of Nations, with Amy Chua
    "The United States today is starting to display destructive political dynamics much more typically associated with developing countries: ethno-nationalist movements, the erosion of trust in our institutions and electoral outcomes, and above all, the transformation of democracy into an engine of zero-sum political tribalism."
    03/07/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Gandhi's Satyagraha & Social Change, with Sujata Gadkar-Wilcox
    Satyagraha, one of Gandhi's most influential teachings, stresses "passive resistance" in the face of injustice. Qunnipiac's Gadkar-Wilcox saw a powerful example of this in regards to a debate in India over sanitary napkins and she also sees it as Florida high school students push legislators for stricter gun control. Why is this tactic or "disposition" so effective?
    02/26/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • "Modern Slavery" with Siddharth Kara
    In his third book on slavery, which took 16 years of research, Siddharth Kara calculates that there are roughly 31 million slaves worldwide, at least half of them in South Asia. We need to apply much more resources and compassion to end "this horrible indignity."
    01/30/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Moral Leadership Missing in Burma, with Ambassador Derek Mitchell
    Former ambassador to Burma Derek Mitchell examines the complex situation there, including the roots of the ongoing Rohingya crisis and China's influence there. Aung San Suu Kyi is not providing the necessary leadership, he says--despite her constraints she should be speaking out about the Rohingya and about free speech, for example. Nevertheless, she has been given too much flak, and this has become counterproductive.
    01/26/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Top Carnegie Council Resources, 2017
    2017 will be remembered for upheavals across the board and Carnegie Council's audience picks reflect this. Our most popular podcasts and web resources this year focused on shifts in the established geopolitical order; migrants and refugees; and the disruptions brought about by new technologies.
    12/13/17NewsPress Releases
  • Rescue: Refugees and the Political Crisis of Our Time, with David Miliband
    Today there are 65 million people who have fled their homes because of conflict or persecution, says the International Rescue Committee's David Miliband. These are refugees not economic migrants, and half of them are children. It's a long-term crisis that will last our lifetimes. Why should we care? And what can we do about it, both at a policy level and as individuals?
    12/04/17MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Rohingya Crisis: "Myanmar's Enemy Within" with Francis Wade
    Francis Wade, author of "The Enemy Within," a new book on the Rohingya crisis in Myanmar, explains the historical background to the persecution of the Muslim Rohingya minority and gives a first-hand account of the terrible situation now. Has democracy been good for Burma? Will some Rohingya refugees become Islamic extremists?
    11/16/17MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • After Liberal Hegemony: The Advent of a Multiplex World Order with Amitav Acharya
    The liberal order was never truly a global order, and we're not entering a multipolar era either, says Amitav Acharya. It's more accurate to call it a decentered, "multiplex" world, one where there are multiple consequential actors and complex global interdependence. Such a world is an unprecedented phenomenon and globalization will surely change. But it won't necessarily be a period of instability.
    10/02/17MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Ordinary Virtues: Moral Order in a Divided World
    To mark Carnegie Council's Centennial, Michael Ignatieff and team set out to discover what moral values people hold in common across nations. What he found was that while universal human rights may be the language of states and liberal elites, what resonate with most people are "ordinary virtues" practiced on a person-to-person basis, such as tolerance and forgiveness. He concludes that liberals most focus on strengthening these ordinary virtues.
    09/29/17MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Evolution of Corporate Ethics: A Strategic Case for Profit Maximization through Responsible Behavior
    "We are now transitioning from a world where philanthropic social contributions, i.e., Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), influenced behavior, to one where authentic Positive Impact drives behavior," write Ben Ersing and Robert Matus of Palladium International. Change is always difficult, both for individuals and corporations, but there are a handful of visionary leaders showing the way.
    09/27/17Publications Carnegie Ethics Online
  • The Driver in the Driverless Car with Vivek Wadhwa
    What are the social and ethical implications of new technologies such as widespread automation and gene editing? These innovations are no longer in the realm of science fiction, says entrepreneur and technology writer Vivek Wadhwa. They are coming closer and closer. We need to educate people about them and then come together and and have probing and honest discussions on what is good and what is bad.
    09/06/17MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Heidi Grant on U.S. Air Force Global Partnerships
    George Washington understood that building capable partners during peacetime can actually prevent war, says Heidi Grant. She is deputy under secretary of the Air Force, International Affairs, an organization which works with over a hundred countries to address shared security challenges. This includes selling them military equipment and increasing their capability to conduct their own ISR: intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance.
    08/30/17MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Conversation with Raymond Kuo: Can Trump be a Bismarck in Asia?
    "This has happened before where we've had a great power who is essentially the leader of the international system taking a transactional approach. The closest example would be maybe Bismarck in the 1870s until the eve of World War I. There it worked quite well. . . . The drawbacks of this, of course, are that it is highly unstable."
    07/11/17MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Earth Institute's Steven Cohen Offers Hope for a Sustainable Future
    "I still believe that we're heading toward a renewable resource-based economy. I think that it's inevitable," declares Steven Cohen. How will we get there? A combination of market forces as renewables become cheaper, better technology, and the sharing economy.
    07/10/17MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts

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