• China's Spies in California with Zach Dorfman
    "There is a significant counterintelligence threat on the West Coast of the U.S., and it differs in meaningful ways from what is commonly perceived of as counterintelligence work and targets on the East Coast," says Senior Fellow Zach Dorfman. He discusses shocking examples of Chinese espionage in particular, such as technology theft and spying on local politicians. The Chinese also exert pressure on diaspora communities to become more pro-PRC.
    09/11/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Americans & Putin's Russia, with Nikolas Gvosdev
    Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev looks at the reasons for the growing favorability ratings towards Putin's Russia among a certain segment of the American population. Is this a function of Trump's personal affection for the Russian president? Or, as has been seen in France and other European nations, are there deeper cultural and political connections?
    09/06/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Political Influence Operations, with Darren E. Tromblay
    "I see Russia as conducting more smash-and-grab type influence operations. China is in it for the longer term," says author and former U.S. government intelligence analyst Darren Tromblay. China is pursuing multiple campaigns, including efforts to infiltrate politics or pressure politicians on specific issues, leveraging business deals to support Beijing's objectives, and carrying out numerous academic and cultural initiatives.
    08/27/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • "Russian Roulette" & Influence, with Olga Oliker & Jeff Mankoff
    Jeffrey Mankoff and Olga Oliker of CSIS host a podcast called "Russian Roulette" on all things Russian (and Eurasian), from food and wine to politics. What is the Russian perspective on U.S.-Russia relations and what are the goals of Russia's covert influence operations in the U.S.? Do they all originate with Putin or are some of them bottom-up? Are the Russians happy with Trump's performance as president? Find out in this lively podcast.
    08/22/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Digital Deception & Dark Money, with Ann M. Ravel
    The term "fake news" is a little too tame, says Ann Ravel of the MapLight Digital Deception Project. Actually, this is foreign and domestic political propaganda aimed at undermining U.S. institutions and democracy. Maplight also tracks the enormous, pervasive problem of "dark money"--contributions by undisclosed donors to influence U.S. campaigns. Yet Ravel is optimistic that once Americans understand what's happening, it can be stopped.
    08/20/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Helsinki, Singapore, & the Emerging Trump Doctrine
    From the unprecedented Trump-Kim meeting, to what some call a treasonous press conference in Finland, to growing tensions between America and its closest allies, as well as its adversaries, this has been a historic summer for international affairs. RAND Corporation's Ali Wyne unpacks these developments and looks at a potentially busy September for North Korea and the continuing schism between Trump and his top foreign policy advisers.
    08/16/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Populist Appeal of American Decline
    "Is it possible that, in many circles, the decline of American hegemony is something voters are implicitly cheering?" asks Daniel Graeber of Grand Valley State University. If so, why? And how did America's descent contribute to the rise of an experienced, populist leader like Donald Trump? Constructivist theory--the notion in international relations theory that global affairs are influenced by social constructions--provides some answers.
    08/14/18Publications Carnegie Ethics Online
  • Ethics, Russia, and Syria
    How can Moscow can support a dictator who has used chemical weapons in his desperate attempts to retain power at all costs? And what does it say about American foreign policy when Washington won't mount the effort needed to remove him?
    08/13/18Publications Articles, Papers, and Reports
  • Carnegie Council Announces "Information Warfare" Podcast Interview Series
    With the growing power of surveillance technology and digital media, political influence operations have become an attractive tool of statecraft for great powers. These weapons of influence are being deployed in a battle for global public opinion about fate of the liberal order. The "Information Warfare" podcast series explores how these campaigns work, what their goals are, and how democracies can respond.
    08/08/18NewsPress Releases
  • China's "Opinion Deterrence" with Isaac Stone Fish
    "I think it's important to contrast what China is doing with what Russia is doing," says Asia Society's Isaac Stone Fish. "Russia influence operations and Russia influence is much more about sowing chaos, it's about destabilization, it's about making America weaker. China is much more about making China stronger. The United States is a vector and a way for China to become stronger." Elon Musk, Alibaba, and China's internal power structures are also discussed in this wide-ranging talk.
    07/18/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Russian Soft Power in France, with Marlene Laruelle & Jean-Yves Camus
    It's important to understand that Russia and France have had a centuries-long relationship which is mostly positive, say French scholars Marlene Laruelle and Jean-Yves Camus. Today there are layers of close economic and cultural ties, as well as common geopolitical interests, and the French extreme right and Russia share many of the same conservative values. Thus the remarkable strength of Russian influence in France is not surprising.
    06/20/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Living Legacy of WWI: Counterterrorism Strategies in the War's Aftermath, with Mary Barton
    "It is important to look at terrorism from a historical perspective, to understand where the term came from and to not see it as being tied to any one group for any specific cause," says Mary Barton, a contract historian with the Office of the Secretary of Defense Historical Office, "because left-wing groups have used terrorist tactics; right-wing groups have used terrorist tactics; different religious extremists have used terrorist tactics,"
    05/29/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Democracy Promotion in the Age of Trump
    In this panel Adrian Basora makes a strong case for democracy as not only promoting American values but also serving U.S. interests, while Maia Otarashvili gives a frightening overview of the rise of "illiberal values" (Viktor Orbán's phrase) in the Eurasia region. Basora and Otarashvili are co-editors of "Does Democracy Matter? The United States and Global Democracy Support" and Nikolas Gvosdev is one of the contributors.
    05/22/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The French Far Right in Russia's Orbit
    "Far-right groups in France are not restricted to the party of the Le Pen family. They are diverse, operate through networks, and are now well within Russia's force field. But this is not only the result of Vladimir Putin's charisma or Marine Le Pen's need for funds. The Russian question has drawn French nationalist activists into combat, both at the rhetorical level...and at the level of armed combat."
    05/15/18Publications Articles, Papers, and Reports
  • From Cold War to Hot Peace: An American Ambassador in Putin's Russia, with Michael McFaul
    As Obama's adviser on Russian affairs, Michael McFaul helped craft the United States' policy known as "reset" that fostered new and unprecedented collaboration between the two countries. Then, as U.S. ambassador to Russia from 2012-2014, he had a front-row seat when this fleeting moment crumbled with Vladimir Putin's return to the presidency. "It's tragic," he says. "How is it that we have come back to something close to the Cold War?"
    05/14/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Army of None: Autonomous Weapons and the Future of War, with Paul Scharre
    "What happens when a predator drone has as much as autonomy as a self-driving car, moving to something that is able to do all of the combat functions all by itself, that it can go out, find the enemy, and attack the enemy without asking for permission?" asks military and technology expert Paul Scharre. The technology's not there yet, but it will be very soon, raising a host of ethical, legal, military, and security challenges.
    05/08/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Peacemakers: Leadership Lessons from Twentieth-Century Statesmanship, with Bruce Jentleson
    What are the qualities and conditions that enable people to become successful peacemakers? At a time when peace seems elusive and conflict endemic, Bruce Jentleson makes a forceful and inspiring case for the continued relevance of statesmanship and diplomacy and provides practical guidance to 21st-century leaders seeking lessons from some of history's most accomplished negotiators, activists, and trailblazers.
    05/01/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • What do Americans (Republican Voters) Actually Think?
    We hear all sorts of assumptions as to what American voters—and now specifically Republican voters who may or may not serve as the basis for President Trump's support—think and believe about U.S. foreign policy. Do they have affection for Putin and Russia? Are they skeptical of free trade?
    04/23/18Publications Articles, Papers, and Reports
  • On Grand Strategy, with John Lewis Gaddis
    Are there such things as timeless principles of grand strategy? If so, are they always the same across epochs and cultures? What can we learn from reading the classics, such as Thucydides, Sun Tzu, and Clausewitz? "The fox knows many things, but the hedgehog knows one big thing," according to Isaiah Berlin. Which type makes better strategists, or do you need to be a bit of both? John Lewis Gaddis has some wise and thoughtful answers.
    04/13/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The United Nations, Human Rights, and American Disengagement
    A new "Foreign Policy" article says that as the United States has disengaged from the United Nations, Russia and China have moved to fill the vacuum. But they are not seeking to dismantle the liberal order--a theme discussed and debated in the current issue of "Ethics & International Affairs"--but reshape it more to their liking and preferences.
    03/28/18Publications Articles, Papers, and Reports

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