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  • The Crack-Up: Eugene Debs & the Origins of Socialism in the U.S., with Maurice Isserman
    Hamilton College's Maurice Isserman and historian Ted Widmer discuss American socialism in the early 1900s and the influence of Eugene Debs, a politician and trade unionist who received nearly a million votes for president in 1912. How did this movement influence Martin Luther King and the Civil Rights Movement? What's the difference between Debs and Democratic Socialists like Bernie Sanders and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez?
    07/08/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Ill Winds: Saving Democracy from Russian Rage, Chinese Ambition, and American Complacency, with Larry Diamond
    Larry Diamond's core argument is stark: the defense and advancement of democratic ideals relies on U.S. global leadership. If the U.S. does not reclaim its traditional place as the keystone of democracy, today's authoritarian trend could become a tsunami that could provide an opening for Vladimir Putin, Xi Jinping, and their admirers to turn the 21st century into a dark time of surging authoritarianism.
    06/20/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Crack-Up: A Hundred Years of Student Protests in China, with Jeffrey Wasserstrom
    In the latest "Crack-Up" podcast, China expert Jeffrey Wasserstrom discusses the rich history of Chinese student protests. From the May Fourth movement in 1919 to Tiananmen Square in 1989 to today's mass demonstrations in Hong Kong, what are the threads that tie these moments together? Don't miss this fascinating talk, which also touches on Woodrow Wilson, the Russian Revolution, and a young Mao Zedong.
    06/17/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Speech Police: The Global Struggle to Govern the Internet, with David Kaye
    The original idea of the Internet was for it be a "free speech nirvana," but in 2019, the reality is quite different. Authoritarians spread disinformation and extremists incite hatred, often on the huge, U.S.-based platforms, YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter. David Kaye, UN special rapporteur on freedom of opinion & expression, details the different approaches to these issues in Europe and the United States and looks for solutions in this informed and important talk.
    06/13/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: U.S.-Russian Relations, Ukraine, & the G-20, with Nikolas Gvosdev
    Following up on his talk with RAND analyst Ali Wyne on great-power competition, Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev gives an update on U.S.-Russian relations, touching on the war in Eastern Ukraine, the crisis in Venezuela, and election interference. He also previews the upcoming G-20 Summit in Japan, with Trump possibly hampered by his domestic controversies and talk of impeachment.
    06/11/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The American Public and U.S. Global Engagement: Mid-2019 Snapshot, with Ali Wyne
    Looking ahead to the 2020 election and the role that foreign policy will play on the campaign trail, Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev talks with RAND's Ali Wyne about the dominant international relations narrative in Trump-era Washington: "great-power competition." With Russia and China as the main competitors, how should we differentiate between the two nations? What is the U.S. actually competing for? And what would "victory" look like?
    06/10/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • How to Lose a Country: The 7 Steps from Democracy to Dictatorship, with Ece Temelkuran
    In her new book, award-winning Turkish novelist and political commentator Ece Temelkuran lays out the seven steps from democracy to dictatorship. "Some of these steps might be invisible to people even when they are living in it," she says, "so I wanted to make sure that people of the world, especially Western societies, can see what is happening to them so they won't lose time like we did in Turkey. I hope they won't end up losing their country as we did."
    06/03/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Emerging Narratives for U.S. Foreign Policy
    As we continue to move into the 21st century, the "post-Cold War" designation loses relevance. Yet a new construct and narrative has not emerged to take its place that enjoys broad support and resonance. Will tweaking the old narrative work? What alternatives will take its place?
    06/03/19Publications
  • Rebuilding the Narrative: Recreating the Rationale for U.S. Leadership, with Ash Jain
    There is skepticism about the core values of U.S. policy from both sides, says Ash Jain of the Atlantic Council, and the international order is under siege as never before. The Atlantic Council has launched an initiative aimed at revitalizing the rules-based democratic order and rebuilding bipartisan support among policymakers and the broader public. In this important discussion Jain explains the initiative's objectives and grapples with the audience's questions on how to move forward.
    05/24/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Millennials, Climate Change, & Foreign Policy, with Nikolas Gvosdev
    Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev discusses the generational divide in U.S. politics in the context of foreign policy and the environment. What are the international implications of initiatives like the Green New Deal? What would an "America First" environmental policy look like? And what happens if the U.S. continues to take a backseat on this issue?
    05/23/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: The Mueller Report & U.S. Foreign Policy, with Jonathan Cristol
    A lot of the talk about the Mueller Report has focused on its political and legal implications, but how will it affect U.S. foreign policy? Adelphi College's Jonathan Cristol discusses the reactions of allies and adversaries to Trump's passivity in the face of massive Russian interference in the U.S. election and congressional inaction and public apathy concerning presidential corruption. Plus, he details recent U.S. policy moves on Iran and the significance of NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg's speech to U.S. Congress.
    05/21/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • 100 Years After Versailles
    Just weeks after an armistice halted the most devastating conflict in generations, the victors of the Great War set out to negotiate the terms of the peace--and to rewrite the rules of international relations. A century later, we live in a world shaped by the Treaty of Versailles. In this fascinating discussion, a panel of distinguished historians delve into the complex situation on the ground at the time and the Treaty's legacy today, from Europe and the U.S. to Asia and the Middle East.
    05/14/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Josephine Marrocco Wins 2019 Carnegie Council Student Research Conference: Topic, AIDS Crisis in Russia
    The winning presentation in this year's Student Research Conference was by Josephine Marrocco of Fordham University in New York. Her presentation "Sex, Drugs and Propaganda: Why AIDS persists in the Russian Federation" examines the use of government propaganda in the context of Russia's AIDS crisis.
    05/10/19NewsPress Releases
  • Sex, Drugs, and Propaganda: Why AIDS Persists in the Russian Federation
    On May 3, 2019, Josephine Marrocco's presentation on HIV/AIDS in Russia was selected as the winner of the Council's fifth annual Student Research Conference. Afterwards, Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Devin Stewart, who organized the conference, conducted this email interview with her about her research.
    05/10/19Publications
  • Back to Spheres of Influence?
    National Security Adviser John Bolton's recent comments on Russia's interest in Venezuela bring back a concept prevalent in much earlier version of international affairs: spheres of influence. Was this a slip of the tongue or it could it set a precedent for other realms of U.S. foreign policy?
    05/03/19Publications
  • The Crack-Up: Winston Churchill & the Geopolitics of 1919, with Andrew Roberts
    In this episode of the Crack-Up series on 1919, Andrew Roberts, author of "Churchill: Walking with Destiny," examines how Churchill dealt with the complicated problems facing Great Britain at the end of World War I, including how to treat the Germans in defeat, his changing views on Russia--but always in pursuit of British national interests--his stance on a homeland for the Jews, and his determination to hold on to British India.
    04/08/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Romania: NATO's Frail Anchor in a Turbulent Black Sea
    "This week, together with six other former communist bloc countries, Romania marks the 15th anniversary of its NATO accession," writes Theo Stan. "If it succeeds to get its act together the country's pro-U.S. posture and diplomacy may never have weighed more in anchoring Euro-Atlantic stability."
    04/05/19Publications
  • The Crack-Up: Egypt & the Wilsonian Moment, with Erez Manela
    For about 18 months after World War I there was what historian Erez Manela calls the "Wilsonian moment"--a brief period when President Woodrow Wilson led people around the world to believe that he would champion a new world order of self-determination and rights for small nations. How did this actually play out, particularly in the case of Egypt, which was a British Protectorate at the time?
    03/26/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Computational Propaganda, with Nick Monaco
    In this in-depth conversation, Oxford Internet Institute researcher Nick Monaco reviews the history of computational propaganda (online disinformation), which goes back almost two decades and includes countries ranging from Mexico to South Korea. His topics include Russia's IRA (Internet Research Agency), the role of China's Huawei, and a recent case study on Taiwan, where "digital democracy meets automated autocracy."
    03/20/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The New Rules of War: Victory in the Age of Durable Disorder, with Sean McFate
    "Nobody fights conventionally except for us anymore, yet we're sinking a big bulk, perhaps the majority of our defense dollars, into preparing for another conventional war, which is the very definition of insanity," declares national security strategist and former paratrooper Sean McFate. The U.S. needs to recognize that we're living in an age of "durable disorder"--a time of persistent, smoldering conflicts--and the old rules no longer apply.
    03/19/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts

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