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  • The Crack-Up: 1919 & the Birth of Modern Korea, with Kyung Moon Hwang
    Could the shared historical memory of March 1 ever be a source of unity between North Koreans and South Koreans? In this fascinating episode of The Crack-Up series that explores how 1919 shaped the modern world, Professor Kyung Moon Hwang discusses the complex birth of Korean nationhood and explains how both North and South Korea owe their origins and their national history narratives to the events swirling around March 1, 1919.
    03/14/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Sicilian Expedition and the Dilemma of Interventionism
    The Peloponnesian War has lessons for U.S. foreign policy beyond the Thucydides Trap. Johanna Hanink reminds us that the debate over moral exceptionalism and interventionism is nothing new.
    03/14/19Publications
  • Democracy: Freedom with a Caveat
    "As a kid living in Silicon Valley whose whole life has been in the shadow of historic advancement, I hope these will not be the times that I look back on and realize our democracy was being crippled. I hope everyone will understand that it is not sufficient to live in a democracy, but instead to maintain one."
    03/12/19Publications
  • Democracy is What We Choose and Uphold
    "Looking at both the United States and Colombia, with their different foundations and distinct problems, it seems that these political issues seem to take off regardless of the presence of democracy. Democracy doesn't immediately mean that there will be any safeguards against the problems our societies face."
    03/12/19Publications
  • The "Dirty War" and the History of Democracy in Argentina
    "Traveling from the United States for the first time at age 17, I thought I knew the definition of democracy: a system in which the representatives are chosen by the people and for the people—simple enough. In Argentina, I quickly learned that democracy was something much more fragile, emotional, and austere than I ever realized."
    03/12/19Publications
  • Global Ethics Weekly: The National Emergencies Act & Trump, with Andrew Boyle
    As the debates about the Southern border continue, the Brennan Center's Andrew Boyle details the 1976 law behind Trump's February 15 emergency declaration. As he tells it, the National Emergencies Act was put in place, in the wake of Watergate, to constrain presidential power. What are the current and coming legal challenges to Trump's declaration? And how can this law be reformed to avoid future stalemates?
    03/12/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Climate Change and Competing Ethical Visions
    The prevailing narrative in the fight against climate change is that we must adopt more cooperative efforts to help vulnerable populations. But what if, instead of this collective approach, countering climate change turns into a zero-sum game for nation-states?
    03/07/19Publications
  • Global Ethics Weekly: AI Governance & Ethics, with Wendell Wallach
    Wendell Wallach, consultant, ethicist, and scholar at the Yale Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics, discusses some of the current issues in artificial intelligence (AI), including his push for international governance of the technology. He and host Alex Woodson also speak about Trump's recent executive order, universal basic income, and some of the ethical issues in China concerning AI, including the Social Credit System.
    03/07/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Challenges to American Democracy, with Michael Waldman
    "We're all really proud of our system. It's the world's oldest democracy, and we've always had to fight to make it real," says Michael Waldman of NYU Law School. "But in the last 10-20 years and especially recently we've seen challenges to the right to vote and challenges to the role of big money in politics. That means we have to fight for democracy all over again." What can young people do to help get our democracy back?
    03/05/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • A U.S.-China Tech Cold War? with Adam Segal
    Are we headed for a U.S.-China tech Cold War and what should we do about it? "There's no way we're ever going to beat China on scale," says Adam Segal, author of "The Hacked World Order." "They're just always going to spend more than we are, so that means you have to cooperate with the Europeans and others on scientific discovery and invention." Segal discusses who is currently winning the information war, Huawei, China's future, and more.
    03/04/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Implications of the INF Withdrawal, with Jonathan Cristol
    Adelphi University's Jonathan Cristol discusses the Trump administration's decision to step away from the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty (INF) and its possible effects on international arms control. Why is this a positive development for Putin and Russia? Are other treaties and alliances in danger?
    02/28/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Enduring False Promise of Preventive War, with Scott A. Silverstone
    Does preventive war really work? "In the vast majority of cases historically, what we see is the country that thought it was saving itself from a greater danger in the future actually creates this greater danger because you generate a level of hostility, a deepening rivalry, and a desire for revenge that comes back to haunt them," says Scott Silverstone. His advice: Hesitate. Before taking action, think through this "preventive war paradox."
    02/26/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • How to Think about War: An Ancient Guide to Foreign Policy, with Johanna Hanink
    Why has there been a sudden interest in Thucydides, especially in the U.S.? Johanna Hanink discusses her new book of translations and introductions to key speeches from his "History of the Peloponnesian War," and the importance of the classics in general. "The book is of special interest to us here at Carnegie for its focus on ethics, democracy, and world affairs, all of which seem to be under stress these days," says Joel Rosenthal.
    02/25/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Crack-Up: Jazz Arrives, Loudly, in 1919, with David Sager
    In this fascinating podcast, Ted Widmer talks to jazz historian David Sager about his "New York Times" essay on the genre's breakthrough in 1919, its popularity in France during World War I, and the tragic story of legendary African American bandleader James Reese Europe.
    02/22/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: The U.S.-Taliban Negotiations, with Jonathan Cristol
    Jonathan Cristol, author of "The United States and Taliban before and after 9/11," discusses the status of the latest talks between the U.S. government and the Taliban, in an effort to end the decades-long war in Afghanistan. Are women's rights being addressed? Are neighboring countries' interests being taken into account? And can we trust the Trump administration in this tense geopolitical environment?
    02/21/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Jerome A. Cohen on the Taiwan Relations Act
    U.S.-Taiwan relations have long been an ingenious balancing act of "strategic ambiguity." What does the 1979 Taiwan Relations Act entail and why is it important, not only to Taiwan, but to U.S.-China relations and indeed security across Asia? Legendary China expert Jerome Cohen unpacks the history of Taiwan since 1895, its current situation and legal status, and what this could mean for Asia and the United States.
    02/20/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • China's Power and Messaging, with Bonnie S. Glaser
    "There are areas where China lags behind other countries in its power, areas where it's catching up, and areas where China really has leapfrogged some other countries, including the United States, and is pulling ahead," says Bonnie Glaser of CSIS. Certainly, China is investing heavily in promoting a favorable narrative about China around the world, a strategy increasingly being referred to as "political influence operations."
    02/19/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Competing Bipartisan Consensuses?
    Is there any bipartisan political consensus on U.S. foreign policy? Nikolas Gvosdev argues that voters want to see the United States involved in world affairs if it makes Americans safer, more secure, and prosperous.
    02/19/19Publications
  • The Future is Asian, with Parag Khanna
    "The rise of China is not the biggest story in the world," says Parag Khanna. "The Asianization of Asia, the return of Asia, the rise of the Asian system, is the biggest story in the world." This new Asian system, where business, technology, globalization, and geopolitics are intertwined, stretches from Japan to Saudi Arabia, from Australia to Russia, and Indonesia to Turkey, linking 5 billion people.
    02/12/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Carnegie Council Presents "The Crack-Up," a Podcast Series about the Pivotal Year of 1919
    Created and hosted by historian and Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Ted Widmer, "The Crack-Up" is a special podcast series about the events of 1919, a turbulent year that in many ways shaped the 20th century and the modern world. Widmer is working with The "New York Times" on a series of long features on the legacy of 1919 and these podcasts are designed to complement the articles by interviewing each of the authors.
    02/12/19NewsPress Releases

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