• Competing Ethics in the Biden Administration?
    In this blog post responding to Thomas Wright's recent article in "The Atlantic," Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev outlines the three different "camps" vying for influence over the foreign policy and national security policies of the Biden-Harris administration. What common ground can be found between "restorationists," "reformers," and "progressives?"
    11/23/20Publications
  • Biden, Sanders, & Foreign Policy after Super Tuesday, with Nikolas Gvosdev
    Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev looks at the foreign policy discussions after Super Tuesday, with only Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders left with realistic chances at the Democratic nomination. When it comes to the U.S. role in the world, what are the big differences between these two candidates? Is Biden's "restorationist" agenda risky? And looking ahead to a post-Trump future, how have relationships changed between the U.S. and its allies?
    03/04/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Carnegie New Leaders Podcast: Cybersecurity, Norms, & Regulations, with Jason Healey
    Are there norms when it comes to cybersecurity? How should governments regulate this emerging domain? What's the role of the private sector? SIPA's Jason Healey discusses all this and more with cybersecurity analyst Alicia Fawcett. Plus, he explains some of the risks associated with cyberattacks and why, so far, they haven't escalated into anything "kinetic."
    02/27/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Killer Robots, Ethics, & Governance, with Peter Asaro

    Peter Asaro, co-founder of the International Committee for Robot Arms Control, has a simple solution for stopping the future proliferation of killer robots, or lethal autonomous weapons: "Ban them." What are the ethical and logistical risks of this technology? How would it change the nature of warfare? And with the U.S. and other nations currently developing killer robots, what is the state of governance?


    02/11/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Gallagher's Proposal & Emerging Narratives
    Rep. Michael Gallagher (R-WI) recently penned a "Wall Street Journal" op-ed laying out a new paradigm for U.S. foreign policy, as it relates to trade and "great power competition" against China, with a call for the U.S., the UK, and other like-minded nations to forge a new trade and technological alliance. Nikolas Gvosdev analyzes this idea in the context of changing U.S. foreign policy narratives.
    02/11/20Publications
  • Democratic Candidates & Foreign Policy after Iowa, with Nikolas Gvosdev
    With the (incomplete) results of the Iowa Caucus putting the spotlight on Pete Buttigieg and Bernie Sanders, what do we know about their foreign policy platforms? How do they differentiate themselves from Joe Biden? Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev shares his thoughts and touches on voters' possible perception of Sanders as a "socialist" and how climate change could become an issue in this election.
    02/05/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Do Morals Matter? Presidents & Foreign Policy from FDR to Trump, with Joseph Nye
    How much do morals matter for U.S. presidents when it comes to international affairs? What are the ethics of "America First" or 2003 invasion of Iraq? Joseph Nye, former dean of the Harvard Kennedy School, works through each presidency from FDR to Trump and scores their foreign policy on three ethical dimensions of their intentions, the means they used, and the consequences of their decisions.
    02/04/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Crack-Up: The Birth of the Modern Middle East, with Ted Widmer
    At the end of World War I, colonial powers carved up the Ottoman Empire and the reverberations are still being felt today. Historian Ted Widmer discusses the circumstances that led to this fateful episode and why Woodrow Wilson wasn't able to extend his principle of "self-determination" to the Middle East. How should we think about the Trump-Netanyahu peace plan in the context of what happened in Palestine in 1919?
    01/31/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • In Favor of the Public Interest: Social Media Should be Regulated
    "The sheer size of the social media market in news delivery, as well as the numerous instances of social media being used for harmful ends, are powerful reasons why the freedom of social media must be limited with carefully crafted, democratically discussed regulations."
    01/31/20Publications
  • Compromising on Censorship? The Case for a Bilateral Agreement Over the Internet
    "To prevent this status quo where the sovereignty of some states is infringed by the power of foreign platforms, a deal should be struck between global Internet powers, most importantly between China and the U.S. Just like nuclear deals had to (and still have to) involve Russia and the U.S., a trans-Pacific compromise is needed in a world where the Internet leadership is shared between China and the U.S."
    01/31/20Publications
  • Carnegie New Leaders Interview: Moving Foreign Policy Forward, with Elmira Bayrasli
    In discussion with Brian Mateo, a member of the Carnegie New Leaders program, Elmira Bayrasli discusses her work as CEO of Foreign Policy Interrupted, an organization dedicated to amplifying women's voices in interntionl affairs. Plus, she speaks about the future of foreign policy, including the effect of social media and other technological developments.
    01/28/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Just War, Unjust Soldiers, & American Public Opinion, with Scott D. Sagan
    Do soldiers fighting for a "just cause" have more rights than soldiers fighting on the other side? In this interview following up on an "Ethics & International Affairs" article, Stanford's Professor Scott D. Sagan discusses the results of a study he conducted with Dartmouth's Professor Benjamin A. Valentino on how Americans think about this profound question.
    01/27/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Foreign Policy Narratives in Palm Beach
    After an invitation to speak at a gathering of the Palm Beach chapter of the United Nations Association of the United States, U.S. Global Engagement Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev reflects on the current scope and direction of U.S. foreign policy. How will new uncertainties in the international system influence the relationships among the democratic community of nations?
    01/23/20Publications
  • Privacy, Surveillance, & the Terrorist Trap, with Tom Parker
    How can investigators utilize new technology like facial recognition software while respecting the rights of suspects and the general public? What are the consequences of government overreaction to terrorist threats? Tom Parker, author of "Avoiding the Terrorist Trap," discusses privacy, surveillance, and more in the context of counterterrorism.
    01/14/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Gene Editing Governance & Dr. He Jiankui, with Jeffrey Kahn
    Jeffrey Kahn, director of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute for Bioethics, discusses the many governance issues connected to gene editing. Plus, he gives a first-hand account of an historic conference in Hong Kong last year in which Dr. He Jiankui shared his research on the birth of the world's first germline genetically engineered babies. What's the future of the governance of this emerging technology?
    12/02/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Trump is the Symptom, Not the Problem
    Astute observers of U.S. foreign policy have been making the case, as we move into the 2020 elections, not to see the interruptions in the flow of U.S. foreign policy solely as a result of the personality and foibles of the current occupant of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, writes Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev. Ian Bremmer and Colin Dueck expand on this thought.
    11/22/19Publications
  • Gene Editing: Overview, Ethics, & the Near Future, with Robert Klitzman
    In the first in a series of podcasts on gene editing, Columbia's Dr. Robert Klitzman provides an overview of the technology, ethical and governance issues, and where it could all go in the near future. Plus he explains why the birth of genetically engineered twins in China last year was a "seismic" event. How could gene editing lead to more inequality? What could be some of unintended consequences?
    11/20/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Crack-Up: Dwight Eisenhower & the Road Trip that Changed America, with Brian C. Black
    In 1919, a young Army officer named Dwight Eisenhower, along with a "Mad Max"-style military convoy, set out on a cross-country road trip to examine the nascent state of America's roads. Penn State Altoona's Professor Brian C. Black explains how this trip influenced Eisenhower's decisions decades later, both as general and president, and laid the groundwork for the rise of petroleum-based engines and the interstate highway system.
    11/18/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • AI in the Arctic: Future Opportunities & Ethical Concerns, with Fritz Allhoff
    How can artificial intelligence improve food security, medicine, and infrastructure in Arctic communities? What are some logistical, ethical, and governance challenges? Western Michigan's Professor Fritz Allhoff details the future of technology in this extreme environment, which is being made more accessible because of climate change. Plus he shares his thoughts on some open philosophical questions surrounding AI.
    11/13/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Fighting ISIS Online, with Asha Castleberry-Hernandez
    National security expert Asha Castleberry-Hernandez discusses what "ISIS 2.0" means and how the terrorist group has used social media to recruit and spread its message. How has its strategy changed since the death of its leader Abur Bakr al-Baghdadi? What can the U.S. military, Congress, and executive branch do better to fight the group online?
    11/08/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts

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