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  • What the Tunisian Revolution Taught Me about Democracy
    "The rights and protections that democracy endows can be dangerous if a country is not prepared for it. If a country lacks alternative political leaders to take the helm after a democratic transition, it will be led incompetently. If it does not have a political elite that is well-versed in the workings of competitive party politics and democratic policymaking, there would be no respect for the democratic process. If its people are not active participants in governance, democracy will be sabotaged by populists and opportunists."
    03/12/19Publications
  • The Enduring False Promise of Preventive War, with Scott A. Silverstone
    Does preventive war really work? "In the vast majority of cases historically, what we see is the country that thought it was saving itself from a greater danger in the future actually creates this greater danger because you generate a level of hostility, a deepening rivalry, and a desire for revenge that comes back to haunt them," says Scott Silverstone. His advice: Hesitate. Before taking action, think through this "preventive war paradox."
    02/26/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Future is Asian, with Parag Khanna
    "The rise of China is not the biggest story in the world," says Parag Khanna. "The Asianization of Asia, the return of Asia, the rise of the Asian system, is the biggest story in the world." This new Asian system, where business, technology, globalization, and geopolitics are intertwined, stretches from Japan to Saudi Arabia, from Australia to Russia, and Indonesia to Turkey, linking 5 billion people.
    02/12/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: The Situation in Western Sahara, with Ambassador Sidi Omar
    Ambassador Sidi Omar, UN representative for Frente POLISARIO, a liberation movement aiming to secure the independence of Western Sahara, discusses the decades-long dispute in Northwest Africa. With negotiations ongoing between Frente POLISARIO and Morocco at the UN, could there be a resolution? How do Europe and the Trump administration fit in?
    02/07/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • A Chance for Peace in Western Sahara
    "For over a century, the people of Western Sahara have been denied our fundamental right to decide our future," writes Sidi Omar, UN representative for Frente POLISARIO, a liberation movement aiming to secure the independence of Western Sahara. Recent months have seen a flurry of diplomatic activity, prompted by the Trump administration and the appointment of a new personal envoy for the UN secretary-general. Will there be peace at last?
    02/05/19Publications
  • 1919 & the Crack Up, with Ted Widmer
    Created and hosted by Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Ted Widmer, "The Crack-Up" is a special podcast series about the events of 1919, a year that in many ways shaped the 20th century and the modern world. And throughout 2019, "The New York Times" will be running long features on the legacy of 1919. These videos explain why 1919 was such an important year, what "the crack-up" means, and previews upcoming essays and podcasts.
    01/17/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Perfect Weapon: War, Sabotage, and Fear in the Cyber Age, with David Sanger
    From the U.S. operation against Iran's nuclear enrichment plant, to Chinese theft of personal data, North Korea's financially motivated attacks on American companies, or Russia's interference in the 2016 election, cyberweapons have become the weapon of choice for democracies, dictators, and terrorists. "New York Times" national security correspondent David Sanger explains how and why cyberattacks are now the number one security threat.
    01/14/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: U.S. Defense Policy After Mattis, with Asha Castleberry
    National security expert and U.S. Army veteran Asha Castleberry makes sense of a busy and seemingly chaotic time for the Department of Defense in the wake of Secretary Mattis' departure. What should think about Trump's plans in Syria and Afghanistan? How is the U.S. planning to counter China in Africa? And has John Bolton actually been a moderating influence?
    01/09/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Ethics and the Syria Withdrawal
    Referencing an "Atlantic" article by Conor Fridersdorf, Nikolas Gvosdev goes over some important and overlooked ethical questions surrounding Trump's decision to withraw U.S. troops from Syria.
    01/03/19Publications
  • Jailing of Journalists Worldwide, with CPJ's Elana Beiser
    Elana Beiser of the Committee to Protect Journalists discusses the latest CPJ report, which finds that for the third year in a row, 251 or more journalists are jailed around the world, suggesting the authoritarian approach to critical news coverage is more than a temporary spike. Also for the third year running, Turkey, China, and Egypt were responsible for about half of those imprisoned, with Turkey remaining the world's worst jailer.
    12/19/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Women's Employment & Working in a War Zone, with Mariel Davis
    Education for Employment's Mariel Davis discusses some of the many issues surrounding women's employment in the Middle East and North Africa, focusing on the story of a young Palestinian working in the hospitality industry. Plus, she details the struggles of working--and trying to work--in war-torn Yemen.
    11/29/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Ethics in Action for Global Ethics Day 2018: 140+ Activities in 50+ Countries
    Founded by Carnegie Council in 2014 and held every October, Global Ethics Day provides an opportunity for everyone around the world to explore the crucial role of ethics in their professions and their daily lives. October 17, 2018 marked the fifth annual Global Ethics Day; it was the biggest year yet. Thanks to all who took part.
    10/29/18NewsPress Releases
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Youth Unemployment & Refugees in the Middle East & North Africa, with Mariel Davis
    The Middle East and North Africa has a huge youth and young adult population--65 percent of the people in the region are under 30--but unfortunately unemployment among this group remains high. Education for Employment's Mariel Davis details how the organization is working to change this. She also discusses the challenges facing refugees, with a focus on Jordan.
    10/25/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Unlocking the Potential of Young Working Women in the Middle East and North Africa
    Through the story of Fatima AlRiami, a doctor in Yemen, Mariel Davis of Education for Employment not only illustrates some of the challenges that young women face in entering the workforce in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), but also highlights the potential of those who do make it into the labor market.
    10/17/18Publications
  • The Future of U.S. National Security, with Derek Reveron
    "Is it still fair to say there are continuities in foreign policy two years into the Trump administration? I'm going to say yes, and I'll offer some evidence," declares Derek S. Reveron of the U.S. Naval War College and Harvard Kennedy School. Don't miss this expert analysis of America's role in the world.
    10/10/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • All Options Are on the Table: Threats and Coercive Diplomacy in Foreign Affairs
    Are there ever justifiable reasons for issuing threats to achieve foreign policy objectives? In particular, are President Trump's threats against Iran justified? Don't miss this rare opportunity to get the Iranian perspective with this stimulating discussion between Drs. Reichberg and Syse of the Peace Research Insitute Oslo (PRIO) and H.E. Gholamali Khoshroo, permanent representative of Iran to the United Nations.
    10/02/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Refugees, from Utica to Uganda, with Kavitha Rajagopalan
    As the Trump administration cuts refugee resettlement in the U.S. to its lowest number in decades, this population in other nations has exploded in recent years. Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Kavitha Rajagopalan details what this looks like for one refugee in Utica, New York and the challenges that countries like Uganda and Turkey are facing.
    09/27/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Making Foreign Policy Relevant Again, with Asha Castleberry & Ali Wyne
    Has a gap opened up between the U.S. national security community and the general public over foreign policy? If so, why? How can we close it? Moderated by Nikolas Gvosdev, this panel with foreign policy experts Asha Castleberry and Ali Wyne is part of a larger effort by Carnegie Council's U.S. Global Engagement Program to examine drivers in U.S. politics pushing the United States to disengage from international affairs.
    09/25/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Ethics, Russia, and Syria
    How can Moscow can support a dictator who has used chemical weapons in his desperate attempts to retain power at all costs? And what does it say about American foreign policy when Washington won't mount the effort needed to remove him?
    08/13/18Publications
  • Global Ethics Weekly: The Ongoing Crisis in Yemen
    The world's worst humanitarian crisis is ongoing in Yemen, as the Saudi-led coalition, with the support of the U.S., continues its brutal campaign against the entrenched Houthi rebels. Waleed Alhariri, U.S. director of the Sana'a Center for Strategic Studies, details the military stalemate centered on a Red Sea port, the debate about America's role, and the prospects for peace, with a UN-led conference in Geneva scheduled for early September.
    08/09/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts

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