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  • Ethics in Business: In Their Own Words, with Pendal's Emilio Gonzalez
    Emilio Gonzalez, group CEO at Pendal in Australia, speaks about the role of ethics in global investment management. He discusses his organization's charitable work, its innovative "contribution leave" policy, how to engage with new technology, like AI, in a thoughtful way, and much more.
    07/10/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Ill Winds: Saving Democracy from Russian Rage, Chinese Ambition, and American Complacency, with Larry Diamond
    Larry Diamond's core argument is stark: the defense and advancement of democratic ideals relies on U.S. global leadership. If the U.S. does not reclaim its traditional place as the keystone of democracy, today's authoritarian trend could become a tsunami that could provide an opening for Vladimir Putin, Xi Jinping, and their admirers to turn the 21st century into a dark time of surging authoritarianism.
    06/20/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Speech Police: The Global Struggle to Govern the Internet, with David Kaye
    The original idea of the Internet was for it be a "free speech nirvana," but in 2019, the reality is quite different. Authoritarians spread disinformation and extremists incite hatred, often on the huge, U.S.-based platforms, YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter. David Kaye, UN special rapporteur on freedom of opinion & expression, details the different approaches to these issues in Europe and the United States and looks for solutions in this informed and important talk.
    06/13/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Anti-Narrative
    Among the electorate, especially since the 2016 election, there is a counter-narrative at play regarding the role of the U.S. in international affairs. This "anti-narrative" has two main planks. The first is an across-the-board distrust of the media. The second is the "death of expertise."
    06/12/19Publications
  • Just Out: "Ethics & International Affairs" Summer 2019 Issue
    This issue features a roundtable on artificial intelligence and the future of global affairs. It also contains essays about the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption; the ethics of the "pluriverse;" diversity and hierarchy in international politics; and much more.
    06/11/19NewsPress Releases
  • C2G2 Changes Name to Carnegie Climate Governance Initiative (C2G)
    The Carnegie Climate Geoengineering Governance Initiative (C2G2) has a new name: from now on, it will be known as the Carnegie Climate Governance Initiative (C2G).
    06/10/19NewsPress Releases
  • Ethics & International Affairs Volume 33.2 (Summer 2019)
    This issue features a roundtable on artificial intelligence and the future of global affairs. It also contains essays about the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption; the ethics of the "pluriverse;" diversity and hierarchy in international politics; and much more.
    06/07/19Publications
  • China, Surveillance, and "Belt & Road" with Joshua Eisenman
    Just back from China, Sinologist (and fluent Mandarin speaker) Joshua Eisenman discusses the pervasive camera surveillance and facial recognition systems there; the omnipresent power of "the security state;" the effect of the U.S.-China trade war on everyday life and future business; and the expansion of the original Belt and Road project, a term than is now applied to almost any project anywhere in the world.
    06/05/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • How to Lose a Country: The 7 Steps from Democracy to Dictatorship, with Ece Temelkuran
    In her new book, award-winning Turkish novelist and political commentator Ece Temelkuran lays out the seven steps from democracy to dictatorship. "Some of these steps might be invisible to people even when they are living in it," she says, "so I wanted to make sure that people of the world, especially Western societies, can see what is happening to them so they won't lose time like we did in Turkey. I hope they won't end up losing their country as we did."
    06/03/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Emerging Narratives for U.S. Foreign Policy
    As we continue to move into the 21st century, the "post-Cold War" designation loses relevance. Yet a new construct and narrative has not emerged to take its place that enjoys broad support and resonance. Will tweaking the old narrative work? What alternatives will take its place?
    06/03/19Publications
  • Rebuilding the Narrative: Recreating the Rationale for U.S. Leadership, with Ash Jain
    There is skepticism about the core values of U.S. policy from both sides, says Ash Jain of the Atlantic Council, and the international order is under siege as never before. The Atlantic Council has launched an initiative aimed at revitalizing the rules-based democratic order and rebuilding bipartisan support among policymakers and the broader public. In this important discussion Jain explains the initiative's objectives and grapples with the audience's questions on how to move forward.
    05/24/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • A Thousand Small Sanities: The Moral Adventure of Liberalism, with Adam Gopnik
    In his eloquent defense of liberalism, Adam Gopnik goes back to its origins and argues that rather than emphasizing the role of the individual, the principles of community and compromise are at the core of the liberal project. Indeed, these are the essential elements of humane, pluralist societies; and in an age of autocracy, our very lives may depend on their continued existence.
    05/22/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Wichita and American Global Engagement
    Senior Fellw Nikolas Gvosdev discusses his takeaways from a visit to the Wichita Committee on Foreign Relations and from a talk from foreign policy analyst Aly Wyne. He writes the U.S. foreign policy establishment needs to work on engendering trust and articulate clearer goals.
    05/21/19Publications
  • Carnegie Council Appoints Ambassador Jean-Marie Guéhenno as Senior Fellow
    Carnegie Council is pleased to announce the appointment of Ambassador Jean-Marie Guéhenno as Senior Fellow. During his two-year fellowship, he will be working on a book tentatively titled "The Second Renaissance: In Search of a New Balance Between the Individual and the Collective." The author of three previous books, Guéhenno is an expert in peacekeeping, transnational security threats, and global governance.
    05/20/19NewsPress Releases
  • 100 Years After Versailles
    Just weeks after an armistice halted the most devastating conflict in generations, the victors of the Great War set out to negotiate the terms of the peace--and to rewrite the rules of international relations. A century later, we live in a world shaped by the Treaty of Versailles. In this fascinating discussion, a panel of distinguished historians delve into the complex situation on the ground at the time and the Treaty's legacy today, from Europe and the U.S. to Asia and the Middle East.
    05/14/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • What Americans Want
    The Center for American Progress has released their exhaustive survey of what Americans want in foreign policy and their results track closely with the conclusions reached by the U.S. Global Engagement study group. What remains to be seen, however, is whether the broad parameters of what Americans want in foreign policy will be taken up by any of the 2020 presidential candidates.
    05/08/19Publications
  • The Generational Divide?
    As Millennials and "Generation Z" begin to enter the ranks of both American politics as well as the expert community, it is uncertain if they will share the same assumptions about the role of the United States in international affairs, writes Nikolas Gvosdev.
    05/07/19Publications
  • How Change Happens, with Cass Sunstein
    From the French Revolution to the Arab Spring to #MeToo, how does social change happen? In a book that was 25 years in the making, Cass Sunstein unpacks this puzzle by exploring the interplay of three decisive factors. Don't miss this insightful talk. It may change how you view the world.
    04/23/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Human Rights, Liberalism, & Ordinary Virtues, with Michael Ignatieff
    Central European University's President Michael Ignatieff is a human rights scholar, an educator, a former politician, and, as he tells us, the son of a refugee. He discusses what he calls "the ordinary virtues," such as patience and tolerance; the status of human rights today and the dilemmas of migration; the essential critera for true democracy; and the ideal curriculum. His advice to students: Learn to think for yourself.
    04/22/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Ethics and Climate Change: Earth Day 2019
    In honor of Earth Day, April 22, 2019, Carnegie Council presents a selection of materials from the past year on the ethical responsibilities and challenges of coping with climate change.
    04/21/19PublicationsResource Picks

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