• Identity: The Demand for Dignity and the Politics of Resentment, with Francis Fukuyama
    The rise of global populism is the greatest threat to global democracy, and it's mainly driven not by economics, but by people's demand for public recognition of their identities, says political scientist Francis Fukuyama. "We want other people to affirm our worth, and that has to be a political act." How is this playing out in the U.S., Europe, and Asia? What practical steps can we take to counteract it?
    09/17/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • ACCA, Carnegie Council, and CFA Institute Join Forces to Shine a Light on Ethics
    ACCA (the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants) has teamed up with Carnegie Council and CFA Institute to celebrate this year's Global Ethics Day on October 17, 2018. Beginning with a series of "follow the sun" events on Global Ethics Day itself, the three organizations are also producing a film interview series called "Ethics in business: in their own words" which will feature a number of global CEOs.
    09/17/18NewsPress Releases
  • Future Politics, with Jamie Susskind
    There are three major technological developments that are transforming the way we live, says Jamie Susskind: increasingly capable systems, increasingly integrated technology, and increasingly quantified society. With these we are moving into the "digital lifeworld," which is basically a different stage of human existence. What will these momentous changes mean for the future of politics and society--i.e. how we order our collective lives?
    09/14/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Expertise in the Era of Trump, with Joel Rosenthal
    Responding to excerpts from U.S. Naval War College's Professor Tom Nichols and best-selling author and economist Dambisa Moyo--and the hostile anti-expert tone of the Trump era--Carnegie Council President Joel Rosenthal discusses how he approaches his area of expertise, international relations. How did we end up here? And is there reason for optimism when looking at younger generations?
    09/13/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Advising the Next Administration: Finding a New Foreign Policy Approach
    The Center for American Progress has released a report laying out a foreign policy approach that the next administration might consider adopting. What are some "bold new policies" that could improve U.S. engagement with the world?
    09/12/18Publications Articles, Papers, and Reports
  • Ethics & International Affairs Volume 32.3 (Fall 2018)
    The centerpiece of this issue is a roundtable guest-edited by James Pattison on the ethics of overlooked alternatives to war, with contributions from Alex J. Bellamy, Corneliu Bjola, Cécile Fabre, Michael L. Gross, and James Pattison. Additionally, the issue contains an essay by Ian Hurd on the empire of international legalism; a feature by Alejandra Mancilla evaluating the moral force of territorial claims in Antarctica; a review essay by George DeMartino on sensible globalization in an illiberal era; and book reviews by Eleanor Gordon, Marcus Carlsen Häggrot, Shadi Mokhtari, and Serena Parekh.
    09/05/18Publications Ethics & International Affairs
  • Just Out: "Ethics & International Affairs" Fall 2018 Issue
    The centerpiece of this issue is a roundtable guest-edited by James Pattison on the ethics of overlooked alternatives to war, with contributions from Alex J. Bellamy, Corneliu Bjola, Cécile Fabre, Michael L. Gross, and James Pattison. Additionally, the issue contains an essay by Ian Hurd on the empire of international legalism; a feature by Alejandra Mancilla evaluating the moral force of territorial claims in Antarctica; a review essay by George DeMartino on sensible globalization in an illiberal era; and book reviews by Eleanor Gordon, Marcus Carlsen Häggrot, Shadi Mokhtari, and Serena Parekh.
    09/05/18NewsPress Releases
  • Fighting Fake News, with Anya Schiffrin
    "Disinformation, fake news, online propaganda is a problem that has gotten attention all over the world, and we're seeing very divergent responses," says Schiffrin, author of "Bridging the Gap: Rebuilding Citizen Trust in Media." "I think the U.S. is going to do what it always does, which is look for free-market solutions and try lots of small-scale initiatives, and Europe is going to do what it tends to do, which is have more regulation."
    09/05/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Back to School with Carnegie Council's Online Lessons, Worksheets, Primary Sources, and Activities
    With the new school year in mind Carnegie Council has added timely new high school and undergraduate resources to its extensive online Education Section. These include two new sections, "Thinking Democratically" and "Moral Leadership and the Environment," plus new materials in the "Worksheets and Excerpts on History and Government" section.
    08/29/18NewsPress Releases
  • Cambridge University Press Offers Free Access to Eight Most-Cited "Ethics & International Affairs" Articles
    Free access until the end of October to eight most-cited "Ethics & International Affairs" journal articles from 2017, compliments of Cambridge University Press. Topics include statelessness, refugees, human rights, R2P, Just War, and climate geoengineering.
    08/28/18NewsPress Releases
  • Join Carnegie Council & Organizations around the World: Celebrate Global Ethics Day, October 17, 2018
    Global Ethics Day, October 17, 2018, is an opportunity for institutions to hold events on or around this day to explore the essential role of ethics, globally and in every field.
    08/22/18NewsPress Releases
  • Digital Deception & Dark Money, with Ann M. Ravel
    The term "fake news" is a little too tame, says Ann Ravel of the MapLight Digital Deception Project. Actually, this is foreign and domestic political propaganda aimed at undermining U.S. institutions and democracy. Maplight also tracks the enormous, pervasive problem of "dark money"--contributions by undisclosed donors to influence U.S. campaigns. Yet Ravel is optimistic that once Americans understand what's happening, it can be stopped.
    08/20/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Inexorable Changes in U.S. Foreign Policy?
    Is Trump's presidency a brief aberration after which things will return to normal? That's unlikely, argues Nikolas Gvosdev. In addition to disruptions that have already caused major changes in the international system, ongoing technological, demographic, economic, and military trends are also changing how U.S. foreign policy is understood.
    08/16/18Publications Articles, Papers, and Reports
  • The Populist Appeal of American Decline
    "Is it possible that, in many circles, the decline of American hegemony is something voters are implicitly cheering?" asks Daniel Graeber of Grand Valley State University. If so, why? And how did America's descent contribute to the rise of an experienced, populist leader like Donald Trump? Constructivist theory--the notion in international relations theory that global affairs are influenced by social constructions--provides some answers.
    08/14/18Publications Carnegie Ethics Online
  • Post-Truth, with Lee C. McIntyre
    "Post-truth doesn't mean that no one cares about truth, it doesn't mean that there isn't any such thing as truth, it just means that there's a critical mass of people who no longer think that they have to form their beliefs based on what's true," says philosopher Lee McIntyre. This is not new; it probably goes back to Galileo and science denial. But today post-truth is more virulent than ever, from Trump to Brexit. What can we do about it?
    08/14/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • International Student Essay Contest, 2018: Is it Important to Live in a Democracy?
    This annual essay contest is open to students of all nationalities anywhere in the world. This year's topic: "Is it Important to Live in a Democracy?" The essay should include a definition/explanation of the concept of democracy (written in your own words) and then explain why democracy is or is not important. Length:1,000-1,500 words. Deadline: December 31, 2018.
    08/13/18NewsPress Releases
  • The Vision: Saving the Old or Building the New?
    Senior fellow Nikolas Gvosdev unpacks why some scholars seek to save and preserve the U.S. role in the "liberal international order," and why others want to embrace a new vision.
    08/03/18Publications Articles, Papers, and Reports
  • Migration & Citizenship in the Capitalist State, with Lea Ypi
    "In both political debates and academic debates on migration the question of class is often missed," says London School of Economics' Lea Ypi. "When we reduce migration to a problem of open-versus-closed borders, of accepting or under what terms we accept or exclude migrants, we forget that borders are and have always been and will continue to be, at least under the current regimes, open for some people and closed for other people."
    07/31/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Twitter's Moral Flaws, with Mark Hansen
    Columbia Journalism School's Mark Hansen, along with his students and "New York Times" journalists, conducted deep, firsthand research into Twitter, buying followers and charting networks, but he was left with even more questions. What does "trending" really mean? How does someone become an influencer, and how is influence wielded? Plus, Hansen describes his innovative art installations, one of which is currently on display at the "New York Times" building in Manhattan.
    07/25/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Top 10 Podcasts for the 2017-2018 Program Year
    The number one most accessed Carnegie Council podcast in 2017-2018 was Scott Sagan on nuclear weapons (video), followed by Qin Gao on poverty in China (video), Ambassador Derek Mitchell on Burma (audio), Amy Chua on political tribes (video), and Andreas Harsono on Indonesia (audio).
    07/10/18PublicationsResource Picks

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