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  • Rebuilding the Narrative: Recreating the Rationale for U.S. Leadership, with Ash Jain
    There is skepticism about the core values of U.S. policy from both sides, says Ash Jain of the Atlantic Council, and the international order is under siege as never before. The Atlantic Council has launched an initiative aimed at revitalizing the rules-based democratic order and rebuilding bipartisan support among policymakers and the broader public. In this important discussion Jain explains the initiative's objectives and grapples with the audience's questions on how to move forward.
    05/24/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • A Thousand Small Sanities: The Moral Adventure of Liberalism, with Adam Gopnik
    In his eloquent defense of liberalism, Adam Gopnik goes back to its origins and argues that rather than being emphasizing the role of the individual, "two principles, the principle of community and the principle of compromise," are at the core of the liberal project. Indeed, these are the essential elements of humane, pluralist societies; and in an age of autocracy, our very lives may depend on their continued existence.
    05/22/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Wichita and American Global Engagement
    Senior Fellw Nikolas Gvosdev discusses his takeaways from a visit to the Wichita Committee on Foreign Relations and from a talk from foreign policy analyst Aly Wyne. He writes the U.S. foreign policy establishment needs to work on engendering trust and articulate clearer goals.
    05/21/19Publications
  • Carnegie Council Appoints Ambassador Jean-Marie Guéhenno as Senior Fellow
    Carnegie Council is pleased to announce the appointment of Ambassador Jean-Marie Guéhenno as Senior Fellow. During his two-year fellowship, he will be working on a book tentatively titled "The Second Renaissance: In Search of a New Balance Between the Individual and the Collective." The author of three previous books, Guéhenno is an expert in peacekeeping, transnational security threats, and global governance.
    05/20/19NewsPress Releases
  • 100 Years After Versailles
    Just weeks after an armistice halted the most devastating conflict in generations, the victors of the Great War set out to negotiate the terms of the peace--and to rewrite the rules of international relations. A century later, we live in a world shaped by the Treaty of Versailles. In this fascinating discussion, a panel of distinguished historians delve into the complex situation on the ground at the time and the Treaty's legacy today, from Europe and the U.S. to Asia and the Middle East.
    05/14/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • What Americans Want
    The Center for American Progress has released their exhaustive survey of what Americans want in foreign policy and their results track closely with the conclusions reached by the U.S. Global Engagement study group. What remains to be seen, however, is whether the broad parameters of what Americans want in foreign policy will be taken up by any of the 2020 presidential candidates.
    05/08/19Publications
  • The Generational Divide?
    As Millennials and "Generation Z" begin to enter the ranks of both American politics as well as the expert community, it is uncertain if they will share the same assumptions about the role of the United States in international affairs, writes Nikolas Gvosdev.
    05/07/19Publications
  • How Change Happens, with Cass Sunstein
    From the French Revolution to the Arab Spring to #MeToo, how does social change happen? In a book that was 25 years in the making, Cass Sunstein unpacks this puzzle by exploring the interplay of three decisive factors. Don't miss this insightful talk. It may change how you view the world.
    04/23/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Human Rights, Liberalism, & Ordinary Virtues, with Michael Ignatieff
    Central European University's President Michael Ignatieff is a human rights scholar, an educator, a former politician, and, as he tells us, the son of a refugee. He discusses what he calls "the ordinary virtues," such as patience and tolerance; the status of human rights today and the dilemmas of migration; the essential critera for true democracy; and the ideal curriculum. His advice to students: Learn to think for yourself.
    04/22/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Ethics and Climate Change: Earth Day 2019
    In honor of Earth Day, April 22, 2019, Carnegie Council presents a selection of materials from the past year on the ethical responsibilities and challenges of coping with climate change.
    04/21/19PublicationsResource Picks
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Finance for Social Change & #MeToo, with Criterion Institute's Christina Madden
    Criterion Institute's Christina Madden discusses her think tank's strategy of demystifying finance for non-profit and grassroots organizations and using these global systems to create transformative social change. Madden discusses specific examples, involving the Dakota Access pipeline and the rights of women in the workplace. How is the #MeToo Movement similar to the fight against climate change?
    04/11/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Ethical Implications of Climate Change for Education
    "Education is often tied with privilege and who has access," writes Brian Mateo, assistant dean of civic engagement at Bard College. "Let us not continue to widen the gap because of physical barriers that are affecting children and underrepresented populations in our fast-changing climate."
    04/09/19Publications
  • From Gutenberg to Google: The History of Our Future, with Tom Wheeler
    We've been through information and technology revolutions before, going back to Gutenberg, says former FCC chairman Tom Wheeler. Now it's our turn to be at a terminus of history and the rules that worked for industrial capitalism are probably no longer adequate for Internet capitalism. So our task is not to flee but to stand up, recognize the challenge, and deal with it.
    04/05/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Crack-Up: Egypt & the Wilsonian Moment, with Erez Manela
    For about 18 months after World War I there was what historian Erez Manela calls the "Wilsonian moment"--a brief period when President Woodrow Wilson led people around the world to believe that he would champion a new world order of self-determination and rights for small nations. How did this actually play out, particularly in the case of Egypt, which was a British Protectorate at the time?
    03/26/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • On World Water Day: Think Globally, Act Ethically
    "On this World Water Day (March 22) we urgently need a campaign to disrupt global complacency about protecting the planet's water. We adults, who are in charge of today's policies about water and energy, are doing the same thing to rivers, lakes, and the oceans, as we are doing to the climate: exploiting and extracting as much as we can and as fast as we can without thinking about our children's welfare. What kind of parents have we become?"
    03/21/19Publications
  • Global Ethics Weekly: The Christchurch Attack & Immigration Policies, with Kavitha Rajagopalan
    A week after the horrific terrorist attack on two New Zealand mosques, Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Kavitha Rajagopalan discusses immigration policies and xenophobia in Australia and the United States and how they reverberate throughout the world. How should we respond to hateful rhetoric from politicians? What are some ways to make immigration and asylum work more efficiently and ethically?
    03/21/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Computational Propaganda, with Nick Monaco
    In this in-depth conversation, Oxford Internet Institute researcher Nick Monaco reviews the history of computational propaganda (online disinformation), which goes back almost two decades and includes countries ranging from Mexico to South Korea. His topics include Russia's IRA (Internet Research Agency), the role of China's Huawei, and a recent case study on Taiwan, where "digital democracy meets automated autocracy."
    03/20/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The New Rules of War: Victory in the Age of Durable Disorder, with Sean McFate
    "Nobody fights conventionally except for us anymore, yet we're sinking a big bulk, perhaps the majority of our defense dollars, into preparing for another conventional war, which is the very definition of insanity," declares national security strategist and former paratrooper Sean McFate. The U.S. needs to recognize that we're living in an age of "durable disorder"--a time of persistent, smoldering conflicts--and the old rules no longer apply.
    03/19/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Winners of Carnegie Council's International Student Essay Contest 2018 - Is it Important to Live in a Democracy?
    The topic: Is it important to live in a democracy? Winners come from Argentina, China, Colombia, Ghana, Hungary, South Korea, Tunisia, and the USA. Read their different perspectives here.
    03/12/19NewsPress Releases
  • Why Democracy is the Best We've Got
    "In the face of the global decline of rule of law, freedom of the press, equal representation, separation of powers and freedom of speech, democracy will be resilient--but only if we fight for it. The time is now to advocate for a more democratic world, and many are taking up the cause."
    03/12/19Publications

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