• After Katowice: Three Civil Society Strategies for Ratcheting Up Climate Ambition
    The recent climate conference in Katowice, Poland was a milestone for the Paris Agreement, and it points to the role NGOs can play in encouraging states to ratchet up climate ambition.
    01/18/19Publications
  • 1919 & the Crack Up, with Ted Widmer
    Created and hosted by Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Ted Widmer, "The Crack-Up" is a special podcast series about the events of 1919, a year that in many ways shaped the 20th century and the modern world. And throughout 2019, "The New York Times" will be running long features on the legacy of 1919. These videos explain why 1919 was such an important year, what "the crack-up" means, and previews upcoming essays and podcasts.
    01/17/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: 1919 & the Modern World, with Ted Widmer
    Historian Ted Widmer discusses his new Carnegie Council podcast series "The Crack-Up" and how 1919 has shaped the modern world. He and host Alex Woodson speak about parallels to 2019, Woodrow Wilson and the League of Nations, Babe Ruth, the early days of Hollywood, and populism in Europe in the aftermath of World War I. Don't miss a new "Crack-Up" tomorrow with Harvard historian Lisa McGirr on prohibition and the American state.
    01/17/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Top Risks and Ethical Decisions 2019, with Ian Bremmer
    The wide array of global issues--more than 90 percent of them--that Eurasia Group follows are now headed in the wrong direction in 2019. Eurasia Group president Ian Bremmer break down those risks--from U.S.-China relations and cyberwar to European populism and American institutions--and their ethical implications with Carnegie Council's Devin Stewart for their 11th annual discussion of the year's coming top risks.
    01/16/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Perfect Weapon: War, Sabotage, and Fear in the Cyber Age, with David Sanger
    From the U.S. operation against Iran's nuclear enrichment plant, to Chinese theft of personal data, North Korea's financially motivated attacks on American companies, or Russia's interference in the 2016 election, cyberweapons have become the weapon of choice for democracies, dictators, and terrorists. "New York Times" national security correspondent David Sanger explains how and why cyberattacks are now the number one security threat.
    01/14/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: U.S. Defense Policy After Mattis, with Asha Castleberry
    National security expert and U.S. Army veteran Asha Castleberry makes sense of a busy and seemingly chaotic time for the Department of Defense in the wake of Secretary Mattis' departure. What should think about Trump's plans in Syria and Afghanistan? How is the U.S. planning to counter China in Africa? And has John Bolton actually been a moderating influence?
    01/09/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Crack-Up: Teddy Roosevelt's Complicated Legacy, with Patty O'Toole
    This podcast is part of "The Crack-Up," a special series about the events of 1919, a year that in many ways shaped the 20th century and the modern world. In this episode, host Ted Widmer speaks with fellow historian Patty O'Toole about her "New York Times" article on Teddy Roosevelt, who died 100 years ago this week. Why was health care reform so important to him? What did he think about nationalism? How would TR fit in with the modern GOP?
    01/08/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Technology Run Amok: Crisis Management in the Digital Age, with Ian Mitroff
    Gold leaf tattoos that would act as a screen for our devices, chips implanted in our brains--these are some of the worrying technologies under development with no thought of the consequences to our minds and bodies, says crisis management expert Ian Mitroff. He blames the "technological mindset" that believes that technology will solve every problem. We need technologists, but we also need ethicists and we need to have crisis plans in place.
    01/08/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Jailing of Journalists Worldwide, with CPJ's Elana Beiser
    Elana Beiser of the Committee to Protect Journalists discusses the latest CPJ report, which finds that for the third year in a row, 251 or more journalists are jailed around the world, suggesting the authoritarian approach to critical news coverage is more than a temporary spike. Also for the third year running, Turkey, China, and Egypt were responsible for about half of those imprisoned, with Turkey remaining the world's worst jailer.
    12/19/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Russia's Information Warfare, with Molly McKew
    "You saw the Russians start to pay attention to social media, in particular after Obama's election, because the way that he was elected was new to them. They always watch our elections very closely. So you see them toying around in this whole space of the sphere of information, the use of information as a tool of political warfare, developing new tools." Molly McKew delves into Russian disinformation campaigns in the U.S. and elsewhere.
    12/12/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Control and Responsible Innovation of Artificial Intelligence
    Artificial Intelligence's potential for doing good and creating benefits is almost boundless, but equally there is a potential for doing great harm. This panel discusses the findings of a comprehensive three-year project at The Hastings Center, which encompassed safety procedures, engineering approaches, and legal and ethical oversight.
    12/07/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Misconnecting with the U.S. Public: Narrative Collapse and U.S. Foreign Policy
    For the past year, the U.S. Global Engagement program has focused its attention on the continuing strengths and weaknesses of the narratives that can be used to support an active U.S. role within the global system. These questions have been discussed both within the work of a small study group as well as through a series of focus meetings around the country. Here is the group's interim report.
    12/05/18Publications
  • Breaking News: The Remaking of Journalism and Why It Matters Now, with Alan Rusbridger
    "Were we a business, were we a mission, were we a public service, or were we a profit center?" Alan Rusbridger, former editor-in-chief of "The Guardian," grapples with the questions facing all newspapers in this new age where people "communicate horizontally" rather than via the old, vertical "tablet of stone model." He explains how "The Guardian" has not only survived but prospered and has surprisingly positive things to say about new media.
    12/04/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: The Right to Science, with Helle Porsdam
    The right to benefit from scientific progress was enshrined in the United Nations' 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights, explains University of Copenhagen's Professor Helle Porsdam. Unfortunately, many people, including scientists and policymakers, don't know much about it. How was the right to science developed? What are examples? And, with an anti-science administration in the White House today, what are the contentious issues?
    11/15/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • A Savage Order, with Rachel Kleinfeld
    Can violent societies get better? Rachel Kleinfeld discusses her latest book, "A Savage Order: How the World's Deadliest Countries Can Forge a Path to Security." Her conclusion is ultimately optimistic: Though it's never easy, real democracy (not autocracy in disguise) and a vibrant middle class can provide a path out of violence.
    11/09/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • China Steps Out, with Joshua Eisenman
    In this illuminating conversation, China scholar Joshua Eisenman discusses his two latest books: "Red China's Green Revolution," which overturns the conventional wisdom (both in China and abroad) that Chairman Mao's commune system was a failure; and a co-edited volume "China Steps Out," which explains why for China (unlike the United States), developing regions are a cornerstone of its foreign policy.
    11/02/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Climate Change Mitigation & Governance, with C2G2's Janos Pasztor
    As activists, politicians, and environmentalists come to terms with a dire report on global warming from the UN's IPCC, Janos Pasztor, executive director of the Carnegie Climate Geoengineering Governance Initiative (C2G2), remains focused on the governance of the potential use of climate change "mitigation" technologies. What do these discussions look like in China? What do smaller countries think? And how challenging is it that climate change remains a political divisive issue in the U.S.?
    11/01/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Alternatives to War: From Sanctions to Nonviolence, with James Pattison
    In this interview with the Council's John Krzyzaniak, James Pattison (University of Manchester, UK), discusses his book, "The Alternatives to War." Taking what he calls a "pragmatic approach," Pattison outlines seven sets of alternatives, including economic sanctions and positive incentives. His goal is to offer policymakers a moral map of the main alternatives to war, thinking through the considerations for each one.
    10/29/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Fight for Liberty, with Max Boot, Philip Bobbitt, Garry Kasparov, & Bret Stephens
    We live in a time when liberal democracy is on the defensive, not only in the U.S. but around the world. Yet these speakers, whose roots reflect the political spectrum, are optimistic that having a fresh discussion on moral values and basic principles such as freedom of speech, a free press, and the rule of law can help bring democracy back to health. Don't miss this valuable discussion.
    10/19/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Ethics in Action: Celebrating the Fifth Global Ethics Day, October 17, 2018
    Held every October, Global Ethics Day provides an opportunity for organizations around the world to hold events for people to explore the crucial role of ethics in their professions and their daily lives, each in their own way. This year, activities include activities to raise girls' self-esteem in Nigeria; a movie screening and panel discussion in Poland in memory of Kofi Annan; and a conference on journalism, ethics, and fake news in Venezuela.
    10/17/18NewsPress Releases

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