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  • Winners of Carnegie Council's International Student Essay Contest 2018 - Is it Important to Live in a Democracy?
    The topic: Is it important to live in a democracy? Winners come from Argentina, China, Colombia, Ghana, Hungary, South Korea, Tunisia, and the USA. Read their different perspectives here.
    03/12/19NewsPress Releases
  • Why Democracy is the Best We've Got
    "In the face of the global decline of rule of law, freedom of the press, equal representation, separation of powers and freedom of speech, democracy will be resilient--but only if we fight for it. The time is now to advocate for a more democratic world, and many are taking up the cause."
    03/12/19Publications
  • Climate Change and Competing Ethical Visions
    The prevailing narrative in the fight against climate change is that we must adopt more cooperative efforts to help vulnerable populations. But what if, instead of this collective approach, countering climate change turns into a zero-sum game for nation-states?
    03/07/19Publications
  • Global Ethics Weekly: AI Governance & Ethics, with Wendell Wallach
    Wendell Wallach, consultant, ethicist, and scholar at the Yale Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics, discusses some of the current issues in artificial intelligence (AI), including his push for international governance of the technology. He and host Alex Woodson also speak about Trump's recent executive order, universal basic income, and some of the ethical issues in China concerning AI, including the Social Credit System.
    03/07/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Save the Date! Carnegie Council Announces Sixth Annual Global Ethics Day, October 16, 2019
    Carnegie Council announces the sixth annual Global Ethics Day (#globalethicsday2019) on the third Wednesday in October: October 16, 2019. Global Ethics Day provides an opportunity for organizations around the world to hold events on or around this day, exploring the crucial role of ethics in their professions and their daily lives, each in their own way. For more information on how to participate, go to https.globalethicsday.org.
    03/05/19NewsPress Releases
  • The Enduring False Promise of Preventive War, with Scott A. Silverstone
    Does preventive war really work? "In the vast majority of cases historically, what we see is the country that thought it was saving itself from a greater danger in the future actually creates this greater danger because you generate a level of hostility, a deepening rivalry, and a desire for revenge that comes back to haunt them," says Scott Silverstone. His advice: Hesitate. Before taking action, think through this "preventive war paradox."
    02/26/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Jingjing Zhang: Greening China's Globalization
    Born in China, environmental lawyer Jingjing Zhang is working to hold China accountable for the negative impacts of its overseas investment and construction projects, the value of which is close to $2 trillion. Known as the "Erin Brockovich of China," she investigates cases from Africa to Latin America to Southeast Asia, to ensure Chinese companies' compliance with environmental laws and international human rights standards.
    02/20/19Publications
  • Carnegie Council Presents "The Crack-Up," a Podcast Series about the Pivotal Year of 1919
    Created and hosted by historian and Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Ted Widmer, "The Crack-Up" is a special podcast series about the events of 1919, a turbulent year that in many ways shaped the 20th century and the modern world. Widmer is working with The "New York Times" on a series of long features on the legacy of 1919 and these podcasts are designed to complement the articles by interviewing each of the authors.
    02/12/19NewsPress Releases
  • China's Cognitive Warfare, with Rachael Burton
    How is China influencing democracies such as Taiwan, Korea, and the United States? "I think there are three areas that you can look at," says Asia security analyst Rachael Burton. "The first is narrative dominance, which I would call a form of cognitive warfare. Beijing has been able to set the terms of debate . . . and once you're asking the questions, then you're able to drive intellectuals or policymakers to a certain answer."
    02/11/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Crack-Up: The Early Days of Hollywood, with David Bordwell
    In this episode of The Crack-Up series, which explores how 1919 shaped the modern world, film historian David Bordwell discusses two big changes in the American film industry in 1919: the revolt of film stars against the powerful studio system, and Paramount's response, which was to try and control the "product" from creation to point of consumption. He goes on to look at how these creative and commercial tensions still play out today.
    02/08/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Ethics in Business: In Their Own Words, with Cargill's David MacLennan
    David MacLennan, chairman and CEO of Cargill, discusses the role of ethics in his work leading an agriculture, food, and nutrition company that is present in over 70 countries. He explains Cargill's work in the community, its emphasis on diversity, and the importance of keeping his employees safe.
    02/06/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Toward a Human-Centric Approach to Cybersecurity, with Ronald Deibert
    Discussions around cybersecurity often focus on the security and sovereignty of states, not individuals, says Professor Ronald Deibert, founder and director of University of Toronto's Citizen Lab. If you start from a "human-centric perspective," it could lead to policies focusing on peace, prosperity, and human rights. How can we work toward this approach?
    01/29/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Ethics as a Campaign Platform, with Sujata Gadkar-Wilcox
    Quinnipiac University's Sujata Gadkar-Wilcox speaks about her 2018 campaign for state representative in Connecticut, which she lost by a slim margin. After months of speaking to her fellow citizens and absorbing their differing viewpoints on the campaign trail, she discusses the importance of ethics and political engagement and how we can remain civil in this divisive time.
    01/24/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • After Katowice: Three Civil Society Strategies for Ratcheting Up Climate Ambition
    The recent climate conference in Katowice, Poland was a milestone for the Paris Agreement, and it points to the role NGOs can play in encouraging states to ratchet up climate ambition.
    01/18/19Publications
  • 1919 & the Crack Up, with Ted Widmer
    Created and hosted by Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Ted Widmer, "The Crack-Up" is a special podcast series about the events of 1919, a year that in many ways shaped the 20th century and the modern world. And throughout 2019, "The New York Times" will be running long features on the legacy of 1919. These videos explain why 1919 was such an important year, what "the crack-up" means, and previews upcoming essays and podcasts.
    01/17/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: 1919 & the Modern World, with Ted Widmer
    Historian Ted Widmer discusses his new Carnegie Council podcast series "The Crack-Up" and how 1919 has shaped the modern world. He and host Alex Woodson speak about parallels to 2019, Woodrow Wilson and the League of Nations, Babe Ruth, the early days of Hollywood, and populism in Europe in the aftermath of World War I. Don't miss a new "Crack-Up" tomorrow with Harvard historian Lisa McGirr on prohibition and the American state.
    01/17/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Top Risks and Ethical Decisions 2019, with Ian Bremmer
    The wide array of global issues--more than 90 percent of them--that Eurasia Group follows are now headed in the wrong direction in 2019. Eurasia Group president Ian Bremmer breaks down those risks--from U.S.-China relations and cyberwar to European populism and American institutions--and their ethical implications with Carnegie Council's Devin Stewart for their 11th annual discussion of the year's coming top risks.
    01/16/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Perfect Weapon: War, Sabotage, and Fear in the Cyber Age, with David Sanger
    From the U.S. operation against Iran's nuclear enrichment plant, to Chinese theft of personal data, North Korea's financially motivated attacks on American companies, or Russia's interference in the 2016 election, cyberweapons have become the weapon of choice for democracies, dictators, and terrorists. "New York Times" national security correspondent David Sanger explains how and why cyberattacks are now the number one security threat.
    01/14/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: U.S. Defense Policy After Mattis, with Asha Castleberry
    National security expert and U.S. Army veteran Asha Castleberry makes sense of a busy and seemingly chaotic time for the Department of Defense in the wake of Secretary Mattis' departure. What should think about Trump's plans in Syria and Afghanistan? How is the U.S. planning to counter China in Africa? And has John Bolton actually been a moderating influence?
    01/09/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Crack-Up: Teddy Roosevelt's Complicated Legacy, with Patty O'Toole
    This podcast is part of "The Crack-Up," a special series about the events of 1919, a year that in many ways shaped the 20th century and the modern world. In this episode, host Ted Widmer speaks with fellow historian Patty O'Toole about her "New York Times" article on Teddy Roosevelt, who died 100 years ago this week. Why was health care reform so important to him? What did he think about nationalism? How would TR fit in with the modern GOP?
    01/08/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts

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