• Identity: The Demand for Dignity and the Politics of Resentment, with Francis Fukuyama
    The rise of global populism is the greatest threat to global democracy, and it's mainly driven not by economics, but by people's demand for public recognition of their identities, says political scientist Francis Fukuyama. "We want other people to affirm our worth, and that has to be a political act." How is this playing out in the U.S., Europe, and Asia? What practical steps can we take to counteract it?
    09/17/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Future Politics, with Jamie Susskind
    There are three major technological developments that are transforming the way we live, says Jamie Susskind: increasingly capable systems, increasingly integrated technology, and increasingly quantified society. With these we are moving into the "digital lifeworld," which is basically a different stage of human existence. What will these momentous changes mean for the future of politics and society--i.e. how we order our collective lives?
    09/14/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Fighting Fake News, with Anya Schiffrin
    "Disinformation, fake news, online propaganda is a problem that has gotten attention all over the world, and we're seeing very divergent responses," says Schiffrin, author of "Bridging the Gap: Rebuilding Citizen Trust in Media." "I think the U.S. is going to do what it always does, which is look for free-market solutions and try lots of small-scale initiatives, and Europe is going to do what it tends to do, which is have more regulation."
    09/05/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Cambridge University Press Offers Free Access to Eight Most-Cited "Ethics & International Affairs" Articles
    Free access until the end of October to eight most-cited "Ethics & International Affairs" journal articles from 2017, compliments of Cambridge University Press. Topics include statelessness, refugees, human rights, R2P, Just War, and climate geoengineering.
    08/28/18NewsPress Releases
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Truth & Identity Politics, with Alexander Görlach
    Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Alexander Görlach and host Alex Woodson speak about identity politics in the United States and Europe from their different perspectives. They also discuss how religion and the recent Mexican election fits in to these narratives.
    08/23/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Post-Truth, with Lee C. McIntyre
    "Post-truth doesn't mean that no one cares about truth, it doesn't mean that there isn't any such thing as truth, it just means that there's a critical mass of people who no longer think that they have to form their beliefs based on what's true," says philosopher Lee McIntyre. This is not new; it probably goes back to Galileo and science denial. But today post-truth is more virulent than ever, from Trump to Brexit. What can we do about it?
    08/14/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Rise and Fall (and Rise) of Chemical Weapons
    "Chemical weapons have been used in almost every decade since their advent just over a century ago. They are not a specter, like nuclear weapons. We know their effects, and how numerous states have employed them, and how they might do so in the future. In fact, after a few decades of relative non-use, chemical-weapons attacks have again exploded onto the scene--as a weapon of war, terror, and as a tool of state assassination."
    08/07/18Publications Articles, Papers, and Reports
  • Migration & Citizenship in the Capitalist State, with Lea Ypi
    "In both political debates and academic debates on migration the question of class is often missed," says London School of Economics' Lea Ypi. "When we reduce migration to a problem of open-versus-closed borders, of accepting or under what terms we accept or exclude migrants, we forget that borders are and have always been and will continue to be, at least under the current regimes, open for some people and closed for other people."
    07/31/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Guatemala's German Connection & Latin American Unity, with Henning Andrés Droege
    What is Guatemala's German connection and how has it changed over time? What is Guatemala's role in geopolitics? Could Latin America form a similar organization to the EU and thus tap into the tremendous potential for synergy among Latin American countries? Learn more, in this fascinating conversation with entrepreneur and former diplomat Henning Andrés Droege.
    06/26/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • A "Values-Free" Trans-Atlantic Relationship?
    Can an enduring and effective trans-Atlantic relationship be constructed and maintained without reference to commonly-shared values, in other words, can there be a "values-free" partnership?
    06/22/18Publications Articles, Papers, and Reports
  • Russian Soft Power in France, with Marlene Laruelle & Jean-Yves Camus
    It's important to understand that Russia and France have had a centuries-long relationship which is mostly positive, say French scholars Marlene Laruelle and Jean-Yves Camus. Today there are layers of close economic and cultural ties, as well as common geopolitical interests, and the French extreme right and Russia share many of the same conservative values. Thus the remarkable strength of Russian influence in France is not surprising.
    06/20/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • LGBT Rights & International Affairs in Mexico, with Genaro Lozano
    Professor Genaro Lozano of Ibero-American University in Mexico City is also a TV presenter, columnist, and LGBT activist. He discusses the long history and current "fragmented scenario" of LGBT rights in Mexico and other Latin American countries and also explores U.S.-Mexico relations, especially since Trump's election. Meanwhile Mexico is not standing still. It has free trade agreements with the EU and others, and China may be next.
    06/19/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Restoring Trust: How Can the American Public Regain its Confidence in its National Security Apparatus?
    There is a huge divide in the way Americans assess U.S. foreign policy. Take for example, the June G7 meeting, which ended in a clash between Trump and some of America's closest allies: Some say it was a disaster; others say Trump did the right thing. Where do we go from here to restore trust in expertise and government? Don't miss this fascinating conversation with two leading commentators, Colin Dueck and Kori Schake.
    06/13/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Brazilian Identity, Western Culture, & Institutions, with Eduardo Wolf
    Eduardo Wolf is a professor of ancient philosophy and ethics, and a newspaper editor in São Paulo, Brazil. He discusses the similarities and differences between studies in Latin America and Europe/North America, and the struggle to find the the essence of Brazilian identity--a struggle common to former colonies, he argues. He also explores the "communitarian reaction" against globalization and its focus on individual identity.
    06/12/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Edge of Chaos, with Dambisa Moyo
    Why is democracy under siege around the world? Economist Dambisa Moyo cites a host of reasons, such as short-term thinking, low voter turnout, the huge sums spent on lobbying, and growing economic challenges. To fix these problems, she has 10 proposals for countries to choose from. They include compulsory voting and paying politicians more in order to stop corruption while also forcing them to be accountable for their policies.
    06/12/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • HATE: Why We Should Resist It with Free Speech, Not Censorship, with Nadine Strossen
    Nadine Strossen gives a rousing, detailed, and convincing defense of free speech as it is laid out in the First Amendment. "American law really is nuanced and makes a great deal of common sense," she says and while censorship of 'hate speech' in other countries is certainly well-intended, in practice the laws have proven to do more harm than good.
    06/11/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Just Out: "Ethics & International Affairs" Summer 2018 Issue
    This issue features Lea Ypi on the importance of social class in debates about migration; Jennifer L. Tobin on international investment agreements and "regulatory chill'"; Cristina Cielo and Lisset Coba on the intersection of gender and disease in extractive economies; Gregory M. Reichberg and Henrik Syse on the ethics of threats in international relations; Alasia Nuti on the structural injustices that characterize temporary labor migration within the EU; Cian O'Driscoll on contemporary just war thinking; and Emma S. Norman on a global water ethic.
    06/08/18NewsPress Releases
  • Ethics & International Affairs Volume 32.2 (Summer 2018)
    This issue features Lea Ypi on the importance of social class in debates about migration; Jennifer L. Tobin on international investment agreements and "regulatory chill'"; Cristina Cielo and Lisset Coba on the intersection of gender and disease in extractive economies; Gregory M. Reichberg and Henrik Syse on the ethics of threats in international relations; Alasia Nuti on the structural injustices that characterize temporary labor migration within the EU; Cian O'Driscoll on contemporary just war thinking; and Emma S. Norman on a global water ethic.
    06/08/18Publications Ethics & International Affairs
  • "Samuel Huntington ignored Latin America as part of the West," says Homero Aridjis
    For Homero Aridjis, a distinguished Mexican poet, author, activist, and diplomat, "the West" means countries that follow Greco-Latin culture--not Anglo-Saxon culture, he says pointedly. So why is Latin America ignored? Centuries ago, the Spaniards brought architecture, philosophy, religion, art, and literature to Latin America. In many ways these nations are keeping Western culture alive, he argues, as Europeans lose their Western identity.
    06/05/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Golden Visas, Dreamers, & Ethics in Immigration, with Ayelet Shachar
    There is a global surge in "golden visas" for the super-rich, who often have "no connection to the country other than a wire transfer, the ability to press a button, and pass a significant sum of money across borders," says Ayelet Shachar. Countries offering these include the U.S., the UK, and Malta. Yet in the U.S. the "dreamers," who grew up in America, are being denied citizenship. Do we really believe these visas are fair?
    06/04/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts

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