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  • Living in an "Illiberal Democracy"
    "Today, virtually all countries make claim to democracy, even conspicuous dictatorships such as the Democratic People's Republic of Korea," writes Gergely Bérces from Hungary. "Reality, however, increasingly consists of citizens of ostensibly democratic countries sacrificing their freedoms, violating human rights, and, paradoxically, extinguishing democracy-—their own and those of others—-in the name of democracy."
    03/12/19Publications
  • The Enduring False Promise of Preventive War, with Scott A. Silverstone
    Does preventive war really work? "In the vast majority of cases historically, what we see is the country that thought it was saving itself from a greater danger in the future actually creates this greater danger because you generate a level of hostility, a deepening rivalry, and a desire for revenge that comes back to haunt them," says Scott Silverstone. His advice: Hesitate. Before taking action, think through this "preventive war paradox."
    02/26/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • How to Think about War: An Ancient Guide to Foreign Policy, with Johanna Hanink
    Why has there been a sudden interest in Thucydides, especially in the U.S.? Johanna Hanink discusses her new book of translations and introductions to key speeches from his "History of the Peloponnesian War," and the importance of the classics in general. "The book is of special interest to us here at Carnegie for its focus on ethics, democracy, and world affairs, all of which seem to be under stress these days," says Joel Rosenthal.
    02/25/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Crack-Up: Jazz Arrives, Loudly, in 1919, with David Sager
    In this fascinating podcast, Ted Widmer talks to jazz historian David Sager about his "New York Times" essay on the genre's breakthrough in 1919, its popularity in France during World War I, and the tragic story of legendary African American bandleader James Reese Europe.
    02/22/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Carnegie Council Presents "The Crack-Up," a Podcast Series about the Pivotal Year of 1919
    Created and hosted by historian and Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Ted Widmer, "The Crack-Up" is a special podcast series about the events of 1919, a turbulent year that in many ways shaped the 20th century and the modern world. Widmer is working with The "New York Times" on a series of long features on the legacy of 1919 and these podcasts are designed to complement the articles by interviewing each of the authors.
    02/12/19NewsPress Releases
  • Global Ethics Weekly: The Situation in Western Sahara, with Ambassador Sidi Omar
    Ambassador Sidi Omar, UN representative for Frente POLISARIO, a liberation movement aiming to secure the independence of Western Sahara, discusses the decades-long dispute in Northwest Africa. With negotiations ongoing between Frente POLISARIO and Morocco at the UN, could there be a resolution? How do Europe and the Trump administration fit in?
    02/07/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • A Chance for Peace in Western Sahara
    "For over a century, the people of Western Sahara have been denied our fundamental right to decide our future," writes Sidi Omar, UN representative for Frente POLISARIO, a liberation movement aiming to secure the independence of Western Sahara. Recent months have seen a flurry of diplomatic activity, prompted by the Trump administration and the appointment of a new personal envoy for the UN secretary-general. Will there be peace at last?
    02/05/19Publications
  • The Crack-Up: Ireland's Quest for Self-Determination, with Christopher L. Pastore
    In the third podcast in The Crack-Up series, which looks at how 1919 shaped the modern world, Ted Widmer discusses the story of the Irish Declaration of Independence with fellow historian Christopher Pastore. Although the declaration was signed in 1919, Ireland's quest for self-determination would last for decades. How did America influence these developments? What did the Irish leaders think about nationalism so soon after World War I?
    01/30/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Toward a Human-Centric Approach to Cybersecurity, with Ronald Deibert
    Discussions around cybersecurity often focus on the security and sovereignty of states, not individuals, says Professor Ronald Deibert, founder and director of University of Toronto's Citizen Lab. If you start from a "human-centric perspective," it could lead to policies focusing on peace, prosperity, and human rights. How can we work toward this approach?
    01/29/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • After Katowice: Three Civil Society Strategies for Ratcheting Up Climate Ambition
    The recent climate conference in Katowice, Poland was a milestone for the Paris Agreement, and it points to the role NGOs can play in encouraging states to ratchet up climate ambition.
    01/18/19Publications
  • 1919 & the Crack Up, with Ted Widmer
    Created and hosted by Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Ted Widmer, "The Crack-Up" is a special podcast series about the events of 1919, a year that in many ways shaped the 20th century and the modern world. And throughout 2019, "The New York Times" will be running long features on the legacy of 1919. These videos explain why 1919 was such an important year, what "the crack-up" means, and previews upcoming essays and podcasts.
    01/17/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: 1919 & the Modern World, with Ted Widmer
    Historian Ted Widmer discusses his new Carnegie Council podcast series "The Crack-Up" and how 1919 has shaped the modern world. He and host Alex Woodson speak about parallels to 2019, Woodrow Wilson and the League of Nations, Babe Ruth, the early days of Hollywood, and populism in Europe in the aftermath of World War I. Don't miss a new "Crack-Up" tomorrow with Harvard historian Lisa McGirr on prohibition and the American state.
    01/17/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Top Risks and Ethical Decisions 2019, with Ian Bremmer
    The wide array of global issues--more than 90 percent of them--that Eurasia Group follows are now headed in the wrong direction in 2019. Eurasia Group president Ian Bremmer breaks down those risks--from U.S.-China relations and cyberwar to European populism and American institutions--and their ethical implications with Carnegie Council's Devin Stewart for their 11th annual discussion of the year's coming top risks.
    01/16/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Jailing of Journalists Worldwide, with CPJ's Elana Beiser
    Elana Beiser of the Committee to Protect Journalists discusses the latest CPJ report, which finds that for the third year in a row, 251 or more journalists are jailed around the world, suggesting the authoritarian approach to critical news coverage is more than a temporary spike. Also for the third year running, Turkey, China, and Egypt were responsible for about half of those imprisoned, with Turkey remaining the world's worst jailer.
    12/19/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Most Popular Carnegie Council Resources, 2018
    Carnegie Council presents its most popular resources created in 2018. Topics include solutions to inequality, Russian influence in France, democracy in danger, the situation in Burma/Myanmar, artificial intelligence, and much more.
    12/18/18NewsPress Releases
  • Russia's Information Warfare, with Molly McKew
    "You saw the Russians start to pay attention to social media, in particular after Obama's election, because the way that he was elected was new to them. They always watch our elections very closely. So you see them toying around in this whole space of the sphere of information, the use of information as a tool of political warfare, developing new tools." Molly McKew delves into Russian disinformation campaigns in the U.S. and elsewhere.
    12/12/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: The End of World War I & the Future of American Democracy, with Ted Widmer
    Historian and Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Ted Widmer looks back to the end of the First World War, and the upheaval that followed it in Europe and the U.S., and forward to a new stage in the Trump presidency. Plus, he and host Alex Woodson discuss ways to improve American democracy and what can be learned from the legacy of President George H. W. Bush.
    12/06/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Refining Strategic Autonomy: A Call for European Grand Strategy
    Europe has come to realize that the United States is no longer the stalwart ally of the Cold War era. With the resurgence of China, the return of Russia, the retreat of the United States, and the rise of the rest, Europe needs to define its own grand strategy.
    12/05/18Publications
  • Breaking News: The Remaking of Journalism and Why It Matters Now, with Alan Rusbridger
    "Were we a business, were we a mission, were we a public service, or were we a profit center?" Alan Rusbridger, former editor-in-chief of "The Guardian," grapples with the questions facing all newspapers in this new age where people "communicate horizontally" rather than via the old, vertical "tablet of stone model." He explains how "The Guardian" has not only survived but prospered and has surprisingly positive things to say about new media.
    12/04/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Jungle Grows Back: America and Our Imperiled World, with Robert Kagan
    "The analogy that is at the heart of this book is about a jungle and a garden," says Robert Kagan. "In order to have a garden and sustain a garden, you've got to be constantly gardening. For me at least, that is a good analogy for this liberal world order, which itself is an unnatural creation which natural forces are always working to undermine." Human nature has not fundamentally changed, and this peaceful period is an aberration.
    11/20/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts

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