• AI as a Tool for Workers' Empowerment, with Christina J. Colclough
    Following up on the AI & Equality Initiative's first webinar on artificial intelligence and the future of work, Carnegie-Uehiro Fellow Wendell Wallach and Dr. Christina Colclough, founder of The Why Not Lab, build on that discussion with a conversation about the future of the worker. How can new technology be used to empower workers? What are some progressive strategies and policies that can help to reach this goal?
    11/13/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • AI, the Future of Work, & 21st Century Challenges for the Social Contract, with James Manyika
    Can artificial intelligence (AI) be deployed in ways that enhance equality, or will these systems exacerbate existing structural inequalities and create new ones? In this webinar McKinsey Global Institute's James Manyika and Carnegie-Uehiro Fellow Wendell Wallach delve into questions concerning the ethical implications of AI, the present and future of work in the United States and Europe, and the evolution of the social contract.
    10/20/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Democratic Community: A Path for U.S. Engagement? with Ash Jain
    Polling data suggests that the American public is not in favor of isolationism, but wants to adjust the terms of U.S. engagement. In this webinar, the Atlantic Council's Ash Jain and Senior Fellows Nikolas Gvosdev and Tatiana Serafin assess the “democratic community” approach. Will deepening cooperation with an alliance of democracies be the way forward?
    10/15/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Doorstep: Spy Games & Trump's Health, Pence vs. Harris, & Europe's Refugee Crisis, with Politico's Nahal Toosi
    In the second episode of "The Doorstep" hosts Tatiana Serafin and Nikolas Gvosdev discuss the counterintelligence aspect of President Trump's health crisis, the main street USA reverberations of the seemingly far away conflict in Nagorno-Karabakh, the vice presidential debate and American leadership, and what lessons the U.S. can learn from Europe's refugee crisis. Nahal Toosi, foreign affairs correspondent for "Politico," joins the hosts for this episode to discuss what foreign policy might look like in 2021 and beyond.
    10/09/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Doorstep: Financial Scandals, Trump vs. Biden, & What To Do About China
    Hosted by award-winning professor of journalism Tatiana Serafin, with international relations scholar and Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev, The Doorstep is an innovative international news podcast that invites listeners to recognize that all global news is local in a borderless Internet. The first podcast features a review of under the radar news like the leaked FinCEN files and the second wave of COVID-19 hitting Europe and how these impact American citizens; a look ahead at what to expect from the from the first presidential debate next week; and a discussion of the China-U.S. frenemy relationship and how that might impact U.S. consumers, especially TikTok and WeChat users.
    09/25/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Ethical Dilemmas in Ensuring Human Security
    In this blog post, Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev reflects on his recent "Human Security is National Security in a Time of Pandemic" webinar with Derek Reveron. What are the ethical considerations for policymakers that involve real human security trade-offs?
    07/28/20Publications
  • Great Power Populism, COVID-19, & Missing Leadership, with Damjan Krnjević Mišković & Nikolas Gvosdev
    What is "great power populism" and what does it mean during the pandemic? Are we heading towards another global conflict? And are there any leaders who can inspire the "international community" during a crisis? ADA University's Damjan Krnjević Mišković and Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev share their thoughts on the causes and characteristics of the ongoing "nervous breakdown" in the international system.
    05/12/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • COVID-19 & the Future of Health Data, with Mona Sloane
    The implementation of contact tracing and the collection of health data may be necessary for life to return to "normal" in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic, but is there any way to make sure these practices don't turn into "tools of oppression"? Mona Sloane, fellow at NYU's Institute for Public Knowledge, discusses her concerns about the "normalization" of these technologies and the effect that these strategies could have on vulnerable communities.
    05/05/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Health Data, Privacy, & Surveillance: How Will the Lockdowns End? with Effy Vayena & Jeffrey Kahn
    How should we think about privacy and government surveillance during the COVID-19 pandemic? Johns Hopkins' Jeffrey Kahn and ETH Zurich's Effy Vayena discuss health data and government surveillance, focusing on contract tracing apps in Europe and immunity certificates in the United States, with Carnegie Council President Joel Rosenthal in this virtual webinar.
    04/24/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Ethics, Surveillance, & the Coronavirus Pandemic, with Arthur Holland Michel
    As U.S. states and European nations contemplate how to end the COVID-19 quarantine, Senior Fellow Arthur Holland Michel discusses all aspects of surveillance and ethics. From ongoing issues in Baltimore to technologies focused on location data to the future of privacy and government regulation in a post-pandemic world, Michel and host Alex Woodson look at the current "Cambrian explosion" in surveillance technology.
    04/20/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Fractured Globalization & Dissolving Ethics, with Nikolas Gvosdev
    If global interconnections begin to fray in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, what happens to the ethical underpinnings of international relations? Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev and Carnegie Council President Joel Rosenthal discuss this important question and much more as solidarity begins to weaken among European Union and NATO states.
    04/17/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • COVID-19: Eroding the Ethics of Solidarity?
    "Solidarity is easy when there is no perceived cost or major sacrifice entailed," writes Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev. How has the COVID-19 pandemic stress-tested the depths and resilience of solidarity between states?
    04/08/20Publications
  • Hungary and the Values Test
    In the wake of the Hungarian parliament's vote to allow the executive to rule by decree, Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev reflects on the call by some to expel Hungary from the North Atlantic Treaty Organization--on the grounds that the country no longer upholds the liberal-democratic values that should form the basis of the security association.
    03/31/20Publications
  • The Future of Artificial Intelligence, with Stuart J. Russell
    UC Berkley's Professor Stuart J. Russell discusses the near- and far-future of artificial intelligence, including self-driving cars, killer robots, governance, and why he's worried that AI might destroy the world. How can scientists reconfigure AI systems so that humans will always be in control? How can we govern this emerging technology across borders? What can be done if autonomous weapons are deployed in 2020?
    02/24/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Gallagher's Proposal & Emerging Narratives
    Rep. Michael Gallagher (R-WI) recently penned a "Wall Street Journal" op-ed laying out a new paradigm for U.S. foreign policy, as it relates to trade and "great power competition" against China, with a call for the U.S., the UK, and other like-minded nations to forge a new trade and technological alliance. Nikolas Gvosdev analyzes this idea in the context of changing U.S. foreign policy narratives.
    02/11/20Publications
  • The Crack-Up: The Birth of the Modern Middle East, with Ted Widmer
    At the end of World War I, colonial powers carved up the Ottoman Empire and the reverberations are still being felt today. Historian Ted Widmer discusses the circumstances that led to this fateful episode and why Woodrow Wilson wasn't able to extend his principle of "self-determination" to the Middle East. How should we think about the Trump-Netanyahu peace plan in the context of what happened in Palestine in 1919?
    01/31/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Privacy, Surveillance, & the Terrorist Trap, with Tom Parker
    How can investigators utilize new technology like facial recognition software while respecting the rights of suspects and the general public? What are the consequences of government overreaction to terrorist threats? Tom Parker, author of "Avoiding the Terrorist Trap," discusses privacy, surveillance, and more in the context of counterterrorism.
    01/14/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Gene Editing Governance & Dr. He Jiankui, with Jeffrey Kahn
    Jeffrey Kahn, director of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute for Bioethics, discusses the many governance issues connected to gene editing. Plus, he gives a first-hand account of an historic conference in Hong Kong last year in which Dr. He Jiankui shared his research on the birth of the world's first germline genetically engineered babies. What's the future of the governance of this emerging technology?
    12/02/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Gene Editing: Overview, Ethics, & the Near Future, with Robert Klitzman
    In the first in a series of podcasts on gene editing, Columbia's Dr. Robert Klitzman provides an overview of the technology, ethical and governance issues, and where it could all go in the near future. Plus he explains why the birth of genetically engineered twins in China last year was a "seismic" event. How could gene editing lead to more inequality? What could be some of unintended consequences?
    11/20/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • AI in the Arctic: Future Opportunities & Ethical Concerns, with Fritz Allhoff
    How can artificial intelligence improve food security, medicine, and infrastructure in Arctic communities? What are some logistical, ethical, and governance challenges? Western Michigan's Professor Fritz Allhoff details the future of technology in this extreme environment, which is being made more accessible because of climate change. Plus he shares his thoughts on some open philosophical questions surrounding AI.
    11/13/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts

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