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  • Italy Considers China's Belt & Road, with Giulio Pugliese
    King's College's Giulio Pugliese and Senior Fellow Devin Stewart discuss the political climate in Italy, with the Northern League and the Five Star Movement representing various types of dissatisfaction with the status quo, and China's increasing interest in the nation via its Belt and Road Initiative. What could Italy get out of this relationship? What kinds of concerns do Italians have about Xi Jinping's China?
    07/01/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Romanian Diaspora's Impact on European Stability
    The results of last month's European Parliament elections and justice referendum in Romania "delivered a humiliating blow to its ruling populist coalition," writes journalist Teodor Stan. The vote also shows the impact a diaspora can have, especially one as large as Romania's, which is estimated at over 4 million. There is a lot to learn about transnational politics, liberalism, and diasporas by taking a closer look at Romanian politics.
    06/27/19Publications
  • Ill Winds: Saving Democracy from Russian Rage, Chinese Ambition, and American Complacency, with Larry Diamond
    Larry Diamond's core argument is stark: the defense and advancement of democratic ideals relies on U.S. global leadership. If the U.S. does not reclaim its traditional place as the keystone of democracy, today's authoritarian trend could become a tsunami that could provide an opening for Vladimir Putin, Xi Jinping, and their admirers to turn the 21st century into a dark time of surging authoritarianism.
    06/20/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Crack-Up: A Hundred Years of Student Protests in China, with Jeffrey Wasserstrom
    In the latest "Crack-Up" podcast, China expert Jeffrey Wasserstrom discusses the rich history of Chinese student protests. From the May Fourth movement in 1919 to Tiananmen Square in 1989 to today's mass demonstrations in Hong Kong, what are the threads that tie these moments together? Don't miss this fascinating talk, which also touches on Woodrow Wilson, the Russian Revolution, and a young Mao Zedong.
    06/17/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Speech Police: The Global Struggle to Govern the Internet, with David Kaye
    The original idea of the Internet was for it be a "free speech nirvana," but in 2019, the reality is quite different. Authoritarians spread disinformation and extremists incite hatred, often on the huge, U.S.-based platforms, YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter. David Kaye, UN special rapporteur on freedom of opinion & expression, details the different approaches to these issues in Europe and the United States and looks for solutions in this informed and important talk.
    06/13/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: U.S.-Russian Relations, Ukraine, & the G-20, with Nikolas Gvosdev
    Following up on his talk with RAND analyst Ali Wyne on great-power competition, Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev gives an update on U.S.-Russian relations, touching on the war in Eastern Ukraine, the crisis in Venezuela, and election interference. He also previews the upcoming G-20 Summit in Japan, with Trump possibly hampered by his domestic controversies and talk of impeachment.
    06/11/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • How to Lose a Country: The 7 Steps from Democracy to Dictatorship, with Ece Temelkuran
    In her new book, award-winning Turkish novelist and political commentator Ece Temelkuran lays out the seven steps from democracy to dictatorship. "Some of these steps might be invisible to people even when they are living in it," she says, "so I wanted to make sure that people of the world, especially Western societies, can see what is happening to them so they won't lose time like we did in Turkey. I hope they won't end up losing their country as we did."
    06/03/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Rebuilding the Narrative: Recreating the Rationale for U.S. Leadership, with Ash Jain
    There is skepticism about the core values of U.S. policy from both sides, says Ash Jain of the Atlantic Council, and the international order is under siege as never before. The Atlantic Council has launched an initiative aimed at revitalizing the rules-based democratic order and rebuilding bipartisan support among policymakers and the broader public. In this important discussion Jain explains the initiative's objectives and grapples with the audience's questions on how to move forward.
    05/24/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Millennials, Climate Change, & Foreign Policy, with Nikolas Gvosdev
    Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev discusses the generational divide in U.S. politics in the context of foreign policy and the environment. What are the international implications of initiatives like the Green New Deal? What would an "America First" environmental policy look like? And what happens if the U.S. continues to take a backseat on this issue?
    05/23/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Carnegie Council Announces Robert J. Myers Fellows for 2019
    The Robert J. Myers Fellows Fund supports and promotes activities of the Carnegie Council network that embody Mr. Myers' vision of effective ethical inquiry rooted in local experiences and communities. This year 13 projects were chosen, with a diverse range of issues concerning China, the Czech Republic, Africa, Germany, Indonesia, Japan, Montenegro, Poland, and Venezuela. Topics also include climate justice, human rights, women, and more.
    05/23/19NewsPress Releases
  • A Thousand Small Sanities: The Moral Adventure of Liberalism, with Adam Gopnik
    In his eloquent defense of liberalism, Adam Gopnik goes back to its origins and argues that rather than emphasizing the role of the individual, the principles of community and compromise are at the core of the liberal project. Indeed, these are the essential elements of humane, pluralist societies; and in an age of autocracy, our very lives may depend on their continued existence.
    05/22/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Crack-Up: The Amritsar Massacre & India's Independence Movement, with Gyan Prakash
    Princeton's Gyan Prakash tells the tragic story of the Amritsar Massacre in 1919, in which a British general ordered his soldiers to shoot at thousands of unarmed civilians, and its galvanizing effect on the Indian independence movement. Was this violence an "exceptional" moment in Britain's colonial history? And how did it change Gandhi's thinking in relation to his strategies to resist colonialism?
    05/15/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • 100 Years After Versailles
    Just weeks after an armistice halted the most devastating conflict in generations, the victors of the Great War set out to negotiate the terms of the peace--and to rewrite the rules of international relations. A century later, we live in a world shaped by the Treaty of Versailles. In this fascinating discussion, a panel of distinguished historians delve into the complex situation on the ground at the time and the Treaty's legacy today, from Europe and the U.S. to Asia and the Middle East.
    05/14/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Generational Divide?
    As Millennials and "Generation Z" begin to enter the ranks of both American politics as well as the expert community, it is uncertain if they will share the same assumptions about the role of the United States in international affairs, writes Nikolas Gvosdev.
    05/07/19Publications
  • How Change Happens, with Cass Sunstein
    From the French Revolution to the Arab Spring to #MeToo, how does social change happen? In a book that was 25 years in the making, Cass Sunstein unpacks this puzzle by exploring the interplay of three decisive factors. Don't miss this insightful talk. It may change how you view the world.
    04/23/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Human Rights, Liberalism, & Ordinary Virtues, with Michael Ignatieff
    Central European University's President Michael Ignatieff is a human rights scholar, an educator, a former politician, and, as he tells us, the son of a refugee. He discusses what he calls "the ordinary virtues," such as patience and tolerance; the status of human rights today and the dilemmas of migration; the essential critera for true democracy; and the ideal curriculum. His advice to students: Learn to think for yourself.
    04/22/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Crack-Up: Winston Churchill & the Geopolitics of 1919, with Andrew Roberts
    In this episode of the Crack-Up series on 1919, Andrew Roberts, author of "Churchill: Walking with Destiny," examines how Churchill dealt with the complicated problems facing Great Britain at the end of World War I, including how to treat the Germans in defeat, his changing views on Russia--but always in pursuit of British national interests--his stance on a homeland for the Jews, and his determination to hold on to British India.
    04/08/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • From Gutenberg to Google: The History of Our Future, with Tom Wheeler
    We've been through information and technology revolutions before, going back to Gutenberg, says former FCC chairman Tom Wheeler. Now it's our turn to be at a terminus of history and the rules that worked for industrial capitalism are probably no longer adequate for Internet capitalism. So our task is not to flee but to stand up, recognize the challenge, and deal with it.
    04/05/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Romania: NATO's Frail Anchor in a Turbulent Black Sea
    "This week, together with six other former communist bloc countries, Romania marks the 15th anniversary of its NATO accession," writes Theo Stan. "If it succeeds to get its act together the country's pro-U.S. posture and diplomacy may never have weighed more in anchoring Euro-Atlantic stability."
    04/05/19Publications
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Liberal Democracy, Empathy, & AI, with Alexander Görlach
    In this wide-ranging talk, Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Alexander Görlach discusses the importance of empathy in liberal democracies, the shocking Uyghur detention in China, and how AI is affecting all facets of society. What does liberalism look like in 2019? How will technology change democracy and religion?
    03/28/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts

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