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"Kant and the End of War: A Critique of Just War Theory" by Howard Williams; and "Kant and Cosmopolitanism: The Philosophical Ideal of World Citizenship" by Pauline Kleingeld

Ethics & International Affairs, Volume 27.3 (Fall 2013)

September 16, 2013

"Kant and the End of War: A Critique of Just War Theory" by Howard Williams; and "Kant and Cosmopolitanism: The Philosophical Ideal of World Citizenship" by Pauline Kleingeld

Kant and the End of War: A Critique of Just War Theory, Howard Williams (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012), 216 pp., $90 cloth.

Kant and Cosmopolitanism: The Philosophical Ideal of World Citizenship, Pauline Kleingeld (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2012), 215 pp., $90 cloth.

Review by Alyssa Bernstein

Since the last decade of the twentieth century, Immanuel Kant has become central to academic discussions of international relations for various reasons, including the end of the cold war (which renewed many people’s hopes for worldwide peace and democracy) and the publication of writings by the prominent neo-Kantians Jürgen Habermas and John Rawls and their followers and critics, as well as by a number of Kant scholars writing about war, humanitarian intervention, democracy, international law, peace, and cosmopolitanism. Kant and the End of War, by Howard Williams, and Kant and Cosmopolitanism, by Pauline Kleingeld, are new books by two of the foremost contemporary scholars of Kant’s political philosophy, and the theme of international peace is central to both.

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