Table of Contents, Volume 27.1, Spring 2013

February 14, 2013

Ethics and International Affairs Vol 27.1 Spring 2013

Ethics & International Affairs is pleased to announce the publication of its spring 2013 issue. This issue features an essay by Shefa Siegel on the missing ethics of mining; a Carnegie Council centennial special section on "Just War and Its Critics," with contributions by James Turner JohnsonCian O’Driscoll, John Kelsay, and Daniel Brunstetter and Megan Braun; and book reviews by Charli Carpenter and Deen K. Chatterjee.


ESSAY

The Missing Ethics of Mining [Full Text]
Shefa Siegel
There are many mining industries, and each has its own culture, directives, structure, purpose, and pathologies.


SPECIAL SECTION: JUST WAR AND ITS CRITICS

Editor's Note [Full Text]
As we approach our second century, Carnegie Council will remain the home for energetic, rigorous, and creative thinking on the ethics of war. In these pages, we rededicate ourselves to the proposition that the "just war" tradition is an inheritance that requires and rewards constant engagement.

Introduction: Thinking Ethically about the Use of Force [Full Text]
Cian O'Driscoll
What does it mean to think ethically about the use of force? This beguilingly simple question is difficult to address.

Contemporary Just War Thinking: Which Is Worse, to Have Friends or Critics?
James Turner Johnson
The increasingly widespread and energetic engagement with the idea of just war over the last 50 years of thinking on morality and armed conflict—especially in English-speaking countries—presents a striking contrast to the previous several centuries, going back to the early 1600s, in which thinkers addressing moral issues related to war did so without reference to the just war idea.

Divisions within the Ranks? The Just War Tradition and the Use and Abuse of History
Cian O'Driscoll
Have the critics of the historical approach to just war theory landed it a knock-out blow, or can it withstand the bricks and bats that have been hurled its way? This article will elucidate four of the most hard-hitting charges levied at the historical approach, and evaluate its continuing utility in light of them.

Just War Thinking as a Social Practice
John Kelsay
Given the niche occupied by just war thinking in contemporary policy discourse, it is worth asking several basic questions about the just war vocabulary. What purposes does it (or can it) serve? What is the nature of its authority? How does or ought just war thinking proceed? Or, to put it another way, how does one recognize "good" just war thinking?

From Jus ad Bellum to Jus ad Vim: Recalibrating Our Understanding of the Moral Use of Force
Daniel Brunstetter and Megan Braun
Just war scholars often do not differentiate between force and war, but rather talk about bellum justum as if all uses of force implied the same moral challenges. The tendency is therefore to evaluate forces short of war through the lens of jus ad bellum. We question whether this assumption is warranted.


REVIEWS [FULL TEXT]

The Image before the Weapon: A Critical History of the Distinction between Combatant and Civilian by Helen Kinsella
Review by Charli Carpenter
This book traces the concept of the civilian from medieval times through the colonial era and up to its eventual codification only a few decades ago.

Poverty and Morality: Religious and Secular Perspectives, Edited by William A. Galston and Peter H. Hoffenberg
Review by Deen K. Chatterjee
Covering the six major religious traditions and such secular perspectives as classical liberalism, contemporary liberal egalitarianism, Marxism, and feminism, this book offers a valuable collection of articles for understanding the normative dimensions of poverty.


BRIEFLY NOTED

The Revenge of Geography: What the Map Tells Us About Coming Conflicts and the Battle Against Fate by Robert D. Kaplan [Full Text]
Review by The Editors
With a breadth and depth of knowledge spanning not only current geopolitics but centuries of history, Robert Kaplan shows us the crucial importance of geography in shaping our destinies.