Global Ethics Weekly: Disaster Response & Ethics, with Malka Older

Oct 11, 2018

Former Senior Fellow Malka Older, a novelist and aid worker, details the ethical and logistical sides of disaster response, drawing on her experiences in Sri Lanka, Fukushima, and Darfur. Why are "rich" countries sometimes less prepared to handle earthquakes and hurricanes? How is disaster response different in the United States? And with Hurricane Michael affecting millions this week, what are some practical ways to help?

Former Senior Fellow Malka Older, a novelist and aid worker, details the ethical and logistical sides of disaster response, drawing on her experiences in Sri Lanka, Fukushima, and Darfur. Why are "rich" countries sometimes less prepared to handle earthquakes and hurricanes? How is disaster response different in the United States? And with Hurricane Michael affecting millions this week, what are some practical ways to help?

This podcast references Older's 2016 academic article "Securitization of Disaster Response in the United States: The Case of Hurricane Katrina," which was published in the Interdisciplinary Journal of Papers on the Americas. Her most recent novel is State Tectonics, the third book in the Centenal Cycle after Infomocracy and Null States. You can find more from Older on her personal website and her Twitter account @m_older.

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