• Africa, Artificial Intelligence, & Ethics
    04/05/2021
    Artificial intelligence is impacting and will impact Africa as profoundly as any continent on Earth. While some African nations struggle with limited access to the Internet, others are leaping into the digital economy with Smart Cities. Access for all, digital literacy, and capacity-building remain as challenges. How through AI and ethics can prospects for all of Africa be improved?
    04/05/21MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Good American: The Epic Life of Bob Gersony, the U.S. Government's Greatest Humanitarian, with Robert D. Kaplan
    02/10/2021
    In his long career as a journalist covering the Cold War and its aftermath, best-selling author Robert D. Kaplan often crossed paths with Bob Gersony. A high school dropout later awarded a Bronze Star for his service in Vietnam, Gersony conducted on-the-ground research for the U.S. government in virtually every war and natural-disaster zone in the world. In conversation with Carnegie Council President Joel Rosenthal, Kaplan discusses the powerful example that Gersony set of how American diplomacy should be conducted.
    02/10/21MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Doorstep: Opportunities for a New U.S. Policy Toward African Nations, with Ambassador Charles A. Ray
    12/04/2020
    In this week's Doorstep, hosts Tatiana Serafin and Nikolas Gvosdev are joined by Charles A. Ray, current chair of the Foreign Policy Research Institute's Africa Program and former U.S. ambassador to Zimbabwe. They discuss a Biden-Harris reset of U.S. foreign policy and narratives towards the diverse and dynamic nations of Africa, and opportunities for American companies to invest in tech and consumer markets, especially the growing youth populations across the region.
    12/04/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • AI, the Future of Work, & 21st Century Challenges for the Social Contract, with James Manyika
    10/20/2020
    Can artificial intelligence (AI) be deployed in ways that enhance equality, or will these systems exacerbate existing structural inequalities and create new ones? In this webinar McKinsey Global Institute's James Manyika and Carnegie-Uehiro Fellow Wendell Wallach delve into questions concerning the ethical implications of AI, the present and future of work in the United States and Europe, and the evolution of the social contract.
    10/20/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • A Case for Giving Climate Migrants Protected Legal Status
    09/20/2019
    With climate change already affecting vast regions of the planet, Bard College's Brian Mateo makes the case for expanding legal protections for refugees to include people displaced due to environmental issues. Whether by updating the 1951 Convention or working on a new global agreement, Mateo writes that this an urgent human rights issue for vulnerable populations today and future generations.
    09/20/19Publications
  • Ethics & the U.S.-China Trade War, with Nikolas Gvosdev
    08/20/2019
    What role should ethics play in the U.S.-China trade war? Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev looks at these economic tensions in the context of the Uyghur detention and the Hong Kong protests, different theories on integrating China into the world economy, and what it could mean to "lose" in this conflict. Is there a breaking point in terms of China's human rights policies? What's the view in Africa and Europe?
    08/20/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Ill Winds: Saving Democracy from Russian Rage, Chinese Ambition, and American Complacency, with Larry Diamond
    06/20/2019
    Larry Diamond's core argument is stark: the defense and advancement of democratic ideals relies on U.S. global leadership. If the U.S. does not reclaim its traditional place as the keystone of democracy, today's authoritarian trend could become a tsunami that could provide an opening for Vladimir Putin, Xi Jinping, and their admirers to turn the 21st century into a dark time of surging authoritarianism.
    06/20/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • China, Surveillance, and "Belt & Road" with Joshua Eisenman
    06/05/2019
    Just back from China, Sinologist (and fluent Mandarin speaker) Joshua Eisenman discusses the pervasive camera surveillance and facial recognition systems there; the omnipresent power of "the security state;" the effect of the U.S.-China trade war on everyday life and future business; and the expansion of the original Belt and Road project, a term than is now applied to almost any project anywhere in the world.
    06/05/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Carnegie Council Announces Robert J. Myers Fellows for 2019
    05/23/2019
    The Robert J. Myers Fellows Fund supports and promotes activities of the Carnegie Council network that embody Mr. Myers' vision of effective ethical inquiry rooted in local experiences and communities. This year 13 projects were chosen, with a diverse range of issues concerning China, the Czech Republic, Africa, Germany, Indonesia, Japan, Montenegro, Poland, and Venezuela. Topics also include climate justice, human rights, women, and more.
    05/23/19NewsPress Releases
  • Ethical Implications of Climate Change for Education
    04/09/2019
    "Education is often tied with privilege and who has access," writes Brian Mateo, assistant dean of civic engagement at Bard College. "Let us not continue to widen the gap because of physical barriers that are affecting children and underrepresented populations in our fast-changing climate."
    04/09/19Publications
  • The New Rules of War: Victory in the Age of Durable Disorder, with Sean McFate
    03/19/2019
    "Nobody fights conventionally except for us anymore, yet we're sinking a big bulk, perhaps the majority of our defense dollars, into preparing for another conventional war, which is the very definition of insanity," declares national security strategist and former paratrooper Sean McFate. The U.S. needs to recognize that we're living in an age of "durable disorder"--a time of persistent, smoldering conflicts--and the old rules no longer apply.
    03/19/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Democracy in Ghana
    03/12/2019
    "If you think it is fair to give everyone a level playing field; if you think that human dignity and rights must be preserved at all times; if you think that the ordinary man in a country should be the fulcrum around which the governance process revolves, then pack up and come to Ghana, we have a democracy for you."
    03/12/19Publications
  • Jingjing Zhang: Greening China's Globalization
    02/20/2019
    Born in China, environmental lawyer Jingjing Zhang is working to hold China accountable for the negative impacts of its overseas investment and construction projects, the value of which is close to $2 trillion. Known as the "Erin Brockovich of China," she investigates cases from Africa to Latin America to Southeast Asia, to ensure Chinese companies' compliance with environmental laws and international human rights standards.
    02/20/19Publications
  • Global Ethics Weekly: U.S. Defense Policy After Mattis, with Asha Castleberry
    01/09/2019
    National security expert and U.S. Army veteran Asha Castleberry makes sense of a busy and seemingly chaotic time for the Department of Defense in the wake of Secretary Mattis' departure. What should think about Trump's plans in Syria and Afghanistan? How is the U.S. planning to counter China in Africa? And has John Bolton actually been a moderating influence?
    01/09/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • A Savage Order, with Rachel Kleinfeld
    11/09/2018
    Can violent societies get better? Rachel Kleinfeld discusses her latest book, "A Savage Order: How the World's Deadliest Countries Can Forge a Path to Security." Her conclusion is ultimately optimistic: Though it's never easy, real democracy (not autocracy in disguise) and a vibrant middle class can provide a path out of violence.
    11/09/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • China Steps Out, with Joshua Eisenman
    11/02/2018
    In this illuminating conversation, China scholar Joshua Eisenman discusses his two latest books: "Red China's Green Revolution," which overturns the conventional wisdom (both in China and abroad) that Chairman Mao's commune system was a failure; and a co-edited volume "China Steps Out," which explains why for China (unlike the United States), developing regions are a cornerstone of its foreign policy.
    11/02/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Refugees, from Utica to Uganda, with Kavitha Rajagopalan
    09/27/2018
    As the Trump administration cuts refugee resettlement in the U.S. to its lowest number in decades, this population in other nations has exploded in recent years. Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Kavitha Rajagopalan details what this looks like for one refugee in Utica, New York and the challenges that countries like Uganda and Turkey are facing.
    09/27/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Would the World Be Better Without the UN? with Thomas G. Weiss
    06/18/2018
    Thomas Weiss, a leading expert on the history and politics of the United Nations, gives incontrovertible evidence of the UN's achievements, such as the eradication of smallpox, but also details where the organization has fallen short. This is a critical time for all multilateral organizations and treaties, he stresses, as Trump has no regard for international cooperation.
    06/18/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Roadmap to Hell: Sex, Drugs and Guns on the Mafia Coast, with Barbie Latza Nadeau
    05/24/2018
    Rome-based journalist Barbie Latza Nadeau tells the horrifying story of the thousands of Nigerian women and girls duped into being trafficked to Italy, where they are forced to become sex slaves, drug mules, or weapons smugglers. How can this be stopped? The Nigerian government turns a blind eye, Libya, the transit point, is a failed state, and Italy is overwhelmed by the sheer numbers of migrants--plus prostitution is legal there.
    05/24/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Carnegie Council Congratulates Michael Ignatieff on Winning Eighth Annual Zócalo Book Prize for "The Ordinary Virtues"
    05/17/2018
    Michael Ignatieff's latest book, "The Ordinary Virtues: Moral Order in a Divided World," which grew out of his Centennial project for Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs, has won the prestigious Zócalo Book Prize for 2018.
    05/17/18NewsPress Releases

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