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  • Ethical Implications of Climate Change for Education
    04/09/2019
    "Education is often tied with privilege and who has access," writes Brian Mateo, assistant dean of civic engagement at Bard College. "Let us not continue to widen the gap because of physical barriers that are affecting children and underrepresented populations in our fast-changing climate."
    04/09/19Publications
  • The New Rules of War: Victory in the Age of Durable Disorder, with Sean McFate
    03/19/2019
    "Nobody fights conventionally except for us anymore, yet we're sinking a big bulk, perhaps the majority of our defense dollars, into preparing for another conventional war, which is the very definition of insanity," declares national security strategist and former paratrooper Sean McFate. The U.S. needs to recognize that we're living in an age of "durable disorder"--a time of persistent, smoldering conflicts--and the old rules no longer apply.
    03/19/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Democracy in Ghana
    03/12/2019
    "If you think it is fair to give everyone a level playing field; if you think that human dignity and rights must be preserved at all times; if you think that the ordinary man in a country should be the fulcrum around which the governance process revolves, then pack up and come to Ghana, we have a democracy for you."
    03/12/19Publications
  • Jingjing Zhang: Greening China's Globalization
    02/20/2019
    Born in China, environmental lawyer Jingjing Zhang is working to hold China accountable for the negative impacts of its overseas investment and construction projects, the value of which is close to $2 trillion. Known as the "Erin Brockovich of China," she investigates cases from Africa to Latin America to Southeast Asia, to ensure Chinese companies' compliance with environmental laws and international human rights standards.
    02/20/19Publications
  • Global Ethics Weekly: U.S. Defense Policy After Mattis, with Asha Castleberry
    01/09/2019
    National security expert and U.S. Army veteran Asha Castleberry makes sense of a busy and seemingly chaotic time for the Department of Defense in the wake of Secretary Mattis' departure. What should think about Trump's plans in Syria and Afghanistan? How is the U.S. planning to counter China in Africa? And has John Bolton actually been a moderating influence?
    01/09/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • A Savage Order, with Rachel Kleinfeld
    11/09/2018
    Can violent societies get better? Rachel Kleinfeld discusses her latest book, "A Savage Order: How the World's Deadliest Countries Can Forge a Path to Security." Her conclusion is ultimately optimistic: Though it's never easy, real democracy (not autocracy in disguise) and a vibrant middle class can provide a path out of violence.
    11/09/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • China Steps Out, with Joshua Eisenman
    11/02/2018
    In this illuminating conversation, China scholar Joshua Eisenman discusses his two latest books: "Red China's Green Revolution," which overturns the conventional wisdom (both in China and abroad) that Chairman Mao's commune system was a failure; and a co-edited volume "China Steps Out," which explains why for China (unlike the United States), developing regions are a cornerstone of its foreign policy.
    11/02/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Refugees, from Utica to Uganda, with Kavitha Rajagopalan
    09/27/2018
    As the Trump administration cuts refugee resettlement in the U.S. to its lowest number in decades, this population in other nations has exploded in recent years. Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Kavitha Rajagopalan details what this looks like for one refugee in Utica, New York and the challenges that countries like Uganda and Turkey are facing.
    09/27/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Would the World Be Better Without the UN? with Thomas G. Weiss
    06/18/2018
    Thomas Weiss, a leading expert on the history and politics of the United Nations, gives incontrovertible evidence of the UN's achievements, such as the eradication of smallpox, but also details where the organization has fallen short. This is a critical time for all multilateral organizations and treaties, he stresses, as Trump has no regard for international cooperation.
    06/18/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Roadmap to Hell: Sex, Drugs and Guns on the Mafia Coast, with Barbie Latza Nadeau
    05/24/2018
    Rome-based journalist Barbie Latza Nadeau tells the horrifying story of the thousands of Nigerian women and girls duped into being trafficked to Italy, where they are forced to become sex slaves, drug mules, or weapons smugglers. How can this be stopped? The Nigerian government turns a blind eye, Libya, the transit point, is a failed state, and Italy is overwhelmed by the sheer numbers of migrants--plus prostitution is legal there.
    05/24/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Carnegie Council Congratulates Michael Ignatieff on Winning Eighth Annual Zócalo Book Prize for "The Ordinary Virtues"
    05/17/2018
    Michael Ignatieff's latest book, "The Ordinary Virtues: Moral Order in a Divided World," which grew out of his Centennial project for Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs, has won the prestigious Zócalo Book Prize for 2018.
    05/17/18NewsPress Releases
  • Crime and Global Justice: The Dynamics of International Punishment, with Daniele Archibugi
    05/07/2018
    Are we witnessing a new era of cosmopolitan justice or are the old principles of victors' justice still in play? Economic and political theorist Daniele Archibugi discusses his new book, "Crime and Global Justice," which examines the history of global criminal justice and presents five case studies: Augusto Pinochet, Slobodan Milošević, Radovan Karadžić, Saddam Hussein, and Omar al-Basheer.
    05/07/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Promoting Human Rights in the Developing World, with American Jewish World Service's Robert Bank
    05/02/2018
    Growing up in Apartheid-era South Africa, Robert Bank cared about social injustice from an early age. Today he travels the world for AJWS, working with local activists on a range of issues such as women's rights in India and LGBT rights in Uganda. "My job—very much like a conductor of an orchestra in some way—is to ensure that every instrument has its beautiful voice heard and that this melody is given the opportunity to really soar."
    05/02/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Peacemakers: Leadership Lessons from Twentieth-Century Statesmanship, with Bruce Jentleson
    05/01/2018
    What are the qualities and conditions that enable people to become successful peacemakers? At a time when peace seems elusive and conflict endemic, Bruce Jentleson makes a forceful and inspiring case for the continued relevance of statesmanship and diplomacy and provides practical guidance to 21st-century leaders seeking lessons from some of history's most accomplished negotiators, activists, and trailblazers.
    05/01/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Return of Marco Polo's World, with Robert D. Kaplan
    03/16/2018
    If you wish to understand the depth and breadth of the geographical, historical, technological, and political forces that are shaping our world, there is no better guide than Robert Kaplan. Using Marco Polo's journey as "a geographical framing device for Eurasia today," he examines China's ambitious One Belt One Road project, dissecting China's imperial dream and its multiple, under-reported objectives.
    03/16/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Maintaining Power by Breaking up Society: Eritrea Under Isaias Afwerki
    03/12/2018
    Isaias Afwerki has been president of Eritrea since 1993. How has he stayed in power so long, although he is highly unpopular across Eritrea, even in his home region? "Instead of rallying public support, Isaias employs coercion, imprisonment, torture, intimidation, and killing to secure obedience, while simultaneously pursuing divide-and-rule strategies," writes Bahlbi Malk.
    03/12/18Publications
  • "Modern Slavery" with Siddharth Kara
    01/30/2018
    In his third book on slavery, which took 16 years of research, Siddharth Kara calculates that there are roughly 31 million slaves worldwide, at least half of them in South Asia. We need to apply much more resources and compassion to end "this horrible indignity."
    01/30/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Deciphering the Middle East and Trump's National Security Stategy, with Asha Castleberry
    01/10/2018
    Asha Castleberry, Fordham professor and U.S. Army veteran, describes her "mixed reaction" to Trump's National Security Strategy--touching on China and Russia, cybersecurity, and climate change--and what effect it will actually have on the military's operations. Plus, she details an increasingly complicated Middle East, with the Saudi crown prince on a warpath and a dangerous transitional period in Syria and Iraq after major victories against ISIS.
    01/10/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • A Climate of Impunity? The Problem of Sexual Abuse by UN Peacekeeping Forces, with Justice Marie Deschamps
    01/09/2018
    Over two years after the release of a report on sexual exploitation and abuse by international peacekeeping forces in the Central African Republic, chaired by Marie Deschamps, has anything changed? Not much, says Deschamps in this shocking interview. The report's recommendations have not been implemented and there is still a "climate of impunity" for abusers, even though the first allegations against UN forces date back to the 1980s.
    01/09/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Humanitarian Ethics and the Red Cross, with Hugo Slim
    12/15/2017
    "I would say that the principle of humanity, and humanity in war even, is a global ethic. We can trace it through human history," says ICRC's Hugo Slim. Don't miss this in-depth discussion about the work of the Red Cross and its core humanitarian ethics as laid out in the Geneva Convention: humanity and compassion; the principal of a clear distinction between combatants and noncombatants; and proportionality in the weapons and the force used.
    12/15/17MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts

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