• Speech Police: The Global Struggle to Govern the Internet, with David Kaye
    06/13/2019
    The original idea of the Internet was for it to be a "free speech nirvana," but in 2019, the reality is quite different. Authoritarians spread disinformation and extremists incite hatred, often on the huge, U.S.-based platforms, YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter. David Kaye, UN special rapporteur on freedom of opinion & expression, details the different approaches to these issues in Europe and the United States and looks for solutions in this informed and important talk.
    06/13/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: A Firsthand Account of Electrification in Myanmar, with Christina Madden
    06/06/2019
    Christina Madden, now a director at Criterion Institute, discusses her work on Myanmar's massive electrification project in 2013-2014. With less than one-third of the population connected to the grid after a decades-long military dictatorship, what were the complications in getting millions in Myanmar connected? What were the political and cross-border issues, specifically when it came to cooperating with China?
    06/06/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Carnegie Council Announces Robert J. Myers Fellows for 2019
    05/23/2019
    The Robert J. Myers Fellows Fund supports and promotes activities of the Carnegie Council network that embody Mr. Myers' vision of effective ethical inquiry rooted in local experiences and communities. This year 13 projects were chosen, with a diverse range of issues concerning China, the Czech Republic, Africa, Germany, Indonesia, Japan, Montenegro, Poland, and Venezuela. Topics also include climate justice, human rights, women, and more.
    05/23/19NewsPress Releases
  • Religion & Politics in Southeast Asia, with Nava Nuraniyah
    05/20/2019
    Nava Nuraniyah, an analyst at the Institute for Policy Analysis of Conflict (IPAC) in Jakarta, Indonesia, speaks with Senior Fellow Devin Stewart about the recent general election in Indonesia, social media and religious extremism in Southeast Asia, and the future direction of the region's politics.
    05/20/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Indonesia's General Election, with Marcus Mietzner
    05/10/2019
    Marcus Mietzner of Australian National University speaks with Senior Fellow Devin Stewart about the results of the general election last month in Indonesia, one that has been called "the most complicated single-day ballots in global history." Mietzner explains the various forces shaping Indonesian politics today and in the future, including demographics, Islam, identity, and societal polarization.
    05/10/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Ethics and Climate Change: Earth Day 2019
    04/21/2019
    In honor of Earth Day, April 22, 2019, Carnegie Council presents a selection of materials from the past year on the ethical responsibilities and challenges of coping with climate change.
    04/21/19PublicationsResource Picks
  • Global Ethics Weekly: A Firsthand Account of the Khmer Rouge Trials, with Andrew Boyle
    04/17/2019
    On the 44th anniversary of the Khmer Rouge entering Phnom Penh, the Brennan Center's Andrew Boyle discusses his work helping to prosecute the perpetrators the of genocide and other crimes against humanity in 1970s Cambodia. Boyle details the cases, the defendants, and the controversies surrounding the tribunal. Why did justice take so long? How did Cambodians react to the trials? And why is this genocide conviction so significant?
    04/17/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Ethical Implications of Climate Change for Education
    04/09/2019
    "Education is often tied with privilege and who has access," writes Brian Mateo, assistant dean of civic engagement at Bard College. "Let us not continue to widen the gap because of physical barriers that are affecting children and underrepresented populations in our fast-changing climate."
    04/09/19Publications
  • China's Influence on Democracies in Asia, with Joshua Kurlantzick
    04/04/2019
    As part of Carnegie Council's Information Warfare podcast series, Devin Stewart interviews Joshua Kurlantzick about his recent project on Chinese media and influence campaigns and techniques in East Asia. Kurlantzick connects his project, which will become a book, to his previous books "Charm Offensive" and "Democracy in Retreat." He concludes by assessing China's overall impact on Asian politics and the fate of democracy worldwide.
    04/04/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Liberal Democracy, Empathy, & AI, with Alexander Görlach
    03/28/2019
    In this wide-ranging talk, Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Alexander Görlach discusses the importance of empathy in liberal democracies, the shocking Uyghur detention in China, and how AI is affecting all facets of society. What does liberalism look like in 2019? How will technology change democracy and religion?
    03/28/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Future is Asian, with Parag Khanna
    02/12/2019
    "The rise of China is not the biggest story in the world," says Parag Khanna. "The Asianization of Asia, the return of Asia, the rise of the Asian system, is the biggest story in the world." This new Asian system, where business, technology, globalization, and geopolitics are intertwined, stretches from Japan to Saudi Arabia, from Australia to Russia, and Indonesia to Turkey, linking 5 billion people.
    02/12/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Securitizing Climate Change in the Philippines, with Mark Payumo
    01/10/2019
    Now based in California, Mark Payumo previously served as a Philippine Army Special Forces officer. Reflecting on his recent Carnegie Council site visit to Manila to investigate climate change and the role of the defense establishment, he concludes that securitizing climate change--i.e. having the military involved, both in adaptation and mitigation--is a decided advantage for the community.
    01/10/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Jailing of Journalists Worldwide, with CPJ's Elana Beiser
    12/19/2018
    Elana Beiser of the Committee to Protect Journalists discusses the latest CPJ report, which finds that for the third year in a row, 251 or more journalists are jailed around the world, suggesting the authoritarian approach to critical news coverage is more than a temporary spike. Also for the third year running, Turkey, China, and Egypt were responsible for about half of those imprisoned, with Turkey remaining the world's worst jailer.
    12/19/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Most Popular Carnegie Council Resources, 2018
    12/18/2018
    Carnegie Council presents its most popular resources created in 2018. Topics include solutions to inequality, Russian influence in France, democracy in danger, the situation in Burma/Myanmar, artificial intelligence, and much more.
    12/18/18NewsPress Releases
  • Climate Disaster Response in the Philippines, with Austin McKinney and Chetan Peddada
    12/18/2018
    Pacific Delegates Austin McKinney and Chetan Pedada both have military backgrounds and technology expertise. They discuss ways in which machine-learning and military cooperation could help the Philippines cope with climate change and natural disasters and also reflect on the human impact that climate change is already having on these islands and how Filipinos are working together to respond.
    12/18/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Resources Resulting from Carnegie Council Climate Change Research Delegation to the Philippines, October 2018
    12/17/2018
    In October 2018, Carnegie Council's Asia Dialogues program led a fact-finding trip to Manila to investigate the effects of climate change on the Philippines. How is the encroaching threat of climate change reshaping culture, politics, and even faith? How can the claim of economic prosperity be reconciled with the equally valid claim of sustainability and conservation?
    12/17/18Publications
  • Climate Change in South & Southeast Asia, with Yoko Okura
    12/17/2018
    Yoko Okura of Mercy Corps discusses her recent visit to Cox's Bazar in Bangladesh, the site of a camp for 1 million Rohingya refugees. She learned every day, that 700 tons of trees--four football fields--are being cut down for firewood and construction, bringing an increased risk of landslides and floods. She also reflects on her visit to Manila with Carnegie Council and the advantages of traveling with a group from different disciplines.
    12/17/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • It's Time for the U.S. and Chinese Militaries to Cooperate on HADR
    12/06/2018
    Relations between the U.S. and China are at their lowest point in decades. Joint Humanitarian and Disaster Response (HADR) would provide an effective mechanism to improve military-to-military engagement between the U.S. and China. The Philippines offers an attractive partner for the U.S. and China to build and operate under a joint-HADR framework for military cooperation.
    12/06/18Publications
  • Machine-Learning, Climate Change, and Disaster Management in the Philippines
    11/27/2018
    Machine-learning can provide relevant information at the right moment to climate change disaster survivors in the Philippines.
    11/27/18Publications
  • Myanmar and the Plight of the Rohingya, with Elliott Prasse-Freeman
    11/16/2018
    The Rohingya are seen as fundamentally 'other,' says Prasse-Freeman. "Hence, even if they have formal citizenship, they wouldn't really be accepted as citizens, as full members of the polity." Could Aung San Suu Kyi have done more to prevent the persecution? How important was the hate speech on Facebook? How can the situation be resolved? Don't miss this informative and troubling conversation.
    11/16/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts

Load More