• Global Ethics Review: The Model International Mobility Convention 2.0, with Michael Doyle
    04/27/2021
    How can we make migration more ethical? Columbia University's Professor Michael Doyle, also a senior fellow at Carnegie Council, discusses the Model International Mobility Convention (MIMC), which is focused on creating "a better set of rules for the movement of people across borders." Doyle and host Alex Woodson also touch on the Biden administration and the situation at the U.S.-Mexico border and how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected migration across the world. 
    04/27/21MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • ICGAI: Meaningful Inclusivity in Governing the AI Revolution
    04/19/2021
    Don't miss Session 2 of the International Congress for the Governance of Artificial Intelligence (ICGAI) online speaker series! This event focused on "Meaningful Inclusivity in Governing the AI Revolution." The session includes insights from high-level experts and decision-makers on the key stakeholders in achieving effective AI governance, the necessity of meaningful inclusivity, and how we can stimulate cooperation as we navigate the challenges posed by emerging technologies.
    04/19/21MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Doorstep: Assessing Trump's Legacy on Biden's Foreign Policy, with George Mason's Colin Dueck
    03/26/2021
    The Biden-Harris administration made a host of foreign policy promises for their first 100 days in office. Leading the list was linking foreign and domestic policy concerns. George Mason University's Colin Dueck joins "Doorstep" co-hosts Nick Gvosdev and Tatiana Serafin to review what has and has not happened in the first two months of the new administration. On which issues can Republicans and Democrats agree? Which will continue to create divisions? 
    03/26/21MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Carnegie New Leaders Podcast: Geopolitical Developments in Latin America, with Paul J. Angelo
    03/24/2021
    Dr. Paul J. Angelo is a fellow for Latin America Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR). His work focuses on U.S.-Latin American relations, transnational crime, violent actors, military and police reform, and immigration. A former active-duty naval officer, Angelo has extensive experience in military and government service. Carnegie New Leader Thomas Herrera joins him to discuss the current state of affairs in U.S.-Latin American relations, whether or not the Biden administration can fill the leadership vacuum, and possible post-pandemic scenarios.
    03/24/21MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Good American: The Epic Life of Bob Gersony, the U.S. Government's Greatest Humanitarian, with Robert D. Kaplan
    02/10/2021
    In his long career as a journalist covering the Cold War and its aftermath, best-selling author Robert D. Kaplan often crossed paths with Bob Gersony. A high school dropout later awarded a Bronze Star for his service in Vietnam, Gersony conducted on-the-ground research for the U.S. government in virtually every war and natural-disaster zone in the world. In conversation with Carnegie Council President Joel Rosenthal, Kaplan discusses the powerful example that Gersony set of how American diplomacy should be conducted.
    02/10/21MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Doorstep: The U.S. & Latin America under Joe Biden with the Wilson Center's Cynthia Arnson
    11/20/2020
    What will a Biden administration mean for Latin America? In this week's "Doorstep," hosts Tatiana Serafin and Nikolas Gvosdev are joined by the Wilson Center's Cynthia Arnson to speak about how events unfolding in Latin American will affect U.S. demographics and politics in 2021 and beyond. With climate change as a centerpiece of his foreign policy agenda, how will Biden approach Brazil? How will his polices differ from Trump when it comes to Venezuela, Cuba, and Central America? How are youth movements in Latin America influencing and inspiring protests happening across the U.S.?
    11/20/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Foreign Policy Narratives in Palm Beach
    01/23/2020
    After an invitation to speak at a gathering of the Palm Beach chapter of the United Nations Association of the United States, U.S. Global Engagement Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev reflects on the current scope and direction of U.S. foreign policy. How will new uncertainties in the international system influence the relationships among the democratic community of nations?
    01/23/20Publications
  • Migration in the Americas, Empathy, & Politics, with Daniela Segovia
    10/29/2019
    Political scientist Daniela Segovia, currently an Eisenhower Fellow, discusses the importance of empathy when working on and thinking about migration policy in Latin America. She also touches on her own story as a Venezuelan migrant living in Mexico. What should governments and international organizations be doing? How can concerned citizens help?
    10/29/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • A Case for Giving Climate Migrants Protected Legal Status
    09/20/2019
    With climate change already affecting vast regions of the planet, Bard College's Brian Mateo makes the case for expanding legal protections for refugees to include people displaced due to environmental issues. Whether by updating the 1951 Convention or working on a new global agreement, Mateo writes that this an urgent human rights issue for vulnerable populations today and future generations.
    09/20/19Publications
  • The Model International Mobility Convention, with Michael Doyle
    09/04/2019
    In this timely talk, SIPA's Professor Michael Doyle details the Model International Mobility Convention, a "hypothetical ideal convention" developed to define a "comprehensive and coherent" set of regulations for the movement of people across borders. Why was it so important to account for tourists alongside refugees and migrant workers? How does this document represent a "realistic utopia"?
    09/04/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The DEA in Honduras: Targeting Corruption in High Places
    06/12/2019
    In Honduras, activists like Edwin Espinal are among the latest victims of a government whose level of corruption has made it incompatible with democratic development. A number of efforts are being made to combat this corruption, however, among them, surprisingly, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). DEA efforts in this regard began in 2012, a year that turned out to be a spectacular failure for the DEA.
    06/12/19Publications
  • Carnegie Council Announces Robert J. Myers Fellows for 2019
    05/23/2019
    The Robert J. Myers Fellows Fund supports and promotes activities of the Carnegie Council network that embody Mr. Myers' vision of effective ethical inquiry rooted in local experiences and communities. This year 13 projects were chosen, with a diverse range of issues concerning China, the Czech Republic, Africa, Germany, Indonesia, Japan, Montenegro, Poland, and Venezuela. Topics also include climate justice, human rights, women, and more.
    05/23/19NewsPress Releases
  • Back to Spheres of Influence?
    05/03/2019
    National Security Adviser John Bolton's recent comments on Russia's interest in Venezuela bring back a concept prevalent in much earlier version of international affairs: spheres of influence. Was this a slip of the tongue or it could it set a precedent for other realms of U.S. foreign policy?
    05/03/19Publications
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Venezuelan Refugees & Immigration Policies, with Kavitha Rajagopalan
    04/02/2019
    With millions of Venezuelans fleeing the Maduro regime, what are the effects on Latin America and the Caribbean? What could or should the United States do? Is it helpful to compare this situation to the Syrian refugee crisis? Senior Fellow Kavitha Rajagopalan discusses immigration policies and asylum law in the context of Venezuela's economic collapse.
    04/02/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The New Rules of War: Victory in the Age of Durable Disorder, with Sean McFate
    03/19/2019
    "Nobody fights conventionally except for us anymore, yet we're sinking a big bulk, perhaps the majority of our defense dollars, into preparing for another conventional war, which is the very definition of insanity," declares national security strategist and former paratrooper Sean McFate. The U.S. needs to recognize that we're living in an age of "durable disorder"--a time of persistent, smoldering conflicts--and the old rules no longer apply.
    03/19/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Democracy is What We Choose and Uphold
    03/12/2019
    "Looking at both the United States and Colombia, with their different foundations and distinct problems, it seems that these political issues seem to take off regardless of the presence of democracy. Democracy doesn't immediately mean that there will be any safeguards against the problems our societies face."
    03/12/19Publications
  • The "Dirty War" and the History of Democracy in Argentina
    03/12/2019
    "Traveling from the United States for the first time at age 17, I thought I knew the definition of democracy: a system in which the representatives are chosen by the people and for the people—simple enough. In Argentina, I quickly learned that democracy was something much more fragile, emotional, and austere than I ever realized."
    03/12/19Publications
  • The Enduring False Promise of Preventive War, with Scott A. Silverstone
    02/26/2019
    Does preventive war really work? "In the vast majority of cases historically, what we see is the country that thought it was saving itself from a greater danger in the future actually creates this greater danger because you generate a level of hostility, a deepening rivalry, and a desire for revenge that comes back to haunt them," says Scott Silverstone. His advice: Hesitate. Before taking action, think through this "preventive war paradox."
    02/26/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Jingjing Zhang: Greening China's Globalization
    02/20/2019
    Born in China, environmental lawyer Jingjing Zhang is working to hold China accountable for the negative impacts of its overseas investment and construction projects, the value of which is close to $2 trillion. Known as the "Erin Brockovich of China," she investigates cases from Africa to Latin America to Southeast Asia, to ensure Chinese companies' compliance with environmental laws and international human rights standards.
    02/20/19Publications
  • Internet Trolls in the U.S. and Mexico, with Saiph Savage
    11/14/2018
    Professor Saiph Savage is an activist scholar and technology expert who is using large-scale data to study the sophisticated ways in which trolls target certain groups and bombard them with misinformation--for example U.S. Latinos were targeted in the 2018 midterm elections as were Mexicans in their 2018 presidential election. But her message is one of hope. In Mexico, citizens eventually saw through misinformation campaigns and others can too.
    11/14/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts

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