• Migration in the Americas, Empathy, & Politics, with Daniela Segovia
    10/29/2019
    Political scientist Daniela Segovia, currently an Eisenhower Fellow, discusses the importance of empathy when working on and thinking about migration policy in Latin America. She also touches on her own story as a Venezuelan migrant living in Mexico. What should governments and international organizations be doing? How can concerned citizens help?
    10/29/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • A Case for Giving Climate Migrants Protected Legal Status
    09/20/2019
    With climate change already affecting vast regions of the planet, Bard College's Brian Mateo makes the case for expanding legal protections for refugees to include people displaced due to environmental issues. Whether by updating the 1951 Convention or working on a new global agreement, Mateo writes that this an urgent human rights issue for vulnerable populations today and future generations.
    09/20/19Publications
  • The Model International Mobility Convention, with Michael Doyle
    09/04/2019
    In this timely talk, SIPA's Professor Michael Doyle details the Model International Mobility Convention, a "hypothetical ideal convention" developed to define a "comprehensive and coherent" set of regulations for the movement of people across borders. Why was it so important to account for tourists alongside refugees and migrant workers? How does this document represent a "realistic utopia"?
    09/04/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The DEA in Honduras: Targeting Corruption in High Places
    06/12/2019
    In Honduras, activists like Edwin Espinal are among the latest victims of a government whose level of corruption has made it incompatible with democratic development. A number of efforts are being made to combat this corruption, however, among them, surprisingly, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). DEA efforts in this regard began in 2012, a year that turned out to be a spectacular failure for the DEA.
    06/12/19Publications
  • Carnegie Council Announces Robert J. Myers Fellows for 2019
    05/23/2019
    The Robert J. Myers Fellows Fund supports and promotes activities of the Carnegie Council network that embody Mr. Myers' vision of effective ethical inquiry rooted in local experiences and communities. This year 13 projects were chosen, with a diverse range of issues concerning China, the Czech Republic, Africa, Germany, Indonesia, Japan, Montenegro, Poland, and Venezuela. Topics also include climate justice, human rights, women, and more.
    05/23/19NewsPress Releases
  • Back to Spheres of Influence?
    05/03/2019
    National Security Adviser John Bolton's recent comments on Russia's interest in Venezuela bring back a concept prevalent in much earlier version of international affairs: spheres of influence. Was this a slip of the tongue or it could it set a precedent for other realms of U.S. foreign policy?
    05/03/19Publications
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Venezuelan Refugees & Immigration Policies, with Kavitha Rajagopalan
    04/02/2019
    With millions of Venezuelans fleeing the Maduro regime, what are the effects on Latin America and the Caribbean? What could or should the United States do? Is it helpful to compare this situation to the Syrian refugee crisis? Senior Fellow Kavitha Rajagopalan discusses immigration policies and asylum law in the context of Venezuela's economic collapse.
    04/02/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The New Rules of War: Victory in the Age of Durable Disorder, with Sean McFate
    03/19/2019
    "Nobody fights conventionally except for us anymore, yet we're sinking a big bulk, perhaps the majority of our defense dollars, into preparing for another conventional war, which is the very definition of insanity," declares national security strategist and former paratrooper Sean McFate. The U.S. needs to recognize that we're living in an age of "durable disorder"--a time of persistent, smoldering conflicts--and the old rules no longer apply.
    03/19/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Democracy is What We Choose and Uphold
    03/12/2019
    "Looking at both the United States and Colombia, with their different foundations and distinct problems, it seems that these political issues seem to take off regardless of the presence of democracy. Democracy doesn't immediately mean that there will be any safeguards against the problems our societies face."
    03/12/19Publications
  • The "Dirty War" and the History of Democracy in Argentina
    03/12/2019
    "Traveling from the United States for the first time at age 17, I thought I knew the definition of democracy: a system in which the representatives are chosen by the people and for the people—simple enough. In Argentina, I quickly learned that democracy was something much more fragile, emotional, and austere than I ever realized."
    03/12/19Publications
  • The Enduring False Promise of Preventive War, with Scott A. Silverstone
    02/26/2019
    Does preventive war really work? "In the vast majority of cases historically, what we see is the country that thought it was saving itself from a greater danger in the future actually creates this greater danger because you generate a level of hostility, a deepening rivalry, and a desire for revenge that comes back to haunt them," says Scott Silverstone. His advice: Hesitate. Before taking action, think through this "preventive war paradox."
    02/26/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Jingjing Zhang: Greening China's Globalization
    02/20/2019
    Born in China, environmental lawyer Jingjing Zhang is working to hold China accountable for the negative impacts of its overseas investment and construction projects, the value of which is close to $2 trillion. Known as the "Erin Brockovich of China," she investigates cases from Africa to Latin America to Southeast Asia, to ensure Chinese companies' compliance with environmental laws and international human rights standards.
    02/20/19Publications
  • Internet Trolls in the U.S. and Mexico, with Saiph Savage
    11/14/2018
    Professor Saiph Savage is an activist scholar and technology expert who is using large-scale data to study the sophisticated ways in which trolls target certain groups and bombard them with misinformation--for example U.S. Latinos were targeted in the 2018 midterm elections as were Mexicans in their 2018 presidential election. But her message is one of hope. In Mexico, citizens eventually saw through misinformation campaigns and others can too.
    11/14/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • A Savage Order, with Rachel Kleinfeld
    11/09/2018
    Can violent societies get better? Rachel Kleinfeld discusses her latest book, "A Savage Order: How the World's Deadliest Countries Can Forge a Path to Security." Her conclusion is ultimately optimistic: Though it's never easy, real democracy (not autocracy in disguise) and a vibrant middle class can provide a path out of violence.
    11/09/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • "The Living Legacy of the First World War": Carnegie Council Marks the 100th Anniversary of Armistice Day
    11/09/2018
    On the 100th anniversary of the armistice, Carnegie Council's "The Living Legacy of the First World War" project joins other centennial initiatives that help rising generations to understand the weight and gravity of this moment in global history and the War's lasting imprint on the present.
    11/09/18NewsPress Releases
  • Education for Peace: The Living Legacy of the First World War
    11/07/2018
    Four Fellows from Carnegie Council's "The Living Legacy of WWI" project present their research on different aspects of the war--counterterrorism, airpower, chemical warfare, and Latin America--and its long-term impacts. The panel was part of the Carnegie Peacebuilding Conversations, a three-day program at the Peace Palace in The Hague, Netherlands, presented in cooperation with Carnegie institutions worldwide and other partners.
    11/07/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • China Steps Out, with Joshua Eisenman
    11/02/2018
    In this illuminating conversation, China scholar Joshua Eisenman discusses his two latest books: "Red China's Green Revolution," which overturns the conventional wisdom (both in China and abroad) that Chairman Mao's commune system was a failure; and a co-edited volume "China Steps Out," which explains why for China (unlike the United States), developing regions are a cornerstone of its foreign policy.
    11/02/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Ethics in Action for Global Ethics Day 2018: 140+ Activities in 50+ Countries
    10/29/2018
    Founded by Carnegie Council in 2014 and held every October, Global Ethics Day provides an opportunity for everyone around the world to explore the crucial role of ethics in their professions and their daily lives. October 17, 2018 marked the fifth annual Global Ethics Day; it was the biggest year yet. Thanks to all who took part.
    10/29/18NewsPress Releases
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Disaster Response & Ethics, with Malka Older
    10/11/2018
    Former Senior Fellow Malka Older, a novelist and aid worker, details the ethical and logistical sides of disaster response, drawing on her experiences in Sri Lanka, Fukushima, and Darfur. Why are "rich" countries sometimes less prepared to handle earthquakes and hurricanes? How is disaster response different in the United States? And with Hurricane Michael affecting millions this week, what are some practical ways to help?
    10/11/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Identity in Colombia, with José Alejandro Cepeda
    09/10/2018
    Colombia's civil war lasted from the 1960s to 2016. How has this terrible experience shaped the Colombian identity and how long will it take before the nation truly recovers? In terms of the region as a whole, what role does European heritage in forming Latin American identities? In this fascinating conversation, Colombian journalist and political scientist José Alejandro Cepeda tackles all these issues and more.
    09/10/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts

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