• Fighting ISIS Online, with Asha Castleberry-Hernandez
    11/08/2019
    National security expert Asha Castleberry-Hernandez discusses what "ISIS 2.0" means and how the terrorist group has used social media to recruit and spread its message. How has its strategy changed since the death of its leader Abur Bakr al-Baghdadi? What can the U.S. military, Congress, and executive branch do better to fight the group online?
    11/08/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Carnegie New Leaders Podcast: The Future of Space Acquisition & Threats, with Maj. Gen. Nina M. Armagno
    11/06/2019
    In conversation with intelligence analyst Amelia M. Wolf, Major General Nina M. Armagno of the U.S. Air Force discusses her role as director of Space Programs in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Acquisition at the Department of Defense. How has space acquisition shifted as threats have evolved? What would a future U.S. Space Force look like?
    11/06/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Struggle for Recognition in International Relations, with Michelle Murray
    10/17/2019
    How can established powers manage the peaceful rise of new great powers? Bard's Michelle Murray offers a new answer to this perennial question, arguing that power transitions are principally social phenomena whereby rising powers struggle to obtain recognition as world powers. How can this framework help us to understand the economic and military rivalry between United States and China?
    10/17/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Making AI Work, Ethically & Responsibly, with Heather M. Roff
    10/07/2019
    Heather M. Roff, senior research analyst at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab, thinks some researchers are having the wrong conversations about AI. Instead of wondering whether AI will ever be a moral agent, we should be focused on how to program the technology to be "morally safe, right, correct, justifiable." What are some practical uses for AI today? How can it be used responsibly in the military realm?
    10/07/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The End of the U.S.-Taliban Talks? with Jonathan Cristol
    09/18/2019
    Despite progress over the last year, Donald Trump effectively ended the latest round of U.S.-Taliban negotiations with a tweet earlier this month. Will talks continue in a more understated way? Does this change anything on the ground in Afghanistan? And what is the Taliban doing in Moscow? Jonathan Cristol, author of "The United States and the Taliban before and after 9/11," discusses all this and more.
    09/18/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Ethics & International Affairs Volume 33.3 (Fall 2019)
    09/10/2019
    The highlight of the Fall 2019 issue of "Ethics & International Affairs" is a roundtable on "Economic Sanctions and Their Consequences." Other topics include human rights and conflict resolution, Afghan attitudes toward civilian wartime harm, the role of supererogation on the battlefield, and the ethics of not-so-civil resistance.
    09/10/19Publications
  • Just Out: "Ethics & International Affairs" Fall 2019 Issue
    09/10/2019
    The highlight of the Fall 2019 issue of "Ethics & International Affairs" is a roundtable on "Economic Sanctions and Their Consequences." Other topics include human rights and conflict resolution, Afghan attitudes toward civilian wartime harm, the role of supererogation on the battlefield, and the ethics of not-so-civil resistance.
    09/10/19NewsPress Releases
  • Back to School with Carnegie Council's New High School Resources
    08/30/2019
    With the new school year in mind, Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs has added timely new high school materials to its extensive online education section. Carnegie Council created high school level world and U.S. history resources based on opinion pieces from "The New York Times" "1919: The Year of the Crack Up" series and Carnegie Council senior fellow Ted Widmer's accompanying podcast.
    08/30/19NewsPress Releases
  • A New Era of Cyberwarfare, with Arun Vishwanath
    07/23/2019
    When the United States launched a massive cyberattack against Iran last month, it heralded "a new age of Internet warfare," says cybersecurity expert Arun Vishwanath. How could cyber-based conflicts change the nature of the Internet? Why is the U.S. especially vulnerable to these threats? And what would a "digital Geneva Convention" look like?
    07/23/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: U.S.-Russian Relations, Ukraine, & the G-20, with Nikolas Gvosdev
    06/11/2019
    Following up on his talk with RAND analyst Ali Wyne on great-power competition, Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev gives an update on U.S.-Russian relations, touching on the war in Eastern Ukraine, the crisis in Venezuela, and election interference. He also previews the upcoming G-20 Summit in Japan, with Trump possibly hampered by his domestic controversies and talk of impeachment.
    06/11/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The American Public and U.S. Global Engagement: Mid-2019 Snapshot, with Ali Wyne
    06/10/2019
    Looking ahead to the 2020 election and the role that foreign policy will play on the campaign trail, Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev talks with RAND's Ali Wyne about the dominant international relations narrative in Trump-era Washington: "great-power competition." With Russia and China as the main competitors, how should we differentiate between the two nations? What is the U.S. actually competing for? And what would "victory" look like?
    06/10/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Iran Tensions & Secretary Shanahan, with Asha Castleberry
    05/30/2019
    National security expert and U.S. Army veteran Asha Castleberry breaks down the rising tensions with Iran and John Bolton's influence at the White House. She and host Alex Woodson also discuss the pluses and minuses of having former Boeing executive Patrick Shanahan in charge at the Department of Defense and she gives advice on how to figure out who or what to believe in this chaotic political environment.
    05/30/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • 100 Years After Versailles
    05/14/2019
    Just weeks after an armistice halted the most devastating conflict in generations, the victors of the Great War set out to negotiate the terms of the peace--and to rewrite the rules of international relations. A century later, we live in a world shaped by the Treaty of Versailles. In this fascinating discussion, a panel of distinguished historians delve into the complex situation on the ground at the time and the Treaty's legacy today, from Europe and the U.S. to Asia and the Middle East.
    05/14/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Ethics, Politics, & the Veteran Community, with Reed Bonadonna
    05/09/2019
    Senior Fellow Reed Bonadonna, a retired U.S. Marine Corps colonel, discusses the role of ethics in the transition to civilian life. With presidents Eisenhower and Grant as the ideal examples, he also details the attributes that veterans can bring to the political realm. Are the current group of veteran politicians better-positioned to work across the aisle? And what's changed in the White House now that three generals have left high-profile posts in the Trump administration?
    05/09/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Crack-Up: Winston Churchill & the Geopolitics of 1919, with Andrew Roberts
    04/08/2019
    In this episode of the Crack-Up series on 1919, Andrew Roberts, author of "Churchill: Walking with Destiny," examines how Churchill dealt with the complicated problems facing Great Britain at the end of World War I, including how to treat the Germans in defeat, his changing views on Russia--but always in pursuit of British national interests--his stance on a homeland for the Jews, and his determination to hold on to British India.
    04/08/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The New Rules of War: Victory in the Age of Durable Disorder, with Sean McFate
    03/19/2019
    "Nobody fights conventionally except for us anymore, yet we're sinking a big bulk, perhaps the majority of our defense dollars, into preparing for another conventional war, which is the very definition of insanity," declares national security strategist and former paratrooper Sean McFate. The U.S. needs to recognize that we're living in an age of "durable disorder"--a time of persistent, smoldering conflicts--and the old rules no longer apply.
    03/19/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Crack-Up: 1919 & the Birth of Modern Korea, with Kyung Moon Hwang
    03/14/2019
    Could the shared historical memory of March 1 ever be a source of unity between North Koreans and South Koreans? In this fascinating episode of The Crack-Up series that explores how 1919 shaped the modern world, Professor Kyung Moon Hwang discusses the complex birth of Korean nationhood and explains how both North and South Korea owe their origins and their national history narratives to the events swirling around March 1, 1919.
    03/14/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Sicilian Expedition and the Dilemma of Interventionism
    03/14/2019
    The Peloponnesian War has lessons for U.S. foreign policy beyond the Thucydides Trap. Johanna Hanink reminds us that the debate over moral exceptionalism and interventionism is nothing new.
    03/14/19Publications
  • Implications of the INF Withdrawal, with Jonathan Cristol
    02/28/2019
    Adelphi University's Jonathan Cristol discusses the Trump administration's decision to step away from the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty (INF) and its possible effects on international arms control. Why is this a positive development for Putin and Russia? Are other treaties and alliances in danger?
    02/28/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Enduring False Promise of Preventive War, with Scott A. Silverstone
    02/26/2019
    Does preventive war really work? "In the vast majority of cases historically, what we see is the country that thought it was saving itself from a greater danger in the future actually creates this greater danger because you generate a level of hostility, a deepening rivalry, and a desire for revenge that comes back to haunt them," says Scott Silverstone. His advice: Hesitate. Before taking action, think through this "preventive war paradox."
    02/26/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts

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