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  • 100 Years After Versailles
    05/14/2019
    Just weeks after an armistice halted the most devastating conflict in generations, the victors of the Great War set out to negotiate the terms of the peace--and to rewrite the rules of international relations. A century later, we live in a world shaped by the Treaty of Versailles. In this fascinating discussion, a panel of distinguished historians delve into the complex situation on the ground at the time and the Treaty's legacy today, from Europe and the U.S. to Asia and the Middle East.
    05/14/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Ethics, Politics, & the Veteran Community, with Reed Bonadonna
    05/09/2019
    Senior Fellow Reed Bonadonna, a retired U.S. Marine Corps colonel, discusses the role of ethics in the transition to civilian life. With presidents Eisenhower and Grant as the ideal examples, he also details the attributes that veterans can bring to the political realm. Are the current group of veteran politicians better-positioned to work across the aisle? And what's changed in the White House now that three generals have left high-profile posts in the Trump administration?
    05/09/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Crack-Up: Winston Churchill & the Geopolitics of 1919, with Andrew Roberts
    04/08/2019
    In this episode of the Crack-Up series on 1919, Andrew Roberts, author of "Churchill: Walking with Destiny," examines how Churchill dealt with the complicated problems facing Great Britain at the end of World War I, including how to treat the Germans in defeat, his changing views on Russia--but always in pursuit of British national interests--his stance on a homeland for the Jews, and his determination to hold on to British India.
    04/08/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The New Rules of War: Victory in the Age of Durable Disorder, with Sean McFate
    03/19/2019
    "Nobody fights conventionally except for us anymore, yet we're sinking a big bulk, perhaps the majority of our defense dollars, into preparing for another conventional war, which is the very definition of insanity," declares national security strategist and former paratrooper Sean McFate. The U.S. needs to recognize that we're living in an age of "durable disorder"--a time of persistent, smoldering conflicts--and the old rules no longer apply.
    03/19/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Crack-Up: 1919 & the Birth of Modern Korea, with Kyung Moon Hwang
    03/14/2019
    Could the shared historical memory of March 1 ever be a source of unity between North Koreans and South Koreans? In this fascinating episode of The Crack-Up series that explores how 1919 shaped the modern world, Professor Kyung Moon Hwang discusses the complex birth of Korean nationhood and explains how both North and South Korea owe their origins and their national history narratives to the events swirling around March 1, 1919.
    03/14/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Sicilian Expedition and the Dilemma of Interventionism
    03/14/2019
    The Peloponnesian War has lessons for U.S. foreign policy beyond the Thucydides Trap. Johanna Hanink reminds us that the debate over moral exceptionalism and interventionism is nothing new.
    03/14/19Publications
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Implications of the INF Withdrawal, with Jonathan Cristol
    02/28/2019
    Adelphi University's Jonathan Cristol discusses the Trump administration's decision to step away from the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty (INF) and its possible effects on international arms control. Why is this a positive development for Putin and Russia? Are other treaties and alliances in danger?
    02/28/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Enduring False Promise of Preventive War, with Scott A. Silverstone
    02/26/2019
    Does preventive war really work? "In the vast majority of cases historically, what we see is the country that thought it was saving itself from a greater danger in the future actually creates this greater danger because you generate a level of hostility, a deepening rivalry, and a desire for revenge that comes back to haunt them," says Scott Silverstone. His advice: Hesitate. Before taking action, think through this "preventive war paradox."
    02/26/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • How to Think about War: An Ancient Guide to Foreign Policy, with Johanna Hanink
    02/25/2019
    Why has there been a sudden interest in Thucydides, especially in the U.S.? Johanna Hanink discusses her new book of translations and introductions to key speeches from his "History of the Peloponnesian War," and the importance of the classics in general. "The book is of special interest to us here at Carnegie for its focus on ethics, democracy, and world affairs, all of which seem to be under stress these days," says Joel Rosenthal.
    02/25/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Crack-Up: Jazz Arrives, Loudly, in 1919, with David Sager
    02/22/2019
    In this fascinating podcast, Ted Widmer talks to jazz historian David Sager about his "New York Times" essay on the genre's breakthrough in 1919, its popularity in France during World War I, and the tragic story of legendary African American bandleader James Reese Europe.
    02/22/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: The U.S.-Taliban Negotiations, with Jonathan Cristol
    02/21/2019
    Jonathan Cristol, author of "The United States and Taliban before and after 9/11," discusses the status of the latest talks between the U.S. government and the Taliban, in an effort to end the decades-long war in Afghanistan. Are women's rights being addressed? Are neighboring countries' interests being taken into account? And can we trust the Trump administration in this tense geopolitical environment?
    02/21/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Jerome A. Cohen on the Taiwan Relations Act
    02/20/2019
    U.S.-Taiwan relations have long been an ingenious balancing act of "strategic ambiguity." What does the 1979 Taiwan Relations Act entail and why is it important, not only to Taiwan, but to U.S.-China relations and indeed security across Asia? Legendary China expert Jerome Cohen unpacks the history of Taiwan since 1895, its current situation and legal status, and what this could mean for Asia and the United States.
    02/20/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Perfect Weapon: War, Sabotage, and Fear in the Cyber Age, with David Sanger
    01/14/2019
    From the U.S. operation against Iran's nuclear enrichment plant, to Chinese theft of personal data, North Korea's financially motivated attacks on American companies, or Russia's interference in the 2016 election, cyberweapons have become the weapon of choice for democracies, dictators, and terrorists. "New York Times" national security correspondent David Sanger explains how and why cyberattacks are now the number one security threat.
    01/14/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: U.S. Defense Policy After Mattis, with Asha Castleberry
    01/09/2019
    National security expert and U.S. Army veteran Asha Castleberry makes sense of a busy and seemingly chaotic time for the Department of Defense in the wake of Secretary Mattis' departure. What should think about Trump's plans in Syria and Afghanistan? How is the U.S. planning to counter China in Africa? And has John Bolton actually been a moderating influence?
    01/09/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Ethics and the Syria Withdrawal
    01/03/2019
    Referencing an "Atlantic" article by Conor Fridersdorf, Nikolas Gvosdev goes over some important and overlooked ethical questions surrounding Trump's decision to withraw U.S. troops from Syria.
    01/03/19Publications
  • Global Ethics Weekly: A "Carefully Optimistic" Update on Yemen, with Waleed Alhariri
    12/20/2018
    Waleed Alhariri, U.S. director of the Sana'a Center for Strategic Studies, discusses major developments in the Yemen conflict, which remains the world's worst humanitarian crisis. With renewed momentum at the UN and in U.S. Congress, an increased international focus on the war after the Jamal Khashoggi murder, and a fragile ceasefire in Hudaydah, Yemen's biggest port, Alhariri is "carefully optimistic" that conditions could improve in the coming months.
    12/20/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Korean Peninsula: One of America’s Greatest Foreign Policy Challenges, with Christopher R. Hill
    12/14/2018
    There are few, if any, who understand the Korean Peninsula situation better than Ambassador Hill. He served as U.S. ambassador to South Korea and assistant secretary of state for East Asian and Pacific affairs, and was head of the U.S. delegation to the 2005 six-party talks aimed at resolving the North Korean nuclear crisis. In this wise and witty talk he explains where we are today, how we got here, and where we're likely to go in the future.
    12/14/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Russia's Information Warfare, with Molly McKew
    12/12/2018
    "You saw the Russians start to pay attention to social media, in particular after Obama's election, because the way that he was elected was new to them. They always watch our elections very closely. So you see them toying around in this whole space of the sphere of information, the use of information as a tool of political warfare, developing new tools." Molly McKew delves into Russian disinformation campaigns in the U.S. and elsewhere.
    12/12/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Just Out: "Ethics & International Affairs" Winter 2018 Issue
    12/07/2018
    The centerpiece of this issue is a roundtable on competing normative visions for cyberspace. It also features an essay taking stock of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights on the 70th anniversary of its adoption; a feature assessing proposals to restrain the use of the veto at the UN Security Council; review essays on international law and on human rights; and book reviews.
    12/07/18NewsPress Releases
  • Global Ethics Weekly: The End of World War I & the Future of American Democracy, with Ted Widmer
    12/06/2018
    Historian and Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Ted Widmer looks back to the end of the First World War, and the upheaval that followed it in Europe and the U.S., and forward to a new stage in the Trump presidency. Plus, he and host Alex Woodson discuss ways to improve American democracy and what can be learned from the legacy of President George H. W. Bush.
    12/06/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts

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