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  • Immigration: A National Security Imperative
    05/13/2019
    "The U.S. intelligence community is dependent on immigration to maintain language and cultural skills that protect American lives every day," writes military veteran Philip Caruso. "Although the immigration policy debate is often portrayed as a clash of American values, human rights, and pragmatic challenges, any solution must also recognize rational and pragmatic immigration as a national security imperative."
    05/13/19Publications
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Citizenship, Social Media, & the Indian Election, with Kavitha Rajagopalan
    05/01/2019
    Senior Fellow Kavitha Rajagopalan discusses the ongoing Indian election through the complicated lens of citizenship and explains the vast power of political organizing and social media in the "world's largest democracy." What's at stake if Prime Minister Narendra Modi (the frontrunner) wins reelection? How have he and the BJP been able to push Hindu nationalism? What does voter disenfranchisement look like in India?
    05/01/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • How Safe Are We? Homeland Security Since 9/11, with Janet Napolitano
    03/27/2019
    "Climate, cyber, then mass gun violence, sometimes motivated by terrorist ideology--and the ideology can most frequently be tied to far-right-wing extremism, sometimes tied to no ideology at all, sometimes tied to pathology. Those three things I think are the real risks that the Department [of Homeland Security] really should be focused on. In contrast, what is not a real risk is the conditions of the Southwest border."
    03/27/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: The Christchurch Attack & Immigration Policies, with Kavitha Rajagopalan
    03/21/2019
    A week after the horrific terrorist attack on two New Zealand mosques, Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Kavitha Rajagopalan discusses immigration policies and xenophobia in Australia and the United States and how they reverberate throughout the world. How should we respond to hateful rhetoric from politicians? What are some ways to make immigration and asylum work more efficiently and ethically?
    03/21/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The "Dirty War" and the History of Democracy in Argentina
    03/12/2019
    "Traveling from the United States for the first time at age 17, I thought I knew the definition of democracy: a system in which the representatives are chosen by the people and for the people—simple enough. In Argentina, I quickly learned that democracy was something much more fragile, emotional, and austere than I ever realized."
    03/12/19Publications
  • Global Ethics Weekly: The U.S.-Taliban Negotiations, with Jonathan Cristol
    02/21/2019
    Jonathan Cristol, author of "The United States and Taliban before and after 9/11," discusses the status of the latest talks between the U.S. government and the Taliban, in an effort to end the decades-long war in Afghanistan. Are women's rights being addressed? Are neighboring countries' interests being taken into account? And can we trust the Trump administration in this tense geopolitical environment?
    02/21/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • A Savage Order, with Rachel Kleinfeld
    11/09/2018
    Can violent societies get better? Rachel Kleinfeld discusses her latest book, "A Savage Order: How the World's Deadliest Countries Can Forge a Path to Security." Her conclusion is ultimately optimistic: Though it's never easy, real democracy (not autocracy in disguise) and a vibrant middle class can provide a path out of violence.
    11/09/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • "The Living Legacy of the First World War": Carnegie Council Marks the 100th Anniversary of Armistice Day
    11/09/2018
    On the 100th anniversary of the armistice, Carnegie Council's "The Living Legacy of the First World War" project joins other centennial initiatives that help rising generations to understand the weight and gravity of this moment in global history and the War's lasting imprint on the present.
    11/09/18NewsPress Releases
  • Global Ethics Weekly: The U.S. & the Taliban Before & After 9/11, with Jonathan Cristol
    11/08/2018
    When most Americans think about the Taliban, their minds go to Osama bin Laden, terrorism, and the endless war in Afghanistan. But as Jonathan Cristol writes in his book, "The United States and Taliban before and after 9/11," there is much more to the story as both sides met countless times in the 1990s, with the Taliban eager to have good relations with America. What was the bigger stumbling block for the U.S.: women's rights or al-Qaeda? What are the lessons for today?
    11/08/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Education for Peace: The Living Legacy of the First World War
    11/07/2018
    Four Fellows from Carnegie Council's "The Living Legacy of WWI" project present their research on different aspects of the war--counterterrorism, airpower, chemical warfare, and Latin America--and its long-term impacts. The panel was part of the Carnegie Peacebuilding Conversations, a three-day program at the Peace Palace in The Hague, Netherlands, presented in cooperation with Carnegie institutions worldwide and other partners.
    11/07/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Future of U.S. National Security, with Derek Reveron
    10/10/2018
    "Is it still fair to say there are continuities in foreign policy two years into the Trump administration? I'm going to say yes, and I'll offer some evidence," declares Derek S. Reveron of the U.S. Naval War College and Harvard Kennedy School. Don't miss this expert analysis of America's role in the world.
    10/10/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Meth Fiefdoms, Rebel Hideouts, & Bomb-Scarred Party Towns of Southeast Asia, with Patrick Winn
    10/01/2018
    From the world's largest meth trade in Myanmar to "Pyongyang's dancing queens," "neon jihad," and much more, Bangkok-based author Patrick Winn takes us on a tour of the underbelly of Southeast Asia. The region's criminal underworld is valued at $100 billion and in the next decade it's going to hit $375 billion, bigger than many of these country's GDPs, he says. These stories need to be told.
    10/01/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • YEMEN: An Economic Strategy to Ease the Humanitarian Crisis
    06/15/2018
    As the war in Yemen gets even worse, Dave Harden, former USAID minister counsellor to Yemen, offers a practical, multi-pronged economic strategy to improve household purchasing power and thus alleviate the suffering of the Yemeni people.
    06/15/18Publications
  • The Living Legacy of WWI: Counterterrorism Strategies in the War's Aftermath, with Mary Barton
    05/29/2018
    "It is important to look at terrorism from a historical perspective, to understand where the term came from and to not see it as being tied to any one group for any specific cause," says Mary Barton, a contract historian with the Office of the Secretary of Defense Historical Office, "because left-wing groups have used terrorist tactics; right-wing groups have used terrorist tactics; different religious extremists have used terrorist tactics,"
    05/29/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The French Far Right in Russia's Orbit
    05/15/2018
    "Far-right groups in France are not restricted to the party of the Le Pen family. They are diverse, operate through networks, and are now well within Russia's force field. But this is not only the result of Vladimir Putin's charisma or Marine Le Pen's need for funds. The Russian question has drawn French nationalist activists into combat, both at the rhetorical level...and at the level of armed combat."
    05/15/18Publications
  • From Cold War to Hot Peace: An American Ambassador in Putin's Russia, with Michael McFaul
    05/14/2018
    As Obama's adviser on Russian affairs, Michael McFaul helped craft the United States' policy known as "reset" that fostered new and unprecedented collaboration between the two countries. Then, as U.S. ambassador to Russia from 2012-2014, he had a front-row seat when this fleeting moment crumbled with Vladimir Putin's return to the presidency. "It's tragic," he says. "How is it that we have come back to something close to the Cold War?"
    05/14/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • "Why Terrorists Quit" in Indonesia, with Julie Chernov Hwang
    05/09/2018
    Over six years, Julie Chernov Hwang conducted over 100 interviews with current and former leaders and followers of radical Islamist groups in Indonesia to find out why some terrorists finally quit. What did she learn? The key is life skills training, family and community support, and personal development, she says. "If you are going to focus on deradicalization, focus it narrowly on use of violence. Don't try to overhaul someone's worldview."
    05/09/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Living Legacy of WWI: Chemical Weapons from the Great War to Syria, with Zach Dorfman
    05/01/2018
    "What you stopped seeing after World War I was great power conflict involving chemical weapons, and what you started seeing was asymmetric conflicts or regional conflicts that involved chemical weapons. That actually disturbed me even more because what I started realizing was that as time went on the weaker you were, the more likely that another state would use chemical weapons against you or your people."
    05/01/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Articles Resulting from Carnegie Council Religion and Tolerance Research Delegation to Indonesia, October 2017
    02/09/2018
    In October 2017, Carnegie Council's Asia Dialogues program led a group of 12 Pacific Delegates from seven countries and a diverse set of professional backgrounds to Indonesia. Amid growing Islamophobia and populism in Europe and the United States, a more complete picture of Islam is crucial, and as the world's largest Muslim nation, Indonesia has the potential to shape the way the world's fastest growing and most contentious religion is perceived worldwide.
    02/09/18Publications
  • A Tangled Embrace: What the JFK Papers Tell Us about the CIA's Anti-Castro Cuban Agents
    01/16/2018
    In 1976, Cubana Flight 455 was brought down by a terrorist bomb. All 72 people aboard perished. Anti-Castro terrorist and longtime CIA asset Luis Posada is widely considered responsible, yet today he lives in Florida, a free man. Why was critical information about Posada and the CIA buried in the recently released JFK assassination files, even though his case has no relation to JFK?
    01/16/18Publications

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