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  • What Americans Want
    05/08/2019
    The Center for American Progress has released their exhaustive survey of what Americans want in foreign policy and their results track closely with the conclusions reached by the U.S. Global Engagement study group. What remains to be seen, however, is whether the broad parameters of what Americans want in foreign policy will be taken up by any of the 2020 presidential candidates.
    05/08/19Publications
  • The Generational Divide?
    05/07/2019
    As Millennials and "Generation Z" begin to enter the ranks of both American politics as well as the expert community, it is uncertain if they will share the same assumptions about the role of the United States in international affairs, writes Nikolas Gvosdev.
    05/07/19Publications
  • Back to Spheres of Influence?
    05/03/2019
    National Security Adviser John Bolton's recent comments on Russia's interest in Venezuela bring back a concept prevalent in much earlier version of international affairs: spheres of influence. Was this a slip of the tongue or it could it set a precedent for other realms of U.S. foreign policy?
    05/03/19Publications
  • How Safe Are We? Homeland Security Since 9/11, with Janet Napolitano
    03/27/2019
    "Climate, cyber, then mass gun violence, sometimes motivated by terrorist ideology--and the ideology can most frequently be tied to far-right-wing extremism, sometimes tied to no ideology at all, sometimes tied to pathology. Those three things I think are the real risks that the Department [of Homeland Security] really should be focused on. In contrast, what is not a real risk is the conditions of the Southwest border."
    03/27/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The New Rules of War: Victory in the Age of Durable Disorder, with Sean McFate
    03/19/2019
    "Nobody fights conventionally except for us anymore, yet we're sinking a big bulk, perhaps the majority of our defense dollars, into preparing for another conventional war, which is the very definition of insanity," declares national security strategist and former paratrooper Sean McFate. The U.S. needs to recognize that we're living in an age of "durable disorder"--a time of persistent, smoldering conflicts--and the old rules no longer apply.
    03/19/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Enduring False Promise of Preventive War, with Scott A. Silverstone
    02/26/2019
    Does preventive war really work? "In the vast majority of cases historically, what we see is the country that thought it was saving itself from a greater danger in the future actually creates this greater danger because you generate a level of hostility, a deepening rivalry, and a desire for revenge that comes back to haunt them," says Scott Silverstone. His advice: Hesitate. Before taking action, think through this "preventive war paradox."
    02/26/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Toward a Human-Centric Approach to Cybersecurity, with Ronald Deibert
    01/29/2019
    Discussions around cybersecurity often focus on the security and sovereignty of states, not individuals, says Professor Ronald Deibert, founder and director of University of Toronto's Citizen Lab. If you start from a "human-centric perspective," it could lead to policies focusing on peace, prosperity, and human rights. How can we work toward this approach?
    01/29/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Perfect Weapon: War, Sabotage, and Fear in the Cyber Age, with David Sanger
    01/14/2019
    From the U.S. operation against Iran's nuclear enrichment plant, to Chinese theft of personal data, North Korea's financially motivated attacks on American companies, or Russia's interference in the 2016 election, cyberweapons have become the weapon of choice for democracies, dictators, and terrorists. "New York Times" national security correspondent David Sanger explains how and why cyberattacks are now the number one security threat.
    01/14/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: U.S. Defense Policy After Mattis, with Asha Castleberry
    01/09/2019
    National security expert and U.S. Army veteran Asha Castleberry makes sense of a busy and seemingly chaotic time for the Department of Defense in the wake of Secretary Mattis' departure. What should think about Trump's plans in Syria and Afghanistan? How is the U.S. planning to counter China in Africa? And has John Bolton actually been a moderating influence?
    01/09/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Call for Abstracts for Carnegie Council's May 3 Student Research Conference, Deadline March 8, 2019
    01/08/2019
    Abstracts should be no more than 500 words. Presentations will be 10 minutes long and must make a normative argument about international affairs and ethics. Topics can range from human rights, media, international law, justice, accountability, sustainability, and transparency.
    01/08/19NewsPress Releases
  • The Korean Peninsula: One of America’s Greatest Foreign Policy Challenges, with Christopher R. Hill
    12/14/2018
    There are few, if any, who understand the Korean Peninsula situation better than Ambassador Hill. He served as U.S. ambassador to South Korea and assistant secretary of state for East Asian and Pacific affairs, and was head of the U.S. delegation to the 2005 six-party talks aimed at resolving the North Korean nuclear crisis. In this wise and witty talk he explains where we are today, how we got here, and where we're likely to go in the future.
    12/14/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Russia's Information Warfare, with Molly McKew
    12/12/2018
    "You saw the Russians start to pay attention to social media, in particular after Obama's election, because the way that he was elected was new to them. They always watch our elections very closely. So you see them toying around in this whole space of the sphere of information, the use of information as a tool of political warfare, developing new tools." Molly McKew delves into Russian disinformation campaigns in the U.S. and elsewhere.
    12/12/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Ethics & International Affairs Volume 32.4 (Winter 2018)
    12/07/2018
    The centerpiece of this issue is a roundtable organized by Duncan B. Hollis and Tim Maurer on competing normative visions for cyberspace, with contributions from Ronald J. Deibert, Daniel J. Weitzner, Duncan B. Hollis and Jens David Ohlin, and Martha Finnemore. Additionally, the issue contains an essay by Ş. İlgü Özler taking stock of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights on the 70th anniversary of its adoption; a feature by Bolarinwa Adediran assessing proposals to restrain the use of the veto at the UN Security Council; review essays by Anne Peters on international law and Micheline Ishay on human rights; and book reviews by Richard Beardsworth, Rory Cox, Christopher J. Finlay, Avery Kolers, and Michael Skerker.
    12/07/18Publications
  • Just Out: "Ethics & International Affairs" Winter 2018 Issue
    12/07/2018
    The centerpiece of this issue is a roundtable on competing normative visions for cyberspace. It also features an essay taking stock of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights on the 70th anniversary of its adoption; a feature assessing proposals to restrain the use of the veto at the UN Security Council; review essays on international law and on human rights; and book reviews.
    12/07/18NewsPress Releases
  • A Savage Order, with Rachel Kleinfeld
    11/09/2018
    Can violent societies get better? Rachel Kleinfeld discusses her latest book, "A Savage Order: How the World's Deadliest Countries Can Forge a Path to Security." Her conclusion is ultimately optimistic: Though it's never easy, real democracy (not autocracy in disguise) and a vibrant middle class can provide a path out of violence.
    11/09/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Disaster Response & Ethics, with Malka Older
    10/11/2018
    Former Senior Fellow Malka Older, a novelist and aid worker, details the ethical and logistical sides of disaster response, drawing on her experiences in Sri Lanka, Fukushima, and Darfur. Why are "rich" countries sometimes less prepared to handle earthquakes and hurricanes? How is disaster response different in the United States? And with Hurricane Michael affecting millions this week, what are some practical ways to help?
    10/11/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Future of U.S. National Security, with Derek Reveron
    10/10/2018
    "Is it still fair to say there are continuities in foreign policy two years into the Trump administration? I'm going to say yes, and I'll offer some evidence," declares Derek S. Reveron of the U.S. Naval War College and Harvard Kennedy School. Don't miss this expert analysis of America's role in the world.
    10/10/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • All Options Are on the Table: Threats and Coercive Diplomacy in Foreign Affairs
    10/02/2018
    Are there ever justifiable reasons for issuing threats to achieve foreign policy objectives? In particular, are President Trump's threats against Iran justified? Don't miss this rare opportunity to get the Iranian perspective with this stimulating discussion between Drs. Reichberg and Syse of the Peace Research Insitute Oslo (PRIO) and H.E. Gholamali Khoshroo, permanent representative of Iran to the United Nations.
    10/02/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • China's Spies in California with Zach Dorfman
    09/11/2018
    "There is a significant counterintelligence threat on the West Coast of the U.S., and it differs in meaningful ways from what is commonly perceived of as counterintelligence work and targets on the East Coast," says Senior Fellow Zach Dorfman. He discusses shocking examples of Chinese espionage in particular, such as technology theft and spying on local politicians. The Chinese also exert pressure on diaspora communities to become more pro-PRC.
    09/11/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Identity in Colombia, with José Alejandro Cepeda
    09/10/2018
    Colombia's civil war lasted from the 1960s to 2016. How has this terrible experience shaped the Colombian identity and how long will it take before the nation truly recovers? In terms of the region as a whole, what role does European heritage in forming Latin American identities? In this fascinating conversation, Colombian journalist and political scientist José Alejandro Cepeda tackles all these issues and more.
    09/10/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts

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