• Ethical Dilemmas in Ensuring Human Security
    07/28/2020
    In this blog post, Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev reflects on his recent "Human Security is National Security in a Time of Pandemic" webinar with Derek Reveron. What are the ethical considerations for policymakers that involve real human security trade-offs?
    07/28/20Publications
  • "Remain in Mexico" & Immigration Policy in 2020, with Molly O'Toole
    06/24/2020
    Molly O'Toole, immigration and security reporter at the "Los Angeles Times," discusses Trump's "Remain in Mexico" asylum policy and its many ethical and legal issues. What's the status of challenges against this policy? How has it been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic? Plus, she draws some connections between the George Floyd protests against policy brutality and the issues that migrants face at the border.
    06/24/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Mysterious Machines: The Road Ahead for AI Ethics in International Security, with Arthur Holland Michel
    06/08/2020
    The last decade has witnessed a vibrant public discussion about how to safely, ethically, and legally integrate complex artificial intelligence (AI) into modern life, particularly in the sphere of security, says Senior Fellow Arthur Holland Michel. How do we learn to trust AI systems that we don't understand? What are the implications of this new technology as many nations confront a combination of mass protests and the pandemic?
    06/08/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Facial Recognition Technology, Policy, & the Pandemic, with Jameson Spivack
    04/07/2020
    Jameson Spivack, policy associate at Georgetown Law's Center on Privacy and Technology, discusses some of the most pressing policy issues when it comes to facial recognition technology in the United States and the ongoing pandemic. Why is Maryland's system so invasive? What are other states and cities doing? And, when it comes to surveillance and COVID-19, where's the line between privacy and security?
    04/07/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Internet Regulations Are the Superbugs of Speech
    01/31/2020
    This essay written by Jennifer Baek is the third prize winner of the high school category in the 2019 student essay contest. What can we learn about the dangers of internet regulation from countries such as China and South Korea? Like antibiotics, can regulation do more harm than good if not administered properly?
    01/31/20Publications
  • Internet Regulation: The Responsibility of the People
    01/31/2020
    This essay written by Justin Oh is the second prize winner of the high school category in the 2019 student essay contest. What have data and privacy breaches taught us about regulating the internet? How can users put economic pressure on companies to enforce the privacy protections they seek?
    01/31/20Publications
  • Big Data, Surveillance, and the Tradeoffs of Internet Regulation
    01/31/2020
    This essay written by Seungki Kim is the first prize winner of the high school category in the 2019 student essay contest. Should internet users be screened to prevent harm in the same way that an airline passenger would? Should we trust the government with such intimate data about ourselves?
    01/31/20Publications
  • Just War, Unjust Soldiers, & American Public Opinion, with Scott D. Sagan
    01/27/2020
    Do soldiers fighting for a "just cause" have more rights than soldiers fighting on the other side? In this interview following up on an "Ethics & International Affairs" article, Stanford's Professor Scott D. Sagan discusses the results of a study he conducted with Dartmouth's Professor Benjamin A. Valentino on how Americans think about this profound question.
    01/27/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Privacy, Surveillance, & the Terrorist Trap, with Tom Parker
    01/14/2020
    How can investigators utilize new technology like facial recognition software while respecting the rights of suspects and the general public? What are the consequences of government overreaction to terrorist threats? Tom Parker, author of "Avoiding the Terrorist Trap," discusses privacy, surveillance, and more in the context of counterterrorism.
    01/14/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • A Parting of Values: America First versus Transactionalism
    01/13/2020
    "The existing divide in American foreign policy discourse has been the extent to which the U.S. must actively propagate and spread its values, or defend them or promote them even when there is no interest at stake," writes Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev. How does American civil society demand consideration of moral and ethical concerns in the decisions both to go to war and how the war will be prosecuted?
    01/13/20Publications
  • Soleimani and the Democratic Primary Electorate
    01/06/2020
    In the aftermath of the U.S. drone strike on the commander of Iran's Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps, General Qassem Soleimani, senior fellow Nikolas Gvosdev studies the responses of the Democratic primary candidates. To what degree and scope do they see America's involvement and engagement in the world?
    01/06/20Publications
  • A Russian Take on the Kurds and U.S. Foreign Policy
    10/18/2019
    A Russian defense news site declared the United States an "unreliable ally" after the withdrawal of American troops from Northern Syria. Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev connects this characterization to the need for leaders to connect a specific policy action to a larger, understandable narrative for the American public.
    10/18/19Publications
  • Making AI Work, Ethically & Responsibly, with Heather M. Roff
    10/07/2019
    Heather M. Roff, senior research analyst at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab, thinks some researchers are having the wrong conversations about AI. Instead of wondering whether AI will ever be a moral agent, we should be focused on how to program the technology to be "morally safe, right, correct, justifiable." What are some practical uses for AI today? How can it be used responsibly in the military realm?
    10/07/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • What is the Status Quo for the Climate?
    09/04/2019
    At various points in history, changes in climate contributed to the movement of people and the collapse of empires. How will the current changes in the global climate shape discussions about foreign policy?
    09/04/19Publications
  • Beyond Trump
    08/20/2019
    Some countries are now coming to the same conclusions reached by the U.S. Global Engagement program: the 2016 election was not a "blip," but represents a break with the past. "In other words, no foreign government should bank on getting a better shake post-Trump."
    08/20/19Publications
  • Book Review: Northern Ireland’s Ghosts, Living in Plain Sight
    08/19/2019
    Even though much of the fighting in Northern Ireland has subsided, how has the lack of true reconciliation in the region influenced its society? This book review of Patrick Radden Keefe's "Say Nothing: A True Story of Murder and Memory in Northern Ireland" was originally published by the Carnegie Corporation of New York and is reposted with kind permission.
    08/19/19Publications
  • A New Era of Cyberwarfare, with Arun Vishwanath
    07/23/2019
    When the United States launched a massive cyberattack against Iran last month, it heralded "a new age of Internet warfare," says cybersecurity expert Arun Vishwanath. How could cyber-based conflicts change the nature of the Internet? Why is the U.S. especially vulnerable to these threats? And what would a "digital Geneva Convention" look like?
    07/23/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Eyes in the Sky: The Secret Rise of Gorgon Stare and How It Will Watch Us All, with Arthur Holland Michel
    06/26/2019
    Arthur Holland Michel, founder of the Center for the Study of the Drone, traces the development of the Pentagon's Gorgon Stare, one of the most powerful surveillance technologies ever created. When fused with big-data analysis techniques, this network can be used to watch everything simultaneously, and perhaps even predict attacks before they happen. Can we capitalize on its great promise while avoiding its potential perils?
    06/26/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The American Public and U.S. Global Engagement: Mid-2019 Snapshot, with Ali Wyne
    06/10/2019
    Looking ahead to the 2020 election and the role that foreign policy will play on the campaign trail, Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev talks with RAND's Ali Wyne about the dominant international relations narrative in Trump-era Washington: "great-power competition." With Russia and China as the main competitors, how should we differentiate between the two nations? What is the U.S. actually competing for? And what would "victory" look like?
    06/10/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • What Americans Want
    05/08/2019
    The Center for American Progress has released their exhaustive survey of what Americans want in foreign policy and their results track closely with the conclusions reached by the U.S. Global Engagement study group. What remains to be seen, however, is whether the broad parameters of what Americans want in foreign policy will be taken up by any of the 2020 presidential candidates.
    05/08/19Publications

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