• Facial Recognition Technology, Policy, & the Pandemic, with Jameson Spivack
    04/07/2020
    Jameson Spivack, policy associate at Georgetown Law's Center on Privacy and Technology, discusses some of the most pressing policy issues when it comes to facial recognition technology in the United States and the ongoing pandemic. Why is Maryland's system so invasive? What are other states and cities doing? And, when it comes to surveillance and COVID-19, where's the line between privacy and security?
    04/07/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Facing a Pandemic in the Dark
    04/03/2020
    Over 1 million Rohingya refugees living in crowded, unsanitary conditions in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh could soon be facing their own COVID-19 outbreak. Making their situation even more desperate is an Internet blockade, meaning they don't have access to life-saving information, writes Rohingya activist and educator Razia Sultana. How can international organizations help?
    04/03/20Publications
  • Narratives, Priorities, and Defense Spending
    04/02/2020
    Is the experience of the COVID-19 pandemic going to have major changes in how Americans perceive foreign policy? Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev considers this question and looks at how the pandemic could affect views on defense spending and narratives about the U.S. role in the world.
    04/02/20Publications
  • Ethics, International Affairs, & the COVID-19 Pandemic
    04/02/2020
    Even though our physical office in New York City is closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, our work has continued without pause. We are adapting to our new reality and our recent podcasts and blog posts reflect this. The effects of pandemic have deep implications for the future of international relations; how nations are using artificial intelligence, surveillance, and big data; and the ways that private citizens, corporations, and states communicate and receive information online, as disinformation and pseudoscience become even more dangerous.
    04/02/20NewsPress Releases
  • Taiwan's Digital Response to COVID-19, with Audrey Tang
    03/31/2020
    Despite being close to the initial epicenter of the virus, Taiwan was able to contain its COVID-19 outbreak earlier in 2020. Audrey Tang, Taiwan's digital minister, explains how her office helped in this effort by fighting disinformation with some innovative ideas. What can countries like the U.S. or Italy learn from Taiwan in the battle against this pandemic?
    03/31/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Responsible AI & the COVID-19 Pandemic, with Rumman Chowdhury
    03/26/2020
    How can we use artificial intelligence ethically during a crisis? How do we balance privacy with security and public health? Rumman Chowdhury, global lead for responsible AI at Accenture, discusses surveillance, supply chains, pseudoscience, Netflix, and much more as the world adjusts to social distancing.
    03/26/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Coronavirus Pandemic & International Relations, with Nikolas Gvosdev
    03/18/2020
    With the COVID-19 pandemic disrupting all aspects of daily life around the world, what will be the effect on international relations? Will it increase cooperation among nations, or will it lead to more conflict and competition? Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev and host Alex Woodson discuss these scenarios and also touch on how the virus has affected the Democratic primary, in which Joe Biden now has a commanding lead.
    03/18/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Does COVID-19 Change International Relations?
    03/17/2020
    Does a global pandemic change the nature of international affairs? Is it likely to foster international cooperation, or will it promote disintegrative tendencies within the global system? Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev shares his thoughts.
    03/17/20Publications
  • Peace By Poison: How the Coronavirus Could Fix Globalization Problems
    03/14/2020
    How is the COVID-19 pandemic stress-testing the international system? Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev writes that the virus is accelerating a series of disintegrative processes, which could end up ushering in the long-awaited post–Cold War world. This article was first published on March 14, 2020 and an excerpt was reprinted with the kind permission of "The National Interest."
    03/14/20Publications
  • Gene Editing, Slow Science, & Public Empowerment, with Françoise Baylis
    12/18/2019
    In the fourth podcast in Carnegie Council's gene editing podcast series, Dalhousie University's Professor Françoise Baylis, author of "Altered Inheritance," explains what "slow science" and "broad societal consensus" mean when it comes to this technology. She also details why public empowerment is vital for ethical gene editing and wonders if some of these procedures will stay in the realm of science fiction.
    12/18/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Ethics of Gene Editing & Human Enhancement, with Julian Savulescu
    12/11/2019
    What does "good ethics" means when it comes to gene editing? What types of conversations should we be having about this technology? Julian Savulescu, director of the Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics, shares his thoughts on these topics and more, including moral and human enhancement, and why he called Dr. He Jiankui's experiment "monstrous."
    12/11/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Gene Editing Governance & Dr. He Jiankui, with Jeffrey Kahn
    12/02/2019
    Jeffrey Kahn, director of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute for Bioethics, discusses the many governance issues connected to gene editing. Plus, he gives a first-hand account of an historic conference in Hong Kong last year in which Dr. He Jiankui shared his research on the birth of the world's first germline genetically engineered babies. What's the future of the governance of this emerging technology?
    12/02/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Gene Editing: Overview, Ethics, & the Near Future, with Robert Klitzman
    11/20/2019
    In the first in a series of podcasts on gene editing, Columbia's Dr. Robert Klitzman provides an overview of the technology, ethical and governance issues, and where it could all go in the near future. Plus he explains why the birth of genetically engineered twins in China last year was a "seismic" event. How could gene editing lead to more inequality? What could be some of unintended consequences?
    11/20/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Prioritizing the Linkages Between Sustainable Development Goals to Eradicate Child Marriage
    08/08/2019
    "Child marriage is both a cause and consequence of the other societal ills outlined in the UN's Sustainable Development Goals," writes human rights attorney Megan E. Corrado. This connection is especially stark in states like Afghanistan, which face instability due to conflict. What can governments and civil society do to help children in need? What are some grassroots approaches?
    08/08/19Publications
  • Just Out: "Ethics & International Affairs" Summer 2019 Issue
    06/11/2019
    The highlight of this issue is a roundtable on "Artificial Intelligence and the Future of Global Affairs," with contributions from Heather M. Roff, Steven Livingston and Mathias Risse, Jeffrey D. Sachs, Amandeep Singh Gill, Sara E. Davies, and Patrick Lin and Fritz Allhoff. The contributions consider how artificial intelligence will affect human rights, economic development, international security, global health, and the Arctic frontier in the coming decades.
    06/11/19NewsPress Releases
  • Ethics & International Affairs Volume 33.2 (Summer 2019)
    06/07/2019
    This issue features a roundtable on artificial intelligence and the future of global affairs. It also contains essays about the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption; the ethics of the "pluriverse;" diversity and hierarchy in international politics; and much more.
    06/07/19Publications
  • Josephine Marrocco Wins 2019 Carnegie Council Student Research Conference: Topic, AIDS Crisis in Russia
    05/10/2019
    The winning presentation in this year's Student Research Conference was by Josephine Marrocco of Fordham University in New York. Her presentation "Sex, Drugs and Propaganda: Why AIDS persists in the Russian Federation" examines the use of government propaganda in the context of Russia's AIDS crisis.
    05/10/19NewsPress Releases
  • Sex, Drugs, and Propaganda: Why AIDS Persists in the Russian Federation
    05/10/2019
    On May 3, 2019, Josephine Marrocco's presentation on HIV/AIDS in Russia was selected as the winner of the Council's fifth annual Student Research Conference. Afterwards, Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Devin Stewart, who organized the conference, conducted this email interview with her about her research.
    05/10/19Publications
  • Jingjing Zhang: Greening China's Globalization
    02/20/2019
    Born in China, environmental lawyer Jingjing Zhang is working to hold China accountable for the negative impacts of its overseas investment and construction projects, the value of which is close to $2 trillion. Known as the "Erin Brockovich of China," she investigates cases from Africa to Latin America to Southeast Asia, to ensure Chinese companies' compliance with environmental laws and international human rights standards.
    02/20/19Publications
  • Carnegie Council Presents "The Crack-Up," a Podcast Series about the Pivotal Year of 1919
    02/12/2019
    Created and hosted by historian and Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Ted Widmer, "The Crack-Up" is a special podcast series about the events of 1919, a turbulent year that in many ways shaped the 20th century and the modern world. Widmer is working with The "New York Times" on a series of long features on the legacy of 1919 and these podcasts are designed to complement the articles by interviewing each of the authors.
    02/12/19NewsPress Releases

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