• Suleimani Is Dead, but Diplomacy Shouldn’t Be
    01/08/2020
    Carnegie Council fellow and Pacific Delegate Philip Caruso advocates for the value of diplomacy in the aftermath of the U.S. killing Iran's general Qassem Suleimani. "Iran cannot win a war against the United States, nor can the United States afford to fight one," he argues. This article was originally published in "Foreign Policy" and is posted here with kind permission.
    01/08/20Publications
  • Back to School with Carnegie Council's New High School Resources
    08/30/2019
    With the new school year in mind, Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs has added timely new high school materials to its extensive online education section. Carnegie Council created high school level world and U.S. history resources based on opinion pieces from "The New York Times" "1919: The Year of the Crack Up" series and Carnegie Council senior fellow Ted Widmer's accompanying podcast.
    08/30/19NewsPress Releases
  • Ethics & International Affairs Volume 32.3 (Fall 2018)
    09/05/2018
    The centerpiece of this issue is a roundtable guest-edited by James Pattison on the ethics of overlooked alternatives to war, with contributions from Alex J. Bellamy, Corneliu Bjola, Cécile Fabre, Michael L. Gross, and James Pattison. Additionally, the issue contains an essay by Ian Hurd on the empire of international legalism; a feature by Alejandra Mancilla evaluating the moral force of territorial claims in Antarctica; a review essay by George DeMartino on sensible globalization in an illiberal era; and book reviews by Eleanor Gordon, Marcus Carlsen Häggrot, Shadi Mokhtari, and Serena Parekh.
    09/05/18Publications
  • Just Out: "Ethics & International Affairs" Fall 2018 Issue
    09/05/2018
    The centerpiece of this issue is a roundtable guest-edited by James Pattison on the ethics of overlooked alternatives to war, with contributions from Alex J. Bellamy, Corneliu Bjola, Cécile Fabre, Michael L. Gross, and James Pattison. Additionally, the issue contains an essay by Ian Hurd on the empire of international legalism; a feature by Alejandra Mancilla evaluating the moral force of territorial claims in Antarctica; a review essay by George DeMartino on sensible globalization in an illiberal era; and book reviews by Eleanor Gordon, Marcus Carlsen Häggrot, Shadi Mokhtari, and Serena Parekh.
    09/05/18NewsPress Releases
  • Free-Enterprise Solutions to Climate Change, with Bob Inglis
    10/05/2017
    Republican politician Bob Inglis used to think that climate change was nonsense; but his son--and science--changed his mind. Today he advocates letting market forces do their work. "The thing to do is to make it apparent in the marketplace what the costs of energy are, and eliminate all the subsidies, and have a level playing field and a strong competition. If you do that, we can fix climate change. That is what needs to be done."
    10/05/17MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Ottoman Road to War: Mustafa Aksakal on the Ottomans' Fateful Decision
    10/15/2014
    Why did the Ottoman Empire side with Germany in World War I? It was a rational decision, given the circumstances at the time, argues Aksakal. But it brought down the empire and violently reshaped the region's borders at horrifying human cost. Indeed, WWI informs national identities even today.
    10/15/14Publications
  • Cataclysm: David Stevenson on World War I as Political Tragedy
    06/18/2014
    David Stevenson discusses the military and political decisions on both sides that led to World War I; the Eastern, Balkan, and Italian Fronts, which are often overlooked; the role of the colonies for the Allies; and much more.
    06/18/14Publications
  • "Ethics & International Affairs" Summer Issue
    06/13/2014
    This issue features essays by Roger Berkowitz on "Drones and the Question of 'The Human'" and Alan Sussman on the philosophical foundations of human rights; a special centennial roundtable on "The Future of Human Rights," featuring Beth A. Simmons, Philip Alston, James W. Nickel, Jack Donnelly, and Andrew Gilmour; a review essay by Jens Bartelson on empire and sovereignty; and book reviews by Dale Jamieson, Tom Bailey, and Simon Cotton.
    06/13/14NewsPress Releases
  • The Last Empire: The Final Days of the Soviet Union
    06/06/2014
    Serhii Plokhy presents a bold new interpretation of the Soviet Union's final months, which places Ukraine at the center of the drama. And by providing the historical background for what is happening now, he shows that there are many key points linking 1991 to today.
    06/06/14MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Ethics of Avoiding Conflict with China
    03/19/2014
    Is there a policy prescription that can avoid turning predictions of a Sino-American clash into a self-fulfilling prophecy?
    03/19/14Publications
  • To End All Wars: Adam Hochschild on World War I
    02/27/2014
    The consequences of World War I are still with us, says Adam Hochschild. Are we in danger of making the same mistakes again? Why were Europeans so eager to go to war? What happened to those who publicly opposed it? Read the answers to these questions and more in this fascinating interview.
    02/27/14Publications
  • China's Unilateral Sanctions
    06/13/2013
    China's opposition to economic sanctions is legendary, yet there has been a subtle but significant shift in its own use of such sanctions. This represents an important trend in Chinese foreign policy--one that U.S. policymakers should take seriously.
    06/13/13Publications
  • The Measure of Civilization: How Social Development Decides the Fate of Nations
    03/21/2013
    Ian Morris demonstrates that social development can be measured across thousands of years. Based on past trends, what can we expect in the future? For one thing, the pace of change has accelerated. Morris predicts that the 21st century is going to be a "race between shifts in the balance of power, a transformation of humanity, and catastrophe."
    03/21/13MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • From the Ruins of Empire: The Intellectuals Who Remade Asia
    10/02/2012
    Pankaj Mishra explores the little-known history of the first generation of Asian intellectuals, such as China's Liang Qichao and the Persian political activist al-Afghani, and discusses how their ideas influenced Asia's postcolonial state-building programs.
    10/02/12MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Unraveling: Pakistan in the Age of Jihad
    10/03/2011
    U.S. Foreign Service officer John Schmidt explains how the complex, dangerous relationship between the leaders of Pakistan and various jihadist groups came about, and how it all began to unravel after 9/11.
    10/03/11MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • "Globalizing Justice: The Ethics of Poverty and Power" by Richard W. Miller [Full Text]
    09/20/2011
    In "Globalizing Justice," Miller argues that although we have a limited duty to respond to "neediness as such," the major source of our "vast, unmet global responsibility" to help the global poor is a duty not to take advantage of their deprivation when pursuing our own goals.
    09/20/11PublicationsEthics & International Affairs Volume 25.3 (Fall 2011)Book Reviews [Full Text]
  • Thomas E. Graham on the End of the Cold War and Beyond
    08/05/2011
    Graham discusses the turbulent period of the mid-1980s to the mid-1990s in Russia, including the relationship between Yeltsin and Gorbachev and the role of other prominent people of the time.  He goes on to analyze the post-Cold War multi-polar world.
    08/05/11MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Next Decade: Where We've Been...and Where We're Going
    02/03/2011
    The challenge of the next decade is not American power, says George Friedman. It is the preservation of the republic through a management of the international system that faces the fact that, intended or not, we're an empire. So long as we refuse to face that, we can't be effective.
    02/03/11MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Why the West Rules--For Now: The Patterns of History, and What They Reveal About the Future
    11/08/2010
    Ian Morris draws on 50,000 years of history, archeology, and the methods of social science, to make sense of when, how, and why the paths of development differed in the East and West—and what this portends for the 21st century.
    11/08/10MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Washington Rules: America's Path to Permanent War
    10/08/2010
    It is time to examine the Washington consensus on national security and why it must change, says Professor Bacevich--and to acknowledge that fixing Afghanistan should not take precedence over fixing Detroit.
    10/08/10MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts

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