• Ethics & International Affairs Volume 34.2 (Summer 2020)
    07/09/2020
    The highlight of the Summer 2020 issue of "Ethics & International Affairs" is a roundtable organized by Daniel R. Brunstetter on limited strikes and the associated ethical, legal, and strategic concerns. The collection contains contributions from Daniel R. Brunstetter, Wendy Pearlman, Jean-Baptiste Jeangène Vilmer, Danielle L. Lupton, and Eric A. Heinze and Rhiannon Neilsen.
    07/09/20Publications
  • Just Out: "Ethics & International Affairs" Summer 2020 Issue
    07/09/2020
    The highlight of the Summer 2020 issue of "Ethics & International Affairs" is a roundtable organized by Daniel R. Brunstetter on limited strikes and the associated ethical, legal, and strategic concerns. The collection contains contributions from Daniel R. Brunstetter, Wendy Pearlman, Jean-Baptiste Jeangène Vilmer, Danielle L. Lupton, and Eric A. Heinze and Rhiannon Neilsen.
    07/09/20NewsPress Releases
  • Hungary and the Values Test
    03/31/2020
    In the wake of the Hungarian parliament's vote to allow the executive to rule by decree, Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev reflects on the call by some to expel Hungary from the North Atlantic Treaty Organization--on the grounds that the country no longer upholds the liberal-democratic values that should form the basis of the security association.
    03/31/20Publications
  • The Future of Artificial Intelligence, with Stuart J. Russell
    02/24/2020
    UC Berkley's Professor Stuart J. Russell discusses the near- and far-future of artificial intelligence, including self-driving cars, killer robots, governance, and why he's worried that AI might destroy the world. How can scientists reconfigure AI systems so that humans will always be in control? How can we govern this emerging technology across borders? What can be done if autonomous weapons are deployed in 2020?
    02/24/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Crack-Up: The Birth of the Modern Middle East, with Ted Widmer
    01/31/2020
    At the end of World War I, colonial powers carved up the Ottoman Empire and the reverberations are still being felt today. Historian Ted Widmer discusses the circumstances that led to this fateful episode and why Woodrow Wilson wasn't able to extend his principle of "self-determination" to the Middle East. How should we think about the Trump-Netanyahu peace plan in the context of what happened in Palestine in 1919?
    01/31/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Ill Winds: Saving Democracy from Russian Rage, Chinese Ambition, and American Complacency, with Larry Diamond
    06/20/2019
    Larry Diamond's core argument is stark: the defense and advancement of democratic ideals relies on U.S. global leadership. If the U.S. does not reclaim its traditional place as the keystone of democracy, today's authoritarian trend could become a tsunami that could provide an opening for Vladimir Putin, Xi Jinping, and their admirers to turn the 21st century into a dark time of surging authoritarianism.
    06/20/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • How to Lose a Country: The 7 Steps from Democracy to Dictatorship, with Ece Temelkuran
    06/03/2019
    In her new book, award-winning Turkish novelist and political commentator Ece Temelkuran lays out the seven steps from democracy to dictatorship. "Some of these steps might be invisible to people even when they are living in it," she says, "so I wanted to make sure that people of the world, especially Western societies, can see what is happening to them so they won't lose time like we did in Turkey. I hope they won't end up losing their country as we did."
    06/03/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Romania: NATO's Frail Anchor in a Turbulent Black Sea
    04/05/2019
    "This week, together with six other former communist bloc countries, Romania marks the 15th anniversary of its NATO accession," writes Theo Stan. "If it succeeds to get its act together the country's pro-U.S. posture and diplomacy may never have weighed more in anchoring Euro-Atlantic stability."
    04/05/19Publications
  • Global Ethics Weekly: U.S. Defense Policy After Mattis, with Asha Castleberry
    01/09/2019
    National security expert and U.S. Army veteran Asha Castleberry makes sense of a busy and seemingly chaotic time for the Department of Defense in the wake of Secretary Mattis' departure. What should think about Trump's plans in Syria and Afghanistan? How is the U.S. planning to counter China in Africa? And has John Bolton actually been a moderating influence?
    01/09/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Ethics and the Syria Withdrawal
    01/03/2019
    Referencing an "Atlantic" article by Conor Fridersdorf, Nikolas Gvosdev goes over some important and overlooked ethical questions surrounding Trump's decision to withraw U.S. troops from Syria.
    01/03/19Publications
  • Jailing of Journalists Worldwide, with CPJ's Elana Beiser
    12/19/2018
    Elana Beiser of the Committee to Protect Journalists discusses the latest CPJ report, which finds that for the third year in a row, 251 or more journalists are jailed around the world, suggesting the authoritarian approach to critical news coverage is more than a temporary spike. Also for the third year running, Turkey, China, and Egypt were responsible for about half of those imprisoned, with Turkey remaining the world's worst jailer.
    12/19/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Refugees, from Utica to Uganda, with Kavitha Rajagopalan
    09/27/2018
    As the Trump administration cuts refugee resettlement in the U.S. to its lowest number in decades, this population in other nations has exploded in recent years. Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Kavitha Rajagopalan details what this looks like for one refugee in Utica, New York and the challenges that countries like Uganda and Turkey are facing.
    09/27/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Vision: Saving the Old or Building the New?
    08/03/2018
    Senior fellow Nikolas Gvosdev unpacks why some scholars seek to save and preserve the U.S. role in the "liberal international order," and why others want to embrace a new vision.
    08/03/18Publications
  • The People vs. Democracy: Why Our Freedom Is in Danger and How to Save It, with Yascha Mounk
    04/23/2018
    Harvard's Yascha Mounk argues that liberalism and democracy are coming apart, creating new forms of illiberal democracy (democracy without rights) and undemocratic liberalism (rights without democracy). Populist leaders are flourishing; indeed, Hungary is on the verge of descending into dictatorship, with shamefully little criticism from the Europe or the U.S. What are the causes of this phenomenon? What can we do about it?
    04/23/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Return of Marco Polo's World, with Robert D. Kaplan
    03/16/2018
    If you wish to understand the depth and breadth of the geographical, historical, technological, and political forces that are shaping our world, there is no better guide than Robert Kaplan. Using Marco Polo's journey as "a geographical framing device for Eurasia today," he examines China's ambitious One Belt One Road project, dissecting China's imperial dream and its multiple, under-reported objectives.
    03/16/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • To Fight Against This Age: On Fascism and Humanism, with Rob Riemen
    02/05/2018
    No more euphemisms and denials, says Rob Riemen in this frightening and inspiring talk. Call it by its name: fascism. Neither technology, nor economic growth, nor political activism can fix this, he continues. We must create a new counterculture that replaces kitsch and conformism with truth, empathy, beauty, and justice.
    02/05/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Fractured Continent: Europe's Crises and the Fate of the West, with William Drozdiak
    12/07/2017
    In some ways Europe is more fragmented than at any time in the last three decades, says Drozdiak. There's a north/south split between wealthy creditor nations and deeply indebted ones; an east/west divide, as Poland and Hungary revert to nationalism; pressures of regional separatism; Brexit; and the migrant crisis. Then there's Trump, who sees Europe as a burden and economic rival. 2018 could be a pivotal year. What will happen?
    12/07/17MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Rescue: Refugees and the Political Crisis of Our Time, with David Miliband
    12/04/2017
    Today there are 65 million people who have fled their homes because of conflict or persecution, says the International Rescue Committee's David Miliband. These are refugees not economic migrants, and half of them are children. It's a long-term crisis that will last our lifetimes. Why should we care? And what can we do about it, both at a policy level and as individuals?
    12/04/17MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • False Dawn: Protest, Democracy, and Violence in the New Middle East, with Steven A. Cook
    10/30/2017
    Half a decade after Arabs across the Middle East poured into the streets to demand change, hopes for democracy have disappeared in a maelstrom of violence and renewed state repression. How did things go so wrong so quickly across a wide range of regimes? What role can and should the United States play? Don't miss this conversation with Steven Cook, an expert on Arab and Turkish politics as well as U.S.-Middle East policy.
    10/30/17MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Carnegie Council Fellows Respond: Making Ethics Matter, 2017
    09/26/2017
    Carnegie Council has pledged to be a counter-force to the corrosive tone that frequently dominates the news; to focus on the ethical principles at stake; and to set an example by demonstrating fact-based, civil dialogue. Carnegie Council Fellows respond with their perspectives on the troubling and divisive issues we face today.
    09/26/17Publications

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