• COVID-19 in Conflict Zones, with Kelly Razzouk
    05/19/2020
    Countries like Syria and Libya are facing a "double" emergency right now, says the International Rescue Committee's Kelly Razzouk, as these states are having to deal with ongoing conflict, along with the COVID-19 outbreak. How has the IRC been responding to these situations? What more can the UN Security Council do?
    05/19/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • What Do Americans Think . . .
    03/09/2020
    The U.S. Global Engagement program at Carnegie Council has been conducting a survey of attitudes about U.S. foreign policy with an eye to understanding where Americans are prepared to accept risks or prioritize tradeoffs with competing clusters of values and interests. Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev reviews some of the preliminary results.
    03/09/20Publications
  • The Future of Artificial Intelligence, with Stuart J. Russell
    02/24/2020
    UC Berkley's Professor Stuart J. Russell discusses the near- and far-future of artificial intelligence, including self-driving cars, killer robots, governance, and why he's worried that AI might destroy the world. How can scientists reconfigure AI systems so that humans will always be in control? How can we govern this emerging technology across borders? What can be done if autonomous weapons are deployed in 2020?
    02/24/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Fighting ISIS Online, with Asha Castleberry-Hernandez
    11/08/2019
    National security expert Asha Castleberry-Hernandez discusses what "ISIS 2.0" means and how the terrorist group has used social media to recruit and spread its message. How has its strategy changed since the death of its leader Abur Bakr al-Baghdadi? What can the U.S. military, Congress, and executive branch do better to fight the group online?
    11/08/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • A Russian Take on the Kurds and U.S. Foreign Policy
    10/18/2019
    A Russian defense news site declared the United States an "unreliable ally" after the withdrawal of American troops from Northern Syria. Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev connects this characterization to the need for leaders to connect a specific policy action to a larger, understandable narrative for the American public.
    10/18/19Publications
  • Ill Winds: Saving Democracy from Russian Rage, Chinese Ambition, and American Complacency, with Larry Diamond
    06/20/2019
    Larry Diamond's core argument is stark: the defense and advancement of democratic ideals relies on U.S. global leadership. If the U.S. does not reclaim its traditional place as the keystone of democracy, today's authoritarian trend could become a tsunami that could provide an opening for Vladimir Putin, Xi Jinping, and their admirers to turn the 21st century into a dark time of surging authoritarianism.
    06/20/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Iran Tensions & Secretary Shanahan, with Asha Castleberry
    05/30/2019
    National security expert and U.S. Army veteran Asha Castleberry breaks down the rising tensions with Iran and John Bolton's influence at the White House. She and host Alex Woodson also discuss the pluses and minuses of having former Boeing executive Patrick Shanahan in charge at the Department of Defense and she gives advice on how to figure out who or what to believe in this chaotic political environment.
    05/30/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • 100 Years After Versailles
    05/14/2019
    Just weeks after an armistice halted the most devastating conflict in generations, the victors of the Great War set out to negotiate the terms of the peace--and to rewrite the rules of international relations. A century later, we live in a world shaped by the Treaty of Versailles. In this fascinating discussion, a panel of distinguished historians delve into the complex situation on the ground at the time and the Treaty's legacy today, from Europe and the U.S. to Asia and the Middle East.
    05/14/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Immigration: A National Security Imperative
    05/13/2019
    "The U.S. intelligence community is dependent on immigration to maintain language and cultural skills that protect American lives every day," writes military veteran Philip Caruso. "Although the immigration policy debate is often portrayed as a clash of American values, human rights, and pragmatic challenges, any solution must also recognize rational and pragmatic immigration as a national security imperative."
    05/13/19Publications
  • How Change Happens, with Cass Sunstein
    04/23/2019
    From the French Revolution to the Arab Spring to #MeToo, how does social change happen? In a book that was 25 years in the making, Cass Sunstein unpacks this puzzle by exploring the interplay of three decisive factors. Don't miss this insightful talk. It may change how you view the world.
    04/23/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The New Rules of War: Victory in the Age of Durable Disorder, with Sean McFate
    03/19/2019
    "Nobody fights conventionally except for us anymore, yet we're sinking a big bulk, perhaps the majority of our defense dollars, into preparing for another conventional war, which is the very definition of insanity," declares national security strategist and former paratrooper Sean McFate. The U.S. needs to recognize that we're living in an age of "durable disorder"--a time of persistent, smoldering conflicts--and the old rules no longer apply.
    03/19/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: U.S. Defense Policy After Mattis, with Asha Castleberry
    01/09/2019
    National security expert and U.S. Army veteran Asha Castleberry makes sense of a busy and seemingly chaotic time for the Department of Defense in the wake of Secretary Mattis' departure. What should think about Trump's plans in Syria and Afghanistan? How is the U.S. planning to counter China in Africa? And has John Bolton actually been a moderating influence?
    01/09/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Ethics and the Syria Withdrawal
    01/03/2019
    Referencing an "Atlantic" article by Conor Fridersdorf, Nikolas Gvosdev goes over some important and overlooked ethical questions surrounding Trump's decision to withraw U.S. troops from Syria.
    01/03/19Publications
  • Jailing of Journalists Worldwide, with CPJ's Elana Beiser
    12/19/2018
    Elana Beiser of the Committee to Protect Journalists discusses the latest CPJ report, which finds that for the third year in a row, 251 or more journalists are jailed around the world, suggesting the authoritarian approach to critical news coverage is more than a temporary spike. Also for the third year running, Turkey, China, and Egypt were responsible for about half of those imprisoned, with Turkey remaining the world's worst jailer.
    12/19/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Youth Unemployment & Refugees in the Middle East & North Africa, with Mariel Davis
    10/25/2018
    The Middle East and North Africa has a huge youth and young adult population--65 percent of the people in the region are under 30--but unfortunately unemployment among this group remains high. Education for Employment's Mariel Davis details how the organization is working to change this. She also discusses the challenges facing refugees, with a focus on Jordan.
    10/25/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Future of U.S. National Security, with Derek Reveron
    10/10/2018
    "Is it still fair to say there are continuities in foreign policy two years into the Trump administration? I'm going to say yes, and I'll offer some evidence," declares Derek S. Reveron of the U.S. Naval War College and Harvard Kennedy School. Don't miss this expert analysis of America's role in the world.
    10/10/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Ethics, Russia, and Syria
    08/13/2018
    How can Moscow can support a dictator who has used chemical weapons in his desperate attempts to retain power at all costs? And what does it say about American foreign policy when Washington won't mount the effort needed to remove him?
    08/13/18Publications
  • The Rise and Fall (and Rise) of Chemical Weapons
    08/07/2018
    "Chemical weapons have been used in almost every decade since their advent just over a century ago. They are not a specter, like nuclear weapons. We know their effects, and how numerous states have employed them, and how they might do so in the future. In fact, after a few decades of relative non-use, chemical-weapons attacks have again exploded onto the scene--as a weapon of war, terror, and as a tool of state assassination."
    08/07/18Publications
  • Why Ethics Matter in International Affairs
    05/31/2018
    How can you ensure that ethics are a core component, not only of an international affairs education, but of graduates' performance once they go out in the field? In this event for students and alumni of the Elliott School of International Affairs, the School's Dean Brigety and Professors Nolan and Kojm, along with Carnegie Council President Rosenthal, discuss the thorny issues of ethics, leadership, and practice in international relations.
    05/31/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Living Legacy of WWI: Counterterrorism Strategies in the War's Aftermath, with Mary Barton
    05/29/2018
    "It is important to look at terrorism from a historical perspective, to understand where the term came from and to not see it as being tied to any one group for any specific cause," says Mary Barton, a contract historian with the Office of the Secretary of Defense Historical Office, "because left-wing groups have used terrorist tactics; right-wing groups have used terrorist tactics; different religious extremists have used terrorist tactics,"
    05/29/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts

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