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  • Global Ethics Weekly: The Mueller Report & U.S. Foreign Policy, with Jonathan Cristol
    05/21/2019
    A lot of the talk about the Mueller Report has focused on its political and legal implications, but how will it affect U.S. foreign policy? Adelphi College's Jonathan Cristol discusses the reactions of allies and adversaries to Trump's passivity in the face of massive Russian interference in the U.S. election and congressional inaction and public apathy concerning presidential corruption. Plus, he details recent U.S. policy moves on Iran and the significance of NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg's speech to U.S. Congress.
    05/21/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Computational Propaganda, with Nick Monaco
    03/20/2019
    In this in-depth conversation, Oxford Internet Institute researcher Nick Monaco reviews the history of computational propaganda (online disinformation), which goes back almost two decades and includes countries ranging from Mexico to South Korea. His topics include Russia's IRA (Internet Research Agency), the role of China's Huawei, and a recent case study on Taiwan, where "digital democracy meets automated autocracy."
    03/20/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Crack-Up: 1919 & the Birth of Modern Korea, with Kyung Moon Hwang
    03/14/2019
    Could the shared historical memory of March 1 ever be a source of unity between North Koreans and South Koreans? In this fascinating episode of The Crack-Up series that explores how 1919 shaped the modern world, Professor Kyung Moon Hwang discusses the complex birth of Korean nationhood and explains how both North and South Korea owe their origins and their national history narratives to the events swirling around March 1, 1919.
    03/14/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Winners of Carnegie Council's International Student Essay Contest 2018 - Is it Important to Live in a Democracy?
    03/12/2019
    The topic: Is it important to live in a democracy? Winners come from Argentina, China, Colombia, Ghana, Hungary, South Korea, Tunisia, and the USA. Read their different perspectives here.
    03/12/19NewsPress Releases
  • Democracy: The Keystone of our Society
    03/12/2019
    South Korea has flourished as a democracy, while the North is suffering under authoritarianism. "By offering uncensored education, freedom of speech, and the unbridled agency to act, democracy empowers its people to develop abilities to conjure and execute revolutionary solutions to these shortcomings. As a result, democracy is adaptable, progressive, and resilient," writes You Young Kim.
    03/12/19Publications
  • The Enduring False Promise of Preventive War, with Scott A. Silverstone
    02/26/2019
    Does preventive war really work? "In the vast majority of cases historically, what we see is the country that thought it was saving itself from a greater danger in the future actually creates this greater danger because you generate a level of hostility, a deepening rivalry, and a desire for revenge that comes back to haunt them," says Scott Silverstone. His advice: Hesitate. Before taking action, think through this "preventive war paradox."
    02/26/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Future is Asian, with Parag Khanna
    02/12/2019
    "The rise of China is not the biggest story in the world," says Parag Khanna. "The Asianization of Asia, the return of Asia, the rise of the Asian system, is the biggest story in the world." This new Asian system, where business, technology, globalization, and geopolitics are intertwined, stretches from Japan to Saudi Arabia, from Australia to Russia, and Indonesia to Turkey, linking 5 billion people.
    02/12/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Korean Peninsula: One of America’s Greatest Foreign Policy Challenges, with Christopher R. Hill
    12/14/2018
    There are few, if any, who understand the Korean Peninsula situation better than Ambassador Hill. He served as U.S. ambassador to South Korea and assistant secretary of state for East Asian and Pacific affairs, and was head of the U.S. delegation to the 2005 six-party talks aimed at resolving the North Korean nuclear crisis. In this wise and witty talk he explains where we are today, how we got here, and where we're likely to go in the future.
    12/14/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Meth Fiefdoms, Rebel Hideouts, & Bomb-Scarred Party Towns of Southeast Asia, with Patrick Winn
    10/01/2018
    From the world's largest meth trade in Myanmar to "Pyongyang's dancing queens," "neon jihad," and much more, Bangkok-based author Patrick Winn takes us on a tour of the underbelly of Southeast Asia. The region's criminal underworld is valued at $100 billion and in the next decade it's going to hit $375 billion, bigger than many of these country's GDPs, he says. These stories need to be told.
    10/01/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Korea & the "Republic of Samsung" with Geoffrey Cain
    09/20/2018
    Korea expert Geoffrey Cain talks about his forthcoming book, "The Republic of Samsung," which reveals how the Samsung dynasty (father and son) are beyond the law and are treated as cult figures by their employees--rather like the leaders of North Korea. He also discusses the prospects for peace on the Korean peninsula--is Trump helping or hurting?--and the strange and sensational story behind the impeachment of President Park Geun-hye.
    09/20/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Helsinki, Singapore, & the Emerging Trump Doctrine
    08/16/2018
    From the unprecedented Trump-Kim meeting, to what some call a treasonous press conference in Finland, to growing tensions between America and its closest allies, as well as its adversaries, this has been a historic summer for international affairs. RAND Corporation's Ali Wyne unpacks these developments and looks at a potentially busy September for North Korea and the continuing schism between Trump and his top foreign policy advisers.
    08/16/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: A "Peace Regime" on the Korean Peninsula?
    07/12/2018
    In this new podcast series, we'll be connecting current events to Carnegie Council resources through conversations with our Senior Fellows. This week, Devin Stewart discusses how his essay defending the Singapore Summit holds up a month later. Plus, he and host Alex Woodson speak about Mike Pompeo's strange and unproductive trip to Pyongyang, what a "peace regime" could look like, and the prospects for a unified Korean Peninsula.
    07/12/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Asia's "Opinion Wars" with Historian Alexis Dudden
    07/11/2018
    As part of our new Information Warfare podcast series, University of Connecticut historian Alexis Dudden looks at the propaganda efforts coming out of Northeast Asia, with a focus on China's Confucius Institutes at American universities. Is China trying to spread its communist ideology through these centers or just teach its language to college students? Are the U.S. and Japan "guilty" of similar efforts?
    07/11/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • In Defense of the Trump-Kim Summit
    06/14/2018
    "As a long-time Asia watcher, I feel it's important to defend the value of the Singapore summit. The meeting has served to establish rapport between the U.S. and North Korean leaders and a more positive tone, reduce the chance of war, launch a framework for technical arms negotiations, and set the broad goal of peace on the Korean Peninsula. All unthinkable a few months ago."
    06/14/18Publications
  • The Impeachment of South Korean President Park Geun-hye
    06/05/2018
    This report explores the timeline and details of South Korean President Park Geun-hye's impeachment, and the aftermath that followed. Park Geun-hye's history begins with her father's military takeover of the South Korean government in 1961, the assassination of her mother and father, her handling and alleged mismanagement of the Sewol Ferry Disaster, and her ties to the Choi family.
    06/05/18Publications
  • Democracy Promotion in the Age of Trump
    05/22/2018
    In this panel Adrian Basora makes a strong case for democracy as not only promoting American values but also serving U.S. interests, while Maia Otarashvili gives a frightening overview of the rise of "illiberal values" (Viktor Orbán's phrase) in the Eurasia region. Basora and Otarashvili are co-editors of "Does Democracy Matter? The United States and Global Democracy Support" and Nikolas Gvosdev is one of the contributors.
    05/22/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Carnegie Council Announces Robert J. Myers Fund Recipients for 2018
    05/21/2018
    The Fund supports and promotes activities of the Carnegie Council network that embody Mr. Myers' vision of effective ethical inquiry rooted in local experiences and communities. This year 10 projects were chosen, located in Ethiopia, Djibouti, Ghana, India, Indonesia, Japan, Myanmar, Namibia, South Africa, and the United States.
    05/21/18NewsPress Releases
  • The Peacemakers: Leadership Lessons from Twentieth-Century Statesmanship, with Bruce Jentleson
    05/01/2018
    What are the qualities and conditions that enable people to become successful peacemakers? At a time when peace seems elusive and conflict endemic, Bruce Jentleson makes a forceful and inspiring case for the continued relevance of statesmanship and diplomacy and provides practical guidance to 21st-century leaders seeking lessons from some of history's most accomplished negotiators, activists, and trailblazers.
    05/01/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Reading List and Discussion Questions on President Park's Impeachment in South Korea
    05/01/2018
    Six weeks is all the time it took for President Park Geun-hye to be impeached and only a few months more before being ousted from the Blue House and charged with bribery and abuse of presidential power. This 10.5-week reading list with discussion questions examines what happened and why.
    05/01/18EducationLesson Plan IdeasCourse Syllabi
  • On Grand Strategy, with John Lewis Gaddis
    04/13/2018
    Are there such things as timeless principles of grand strategy? If so, are they always the same across epochs and cultures? What can we learn from reading the classics, such as Thucydides, Sun Tzu, and Clausewitz? "The fox knows many things, but the hedgehog knows one big thing," according to Isaiah Berlin. Which type makes better strategists, or do you need to be a bit of both? John Lewis Gaddis has some wise and thoughtful answers.
    04/13/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts

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