• Vaccine Ethics: What Are We Learning from COVID-19?
    12/07/2020
    As the race for COVID–19 vaccines enters its next stage, we are faced with broad ethical challenges, along with specific questions of principle and practice. How should countries and the global community plan for distribution and allocation? What can and should be done to bolster trust in the vaccines? Public health experts Ruth Faden, Nicole Hassoun, Clive Meanwell, and Reed Tuckson discuss these questions and much more in this webinar moderated by Jeffrey Kahn, director of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics.
    12/07/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Doorstep: The World Waits for the Next U.S. President, with Professor Tom Nichols
    11/05/2020
    As America waits for counts to come in from the last handful of swing states and the Trump campaign files lawsuits, leaders around the world are anxiously watching. What do rivals like China and Russia expect? What do allies hope for from a potential Biden presidency? In this episode of the "The Doorstep," U.S. Naval War College's Professor Tom Nichols joins the hosts to discuss the election from a historical and international perspective and the ways that Gen Z can be more influential in foreign affairs.
    11/05/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Democratic Community: A Path for U.S. Engagement? with Ash Jain
    10/15/2020
    Polling data suggests that the American public is not in favor of isolationism, but wants to adjust the terms of U.S. engagement. In this webinar, the Atlantic Council's Ash Jain and Senior Fellows Nikolas Gvosdev and Tatiana Serafin assess the “democratic community” approach. Will deepening cooperation with an alliance of democracies be the way forward?
    10/15/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Doorstep: Spy Games & Trump's Health, Pence vs. Harris, & Europe's Refugee Crisis, with Politico's Nahal Toosi
    10/09/2020
    In the second episode of "The Doorstep" hosts Tatiana Serafin and Nikolas Gvosdev discuss the counterintelligence aspect of President Trump's health crisis, the main street USA reverberations of the seemingly far away conflict in Nagorno-Karabakh, the vice presidential debate and American leadership, and what lessons the U.S. can learn from Europe's refugee crisis. Nahal Toosi, foreign affairs correspondent for "Politico," joins the hosts for this episode to discuss what foreign policy might look like in 2021 and beyond.
    10/09/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Is Great Power Competition Ethical?
    10/07/2020
    Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev discusses ethics in the context of great power competition. What can we learn from history about the role that ethics play in relations between nation-states?
    10/07/20Publications
  • Great Power Competition: What Role Does It Play in the 2020 Presidential Race? with Ali Wyne
    09/29/2020
    Foreign policy may not be in the headlines when it comes to Biden vs. Trump, but U.S-China competition and questions about America's role in the world are deeply tied in to "front-page" topics like the pandemic, the economy, and political ideology. In a talk moderated by Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev, the Atlantic Council's Ali Wyne discusses how "great power competition" is shaping the 2020 election.
    09/29/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Searching for a Post-Pandemic Order
    09/25/2020
    In this blog post, Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev reflects on his recent webinar with Ali Wyne of the Atlantic Council. What will the role of the United States be in the "post-pandemic order"? Will the international response to COVID-19, as well as other environmental considerations, lead to a new "affirmative agenda" for U.S. foreign policy?
    09/25/20Publications
  • The Last Million: Europe's Displaced Persons from World War to Cold War, with David Nasaw
    09/23/2020
    The aftershocks of World War II did not end with German capitulation in May 1945. Millions were displaced, including concentration camp survivors, POWs, slave laborers, political prisoners, and Nazi collaborators. Many eventually returned home, but "the lost million" did not. Author David Nasaw and Carnegie Council President Joel Rosenthal discuss this forgotten chapter in history and its relevance to today.
    09/23/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Ethical Dilemmas in Ensuring Human Security
    07/28/2020
    In this blog post, Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev reflects on his recent "Human Security is National Security in a Time of Pandemic" webinar with Derek Reveron. What are the ethical considerations for policymakers that involve real human security trade-offs?
    07/28/20Publications
  • Human Security is National Security in a Time of Pandemic, with Derek Reveron
    07/27/2020
    Professor Derek Reveron, chair of the U.S. Naval War College's National Security Affairs Department, discusses how subnational and transnational forces--namely, the COVID-19 pandemic--intersect with national security in this conversation with Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev. What are the implications for how politicians and policymakers conceptualize American foreign and defense policy in the 2020s? How should the U.S. reconsider the ways it looks at national security?
    07/27/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Ethics & International Affairs Volume 34.2 (Summer 2020)
    07/09/2020
    The highlight of the Summer 2020 issue of "Ethics & International Affairs" is a roundtable organized by Daniel R. Brunstetter on limited strikes and the associated ethical, legal, and strategic concerns. The collection contains contributions from Daniel R. Brunstetter, Wendy Pearlman, Jean-Baptiste Jeangène Vilmer, Danielle L. Lupton, and Eric A. Heinze and Rhiannon Neilsen.
    07/09/20Publications
  • Just Out: "Ethics & International Affairs" Summer 2020 Issue
    07/09/2020
    The highlight of the Summer 2020 issue of "Ethics & International Affairs" is a roundtable organized by Daniel R. Brunstetter on limited strikes and the associated ethical, legal, and strategic concerns. The collection contains contributions from Daniel R. Brunstetter, Wendy Pearlman, Jean-Baptiste Jeangène Vilmer, Danielle L. Lupton, and Eric A. Heinze and Rhiannon Neilsen.
    07/09/20NewsPress Releases
  • Great Power Populism, COVID-19, & Missing Leadership, with Damjan Krnjević Mišković & Nikolas Gvosdev
    05/12/2020
    What is "great power populism" and what does it mean during the pandemic? Are we heading towards another global conflict? And are there any leaders who can inspire the "international community" during a crisis? ADA University's Damjan Krnjević Mišković and Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev share their thoughts on the causes and characteristics of the ongoing "nervous breakdown" in the international system.
    05/12/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Fractured Globalization & Dissolving Ethics, with Nikolas Gvosdev
    04/17/2020
    If global interconnections begin to fray in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, what happens to the ethical underpinnings of international relations? Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev and Carnegie Council President Joel Rosenthal discuss this important question and much more as solidarity begins to weaken among European Union and NATO states.
    04/17/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Hungary and the Values Test
    03/31/2020
    In the wake of the Hungarian parliament's vote to allow the executive to rule by decree, Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev reflects on the call by some to expel Hungary from the North Atlantic Treaty Organization--on the grounds that the country no longer upholds the liberal-democratic values that should form the basis of the security association.
    03/31/20Publications
  • As Biden Stalls, Is the "Restorationist" Narrative Losing Ground?
    02/07/2020
    U.S. Global Engagement Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev notes that former Vice President Joe Biden is, in foreign policy terms, most associated with a "restorationist" approach. How does this differentiate from other candidates? What approach will resonate most with voters?
    02/07/20Publications
  • Winners of Carnegie Council's International Student Essay Contest 2019 - Internet Responsibility
    01/31/2020
    Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs is pleased to announce the winners of its 2019 International Student Essay Contest. Winners come from France/Italy, Pakistan, Russia, South Korea, and the United States.
    01/31/20NewsPress Releases
  • In Favor of the Public Interest: Social Media Should be Regulated
    01/31/2020
    "The sheer size of the social media market in news delivery, as well as the numerous instances of social media being used for harmful ends, are powerful reasons why the freedom of social media must be limited with carefully crafted, democratically discussed regulations."
    01/31/20Publications
  • IF Internet — THEN Free
    01/31/2020
    This essay written by Evgeny Nedoborskiy is the first prize winner of the undergraduate category in the 2019 student essay contest. If we want to preserve the benefits of an open internet, he writes, "then it is our ethical responsibility to oppose any extensive regulation of it."
    01/31/20Publications
  • Internet Regulation: The Responsibility of the People
    01/31/2020
    This essay written by Justin Oh is the second prize winner of the high school category in the 2019 student essay contest. What have data and privacy breaches taught us about regulating the internet? How can users put economic pressure on companies to enforce the privacy protections they seek?
    01/31/20Publications

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