• Searching for a Post-Pandemic Order
    09/25/2020
    In this blog post, Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev reflects on his recent webinar with Ali Wyne of the Atlantic Council. What will the role of the United States be in the "post-pandemic order"? Will the international response to COVID-19, as well as other environmental considerations, lead to a new "affirmative agenda" for U.S. foreign policy?
    09/25/20Publications
  • Ethical Dilemmas in Ensuring Human Security
    07/28/2020
    In this blog post, Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev reflects on his recent "Human Security is National Security in a Time of Pandemic" webinar with Derek Reveron. What are the ethical considerations for policymakers that involve real human security trade-offs?
    07/28/20Publications
  • Human Security is National Security in a Time of Pandemic, with Derek Reveron
    07/27/2020
    Professor Derek Reveron, chair of the U.S. Naval War College's National Security Affairs Department, discusses how subnational and transnational forces--namely, the COVID-19 pandemic--intersect with national security in this conversation with Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev. What are the implications for how politicians and policymakers conceptualize American foreign and defense policy in the 2020s? How should the U.S. reconsider the ways it looks at national security?
    07/27/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Ethics & International Affairs Volume 34.2 (Summer 2020)
    07/09/2020
    The highlight of the Summer 2020 issue of "Ethics & International Affairs" is a roundtable organized by Daniel R. Brunstetter on limited strikes and the associated ethical, legal, and strategic concerns. The collection contains contributions from Daniel R. Brunstetter, Wendy Pearlman, Jean-Baptiste Jeangène Vilmer, Danielle L. Lupton, and Eric A. Heinze and Rhiannon Neilsen.
    07/09/20Publications
  • Just Out: "Ethics & International Affairs" Summer 2020 Issue
    07/09/2020
    The highlight of the Summer 2020 issue of "Ethics & International Affairs" is a roundtable organized by Daniel R. Brunstetter on limited strikes and the associated ethical, legal, and strategic concerns. The collection contains contributions from Daniel R. Brunstetter, Wendy Pearlman, Jean-Baptiste Jeangène Vilmer, Danielle L. Lupton, and Eric A. Heinze and Rhiannon Neilsen.
    07/09/20NewsPress Releases
  • Great Power Populism, COVID-19, & Missing Leadership, with Damjan Krnjević Mišković & Nikolas Gvosdev
    05/12/2020
    What is "great power populism" and what does it mean during the pandemic? Are we heading towards another global conflict? And are there any leaders who can inspire the "international community" during a crisis? ADA University's Damjan Krnjević Mišković and Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev share their thoughts on the causes and characteristics of the ongoing "nervous breakdown" in the international system.
    05/12/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Fractured Globalization & Dissolving Ethics, with Nikolas Gvosdev
    04/17/2020
    If global interconnections begin to fray in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, what happens to the ethical underpinnings of international relations? Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev and Carnegie Council President Joel Rosenthal discuss this important question and much more as solidarity begins to weaken among European Union and NATO states.
    04/17/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Hungary and the Values Test
    03/31/2020
    In the wake of the Hungarian parliament's vote to allow the executive to rule by decree, Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev reflects on the call by some to expel Hungary from the North Atlantic Treaty Organization--on the grounds that the country no longer upholds the liberal-democratic values that should form the basis of the security association.
    03/31/20Publications
  • As Biden Stalls, Is the "Restorationist" Narrative Losing Ground?
    02/07/2020
    U.S. Global Engagement Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev notes that former Vice President Joe Biden is, in foreign policy terms, most associated with a "restorationist" approach. How does this differentiate from other candidates? What approach will resonate most with voters?
    02/07/20Publications
  • Winners of Carnegie Council's International Student Essay Contest 2019 - Internet Responsibility
    01/31/2020
    Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs is pleased to announce the winners of its 2019 International Student Essay Contest. Winners come from France/Italy, Pakistan, Russia, South Korea, and the United States.
    01/31/20NewsPress Releases
  • In Favor of the Public Interest: Social Media Should be Regulated
    01/31/2020
    "The sheer size of the social media market in news delivery, as well as the numerous instances of social media being used for harmful ends, are powerful reasons why the freedom of social media must be limited with carefully crafted, democratically discussed regulations."
    01/31/20Publications
  • IF Internet — THEN Free
    01/31/2020
    This essay written by Evgeny Nedoborskiy is the first prize winner of the undergraduate category in the 2019 student essay contest. If we want to preserve the benefits of an open internet, he writes, "then it is our ethical responsibility to oppose any extensive regulation of it."
    01/31/20Publications
  • Internet Regulation: The Responsibility of the People
    01/31/2020
    This essay written by Justin Oh is the second prize winner of the high school category in the 2019 student essay contest. What have data and privacy breaches taught us about regulating the internet? How can users put economic pressure on companies to enforce the privacy protections they seek?
    01/31/20Publications
  • Gene Editing: Overview, Ethics, & the Near Future, with Robert Klitzman
    11/20/2019
    In the first in a series of podcasts on gene editing, Columbia's Dr. Robert Klitzman provides an overview of the technology, ethical and governance issues, and where it could all go in the near future. Plus he explains why the birth of genetically engineered twins in China last year was a "seismic" event. How could gene editing lead to more inequality? What could be some of unintended consequences?
    11/20/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • AI in the Arctic: Future Opportunities & Ethical Concerns, with Fritz Allhoff
    11/13/2019
    How can artificial intelligence improve food security, medicine, and infrastructure in Arctic communities? What are some logistical, ethical, and governance challenges? Western Michigan's Professor Fritz Allhoff details the future of technology in this extreme environment, which is being made more accessible because of climate change. Plus he shares his thoughts on some open philosophical questions surrounding AI.
    11/13/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Carnegie New Leaders Podcast: The Future of Space Acquisition & Threats, with Maj. Gen. Nina M. Armagno
    11/06/2019
    In conversation with intelligence analyst Amelia M. Wolf, Major General Nina M. Armagno of the U.S. Air Force discusses her role as director of Space Programs in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Acquisition at the Department of Defense. How has space acquisition shifted as threats have evolved? What would a future U.S. Space Force look like?
    11/06/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Individual & the Collective, Politics, & the UN, with Jean-Marie Guéhenno
    10/21/2019
    Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Jean-Marie Guéhenno, former head of United Nations peacekeeping operations, discusses the tensions between the individual and the collective in a world filled with political tension, pervasive surveillance, and fear of risk. What is the role of the UN in this environment? How can we avoid the violent upheavals that marked other transitional phases in humanity?
    10/21/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • A Russian Take on the Kurds and U.S. Foreign Policy
    10/18/2019
    A Russian defense news site declared the United States an "unreliable ally" after the withdrawal of American troops from Northern Syria. Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev connects this characterization to the need for leaders to connect a specific policy action to a larger, understandable narrative for the American public.
    10/18/19Publications
  • The End of the U.S.-Taliban Talks? with Jonathan Cristol
    09/18/2019
    Despite progress over the last year, Donald Trump effectively ended the latest round of U.S.-Taliban negotiations with a tweet earlier this month. Will talks continue in a more understated way? Does this change anything on the ground in Afghanistan? And what is the Taliban doing in Moscow? Jonathan Cristol, author of "The United States and the Taliban before and after 9/11," discusses all this and more.
    09/18/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Ethics of Trade with China and Authoritarian Upgrading
    08/23/2019
    Increased foreign investment and engagement is producing, not democratization, but "authoritarian upgrading," where selected reforms are designed to legitimize a softer authoritarianism. This presents an ethical dilemma for international trade. What direction will China, Uzbekistan, Russia, and other "upgraded authoritarian" states evolve towards in the coming decade?
    08/23/19Publications

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