• The Model International Mobility Convention, with Michael Doyle
    09/04/2019
    In this timely talk, SIPA's Professor Michael Doyle details the Model International Mobility Convention, a "hypothetical ideal convention" developed to define a "comprehensive and coherent" set of regulations for the movement of people across borders. Why was it so important to account for tourists alongside refugees and migrant workers? How does this document represent a "realistic utopia"?
    09/04/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Venezuelan Refugees & Immigration Policies, with Kavitha Rajagopalan
    04/02/2019
    With millions of Venezuelans fleeing the Maduro regime, what are the effects on Latin America and the Caribbean? What could or should the United States do? Is it helpful to compare this situation to the Syrian refugee crisis? Senior Fellow Kavitha Rajagopalan discusses immigration policies and asylum law in the context of Venezuela's economic collapse.
    04/02/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The New Rules of War: Victory in the Age of Durable Disorder, with Sean McFate
    03/19/2019
    "Nobody fights conventionally except for us anymore, yet we're sinking a big bulk, perhaps the majority of our defense dollars, into preparing for another conventional war, which is the very definition of insanity," declares national security strategist and former paratrooper Sean McFate. The U.S. needs to recognize that we're living in an age of "durable disorder"--a time of persistent, smoldering conflicts--and the old rules no longer apply.
    03/19/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Kerch and San Ysidro
    11/27/2018
    What do the events in the Kerch Straits and on the U.S.-Mexico border have in common? In a world that may be shrinking due to technology but is still formally divided into sovereign nation-states, the lines drawn on maps still matter—and, whether on the basis of fear (of others), honor (defending rights) or interest (securing what we have against others), as the Greek historian Thucydides rightly observed, conflict will still ensue.
    11/27/18Publications
  • Internet Trolls in the U.S. and Mexico, with Saiph Savage
    11/14/2018
    Professor Saiph Savage is an activist scholar and technology expert who is using large-scale data to study the sophisticated ways in which trolls target certain groups and bombard them with misinformation--for example U.S. Latinos were targeted in the 2018 midterm elections as were Mexicans in their 2018 presidential election. But her message is one of hope. In Mexico, citizens eventually saw through misinformation campaigns and others can too.
    11/14/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Education for Peace: The Living Legacy of the First World War
    11/07/2018
    Four Fellows from Carnegie Council's "The Living Legacy of WWI" project present their research on different aspects of the war--counterterrorism, airpower, chemical warfare, and Latin America--and its long-term impacts. The panel was part of the Carnegie Peacebuilding Conversations, a three-day program at the Peace Palace in The Hague, Netherlands, presented in cooperation with Carnegie institutions worldwide and other partners.
    11/07/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Truth & Identity Politics, with Alexander Görlach
    08/23/2018
    Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Alexander Görlach and host Alex Woodson speak about identity politics in the United States and Europe from their different perspectives. They also discuss how religion and the recent Mexican election fits in to these narratives.
    08/23/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • LGBT Rights & International Affairs in Mexico, with Genaro Lozano
    06/19/2018
    Professor Genaro Lozano of Ibero-American University in Mexico City is also a TV presenter, columnist, and LGBT activist. He discusses the long history and current "fragmented scenario" of LGBT rights in Mexico and other Latin American countries and also explores U.S.-Mexico relations, especially since Trump's election. Meanwhile Mexico is not standing still. It has free trade agreements with the EU and others, and China may be next.
    06/19/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • "Samuel Huntington ignored Latin America as part of the West," says Homero Aridjis
    06/05/2018
    For Homero Aridjis, a distinguished Mexican poet, author, activist, and diplomat, "the West" means countries that follow Greco-Latin culture--not Anglo-Saxon culture, he says pointedly. So why is Latin America ignored? Centuries ago, the Spaniards brought architecture, philosophy, religion, art, and literature to Latin America. In many ways these nations are keeping Western culture alive, he argues, as Europeans lose their Western identity.
    06/05/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Vanishing Frontiers: The Forces Driving Mexico and the U.S. Together, with Andrew Selee
    06/01/2018
    "Mexico is very present in our daily lives, sometimes even in ways we don't realize," says Andrew Selee. Did you know, for example, that some of America's most famous baked goods, such as Sara Lee, are owned by a Mexican company and made in Pennsylvania? From manufacturing and trade to film, food, and sports, plus the large number of Americans with Mexican heritage, the economies and cultures of Mexico and the U.S. are woven tightly together.
    06/01/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Living Legacy of WWI: Forgotten Aspects of the Western Hemisphere & WWI, with Richard Millett
    05/15/2018
    "Unknown to the rest of America, we had one regiment of Puerto Ricans in Puerto Rico which was totally integrated. The rest of the military was segregated, and the Puerto Rican regiment was integrated." Military historian Richard Millett discusses some surprising and neglected aspects of the Hispanic experience in World War I, along with the war's impact on the United States' relationship with its Latin American allies.
    05/15/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Top Risks and Ethical Decisions 2018 with Eurasia Group's Ian Bremmer
    01/12/2018
    Probably the most dangerous geopolitical environment in decades-China, AI, Trump, end of Pax Americana--yes, it's very bad. But all these challenges energize political scientist Ian Bremmer to do his best work! Don't miss this great talk.
    01/12/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Recalibrating the U.S. Strategy for the War on Drugs
    07/17/2017
    With Mexico in mind, it's time the U.S. recalibrated its strategy for the decades-long War on Drugs. "A policy that addresses the violent threat but which also reduces the source demand for the drugs stands the best chance of reducing the human toll being paid by both countries," writes Major Vincent Dueñas.
    07/17/17Publications
  • Top Risks and Ethical Decisions 2017
    01/10/2017
    The world is entering a geopolitical recession, i.e. an unwinding of the old global order, says political scientist Ian Bremmer, in his grimmest forecast ever. Topics include the potential challenges from a Trump administration, President Obama's legacy of a more fractured world, human rights in the Middle East, and the fate of liberalism.
    01/10/17MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Women's Rights are Human Rights: Global Challenges to Reproductive Health
    12/21/2016
    How will the Trump presidency affect women's rights, not only in the U.S. but around the world? Will the Sustainable Development Goals really succeed in improving women's health and reducing gender inequalities? Emotions run high on these issues. How can we find common ground? Don't miss this important discussion.
    12/21/16MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Foreign Affairs & U.S. History Materials, Curated for High School Teachers by a Teacher
    08/22/2016
    The new Worksheets & Excerpts section of Carnegie Council's online educational resources includes material useful for comparative government, world history, and U.S. history courses, and is specially designed for high school teachers.
    08/22/16NewsPress Releases
  • Strangers in Strange Lands: Migration
    08/08/2016
    In 2015, the number of international migrants worldwide—people residing in a country other than their country of birth—reached a record-breaking 244 million. And 65.3 million of these migrants were refugees, the largest number since World War II. We present a collection of useful resources on the ethical and practical challenges of migration.
    08/08/16PublicationsResource Picks
  • Migrant Deaths Worldwide
    06/08/2015
    There is no going back to a world in which migration can be prevented. The only solution to the global crisis of migrant deaths is to merge humanitarian efforts to aid and rescue migrants with coordinated, cooperative efforts to open safe, long-term migration channels throughout regions, and even the world.
    06/08/15Publications
  • The Central American Child Emigration Crisis: Facts, Figures, and Root Causes
    09/24/2014
    Beginning in early 2014, news reports noted the rising number of unaccompanied minors attempting to cross the U.S. border with Mexico. Soon, it was described as a crisis. What made this flow of migrants a crisis? Who are these unaccompanied minors? What caused their migration? Did the United States play a role in it?
    09/24/14Publications
  • Ethics Matter: Top Risks and Ethical Decisions 2014 with Ian Bremmer
    01/22/2014
    So what should we look out for in 2014? "The economic risks are receding. The geopolitical risks are becoming more important," says political risk guru Ian Bremmer. Don't miss this entertaining but fact-filled talk for insights on global affairs, from U.S. foreign policy, to the Middle East, Asia, Russia, Europe, and emerging markets.
    01/22/14MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts

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