• Fighting ISIS Online, with Asha Castleberry-Hernandez
    11/08/2019
    National security expert Asha Castleberry-Hernandez discusses what "ISIS 2.0" means and how the terrorist group has used social media to recruit and spread its message. How has its strategy changed since the death of its leader Abur Bakr al-Baghdadi? What can the U.S. military, Congress, and executive branch do better to fight the group online?
    11/08/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Ill Winds: Saving Democracy from Russian Rage, Chinese Ambition, and American Complacency, with Larry Diamond
    06/20/2019
    Larry Diamond's core argument is stark: the defense and advancement of democratic ideals relies on U.S. global leadership. If the U.S. does not reclaim its traditional place as the keystone of democracy, today's authoritarian trend could become a tsunami that could provide an opening for Vladimir Putin, Xi Jinping, and their admirers to turn the 21st century into a dark time of surging authoritarianism.
    06/20/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Iran Tensions & Secretary Shanahan, with Asha Castleberry
    05/30/2019
    National security expert and U.S. Army veteran Asha Castleberry breaks down the rising tensions with Iran and John Bolton's influence at the White House. She and host Alex Woodson also discuss the pluses and minuses of having former Boeing executive Patrick Shanahan in charge at the Department of Defense and she gives advice on how to figure out who or what to believe in this chaotic political environment.
    05/30/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Immigration: A National Security Imperative
    05/13/2019
    "The U.S. intelligence community is dependent on immigration to maintain language and cultural skills that protect American lives every day," writes military veteran Philip Caruso. "Although the immigration policy debate is often portrayed as a clash of American values, human rights, and pragmatic challenges, any solution must also recognize rational and pragmatic immigration as a national security imperative."
    05/13/19Publications
  • The Enduring False Promise of Preventive War, with Scott A. Silverstone
    02/26/2019
    Does preventive war really work? "In the vast majority of cases historically, what we see is the country that thought it was saving itself from a greater danger in the future actually creates this greater danger because you generate a level of hostility, a deepening rivalry, and a desire for revenge that comes back to haunt them," says Scott Silverstone. His advice: Hesitate. Before taking action, think through this "preventive war paradox."
    02/26/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: U.S. Defense Policy After Mattis, with Asha Castleberry
    01/09/2019
    National security expert and U.S. Army veteran Asha Castleberry makes sense of a busy and seemingly chaotic time for the Department of Defense in the wake of Secretary Mattis' departure. What should think about Trump's plans in Syria and Afghanistan? How is the U.S. planning to counter China in Africa? And has John Bolton actually been a moderating influence?
    01/09/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Future of U.S. National Security, with Derek Reveron
    10/10/2018
    "Is it still fair to say there are continuities in foreign policy two years into the Trump administration? I'm going to say yes, and I'll offer some evidence," declares Derek S. Reveron of the U.S. Naval War College and Harvard Kennedy School. Don't miss this expert analysis of America's role in the world.
    10/10/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Making Foreign Policy Relevant Again, with Asha Castleberry & Ali Wyne
    09/25/2018
    Has a gap opened up between the U.S. national security community and the general public over foreign policy? If so, why? How can we close it? Moderated by Nikolas Gvosdev, this panel with foreign policy experts Asha Castleberry and Ali Wyne is part of a larger effort by Carnegie Council's U.S. Global Engagement Program to examine drivers in U.S. politics pushing the United States to disengage from international affairs.
    09/25/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Back to School with Carnegie Council's Online Lessons, Worksheets, Primary Sources, and Activities
    08/29/2018
    With the new school year in mind Carnegie Council has added timely new high school and undergraduate resources to its extensive online Education Section. These include two new sections, "Thinking Democratically" and "Moral Leadership and the Environment," plus new materials in the "Worksheets and Excerpts on History and Government" section.
    08/29/18NewsPress Releases
  • The Rise and Fall (and Rise) of Chemical Weapons
    08/07/2018
    "Chemical weapons have been used in almost every decade since their advent just over a century ago. They are not a specter, like nuclear weapons. We know their effects, and how numerous states have employed them, and how they might do so in the future. In fact, after a few decades of relative non-use, chemical-weapons attacks have again exploded onto the scene--as a weapon of war, terror, and as a tool of state assassination."
    08/07/18Publications
  • Restoring Trust: How Can the American Public Regain its Confidence in its National Security Apparatus?
    06/13/2018
    There is a huge divide in the way Americans assess U.S. foreign policy. Take for example, the June G7 meeting, which ended in a clash between Trump and some of America's closest allies: Some say it was a disaster; others say Trump did the right thing. Where do we go from here to restore trust in expertise and government? Don't miss this fascinating conversation with two leading commentators, Colin Dueck and Kori Schake.
    06/13/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Why Ethics Matter in International Affairs
    05/31/2018
    How can you ensure that ethics are a core component, not only of an international affairs education, but of graduates' performance once they go out in the field? In this event for students and alumni of the Elliott School of International Affairs, the School's Dean Brigety and Professors Nolan and Kojm, along with Carnegie Council President Rosenthal, discuss the thorny issues of ethics, leadership, and practice in international relations.
    05/31/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Living Legacy of WWI: Counterterrorism Strategies in the War's Aftermath, with Mary Barton
    05/29/2018
    "It is important to look at terrorism from a historical perspective, to understand where the term came from and to not see it as being tied to any one group for any specific cause," says Mary Barton, a contract historian with the Office of the Secretary of Defense Historical Office, "because left-wing groups have used terrorist tactics; right-wing groups have used terrorist tactics; different religious extremists have used terrorist tactics,"
    05/29/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Democracy Promotion in the Age of Trump
    05/22/2018
    In this panel Adrian Basora makes a strong case for democracy as not only promoting American values but also serving U.S. interests, while Maia Otarashvili gives a frightening overview of the rise of "illiberal values" (Viktor Orbán's phrase) in the Eurasia region. Basora and Otarashvili are co-editors of "Does Democracy Matter? The United States and Global Democracy Support" and Nikolas Gvosdev is one of the contributors.
    05/22/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Crime and Global Justice: The Dynamics of International Punishment, with Daniele Archibugi
    05/07/2018
    Are we witnessing a new era of cosmopolitan justice or are the old principles of victors' justice still in play? Economic and political theorist Daniele Archibugi discusses his new book, "Crime and Global Justice," which examines the history of global criminal justice and presents five case studies: Augusto Pinochet, Slobodan Milošević, Radovan Karadžić, Saddam Hussein, and Omar al-Basheer.
    05/07/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Living Legacy of WWI: Chemical Weapons from the Great War to Syria, with Zach Dorfman
    05/01/2018
    "What you stopped seeing after World War I was great power conflict involving chemical weapons, and what you started seeing was asymmetric conflicts or regional conflicts that involved chemical weapons. That actually disturbed me even more because what I started realizing was that as time went on the weaker you were, the more likely that another state would use chemical weapons against you or your people."
    05/01/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Return of Marco Polo's World, with Robert D. Kaplan
    03/16/2018
    If you wish to understand the depth and breadth of the geographical, historical, technological, and political forces that are shaping our world, there is no better guide than Robert Kaplan. Using Marco Polo's journey as "a geographical framing device for Eurasia today," he examines China's ambitious One Belt One Road project, dissecting China's imperial dream and its multiple, under-reported objectives.
    03/16/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Political Tribes: Group Instinct and the Fate of Nations, with Amy Chua
    03/07/2018
    "The United States today is starting to display destructive political dynamics much more typically associated with developing countries: ethno-nationalist movements, the erosion of trust in our institutions and electoral outcomes, and above all, the transformation of democracy into an engine of zero-sum political tribalism."
    03/07/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Iran: A Modern History, with Abbas Amanat
    01/29/2018
    There are few countries in the world that are more misrepresented in the West than Iran. By exploring the imperial rivalries that played out there, the dynastic changes and revolutions, the population explosion, the role of religion, and Iran's relations with other nations in the Middle East, Abbas Amanat provides a context that helps us to demystify present-day Iran, one of the most powerful nations in the Middle East.
    01/29/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Deciphering the Middle East and Trump's National Security Stategy, with Asha Castleberry
    01/10/2018
    Asha Castleberry, Fordham professor and U.S. Army veteran, describes her "mixed reaction" to Trump's National Security Strategy--touching on China and Russia, cybersecurity, and climate change--and what effect it will actually have on the military's operations. Plus, she details an increasingly complicated Middle East, with the Saudi crown prince on a warpath and a dangerous transitional period in Syria and Iraq after major victories against ISIS.
    01/10/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts

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