• Just War, Unjust Soldiers, & American Public Opinion, with Scott D. Sagan
    01/27/2020
    Do soldiers fighting for a "just cause" have more rights than soldiers fighting on the other side? In this interview following up on an "Ethics & International Affairs" article, Stanford's Professor Scott D. Sagan discusses the results of a study he conducted with Dartmouth's Professor Benjamin A. Valentino on how Americans think about this profound question.
    01/27/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Suleimani Is Dead, but Diplomacy Shouldn't Be
    01/08/2020
    Carnegie Council fellow and Pacific Delegate Philip Caruso advocates for the value of diplomacy in the aftermath of the U.S. killing Iran's general Qassem Suleimani. "Iran cannot win a war against the United States, nor can the United States afford to fight one," he argues. This article was originally published in "Foreign Policy" and is posted here with kind permission.
    01/08/20Publications
  • Soleimani and the Democratic Primary Electorate
    01/06/2020
    In the aftermath of the U.S. drone strike on the commander of Iran's Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps, General Qassem Soleimani, senior fellow Nikolas Gvosdev studies the responses of the Democratic primary candidates. To what degree and scope do they see America's involvement and engagement in the world?
    01/06/20Publications
  • Vox Populi, Eurasia Group Foundation, and Narratives
    12/10/2019
    The Eurasia Group Foundation (EGF) has released its report on public attitudes towards U.S. foreign policy. Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev notes that, like the project on U.S. Global Engagement at the Carnegie Council, EGF is attempting to get at the twin issues of "the chasm which exists between the interests and concerns of foreign policy elites and those of ordinary citizens" and "the reasons why Americans are increasingly disenfranchised from foreign policy decisions being made in Washington."
    12/10/19Publications
  • The End of the U.S.-Taliban Talks? with Jonathan Cristol
    09/18/2019
    Despite progress over the last year, Donald Trump effectively ended the latest round of U.S.-Taliban negotiations with a tweet earlier this month. Will talks continue in a more understated way? Does this change anything on the ground in Afghanistan? And what is the Taliban doing in Moscow? Jonathan Cristol, author of "The United States and the Taliban before and after 9/11," discusses all this and more.
    09/18/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Candidates, Calculus, and the Iran Crisis
    09/18/2019
    In choosing whether and how to respond to the attack on Saudi Arabian oil refineries, what is the calculus for determining action? Should the United States maintain its status as the guarantor of the Persian Gulf, protecting the security and integrity of the international energy system? What do the 2020 candidates think?
    09/18/19Publications
  • A New Era of Cyberwarfare, with Arun Vishwanath
    07/23/2019
    When the United States launched a massive cyberattack against Iran last month, it heralded "a new age of Internet warfare," says cybersecurity expert Arun Vishwanath. How could cyber-based conflicts change the nature of the Internet? Why is the U.S. especially vulnerable to these threats? And what would a "digital Geneva Convention" look like?
    07/23/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Iran Tensions & Secretary Shanahan, with Asha Castleberry
    05/30/2019
    National security expert and U.S. Army veteran Asha Castleberry breaks down the rising tensions with Iran and John Bolton's influence at the White House. She and host Alex Woodson also discuss the pluses and minuses of having former Boeing executive Patrick Shanahan in charge at the Department of Defense and she gives advice on how to figure out who or what to believe in this chaotic political environment.
    05/30/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: The Mueller Report & U.S. Foreign Policy, with Jonathan Cristol
    05/21/2019
    A lot of the talk about the Mueller Report has focused on its political and legal implications, but how will it affect U.S. foreign policy? Adelphi College's Jonathan Cristol discusses the reactions of allies and adversaries to Trump's passivity in the face of massive Russian interference in the U.S. election and congressional inaction and public apathy concerning presidential corruption. Plus, he details recent U.S. policy moves on Iran and the significance of NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg's speech to U.S. Congress.
    05/21/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Zach Dorfman Wins Gerald R. Ford Journalism Prize for Distinguished Reporting on National Defense
    05/15/2019
    Zach Dorfman and Jenna McLaughlin received the Prize for Distinguished Reporting on National Defense in recognition of their reporting about a security compromise within a key intelligence communications system, which detailed the immense human, technical, and resource costs of failure while maintaining the integrity of efforts to close vulnerabilities.
    05/15/19NewsPress Releases
  • The New Rules of War: Victory in the Age of Durable Disorder, with Sean McFate
    03/19/2019
    "Nobody fights conventionally except for us anymore, yet we're sinking a big bulk, perhaps the majority of our defense dollars, into preparing for another conventional war, which is the very definition of insanity," declares national security strategist and former paratrooper Sean McFate. The U.S. needs to recognize that we're living in an age of "durable disorder"--a time of persistent, smoldering conflicts--and the old rules no longer apply.
    03/19/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Enduring False Promise of Preventive War, with Scott A. Silverstone
    02/26/2019
    Does preventive war really work? "In the vast majority of cases historically, what we see is the country that thought it was saving itself from a greater danger in the future actually creates this greater danger because you generate a level of hostility, a deepening rivalry, and a desire for revenge that comes back to haunt them," says Scott Silverstone. His advice: Hesitate. Before taking action, think through this "preventive war paradox."
    02/26/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: The U.S.-Taliban Negotiations, with Jonathan Cristol
    02/21/2019
    Jonathan Cristol, author of "The United States and Taliban before and after 9/11," discusses the status of the latest talks between the U.S. government and the Taliban, in an effort to end the decades-long war in Afghanistan. Are women's rights being addressed? Are neighboring countries' interests being taken into account? And can we trust the Trump administration in this tense geopolitical environment?
    02/21/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Perfect Weapon: War, Sabotage, and Fear in the Cyber Age, with David Sanger
    01/14/2019
    From the U.S. operation against Iran's nuclear enrichment plant, to Chinese theft of personal data, North Korea's financially motivated attacks on American companies, or Russia's interference in the 2016 election, cyberweapons have become the weapon of choice for democracies, dictators, and terrorists. "New York Times" national security correspondent David Sanger explains how and why cyberattacks are now the number one security threat.
    01/14/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Refining Strategic Autonomy: A Call for European Grand Strategy
    12/05/2018
    Europe has come to realize that the United States is no longer the stalwart ally of the Cold War era. With the resurgence of China, the return of Russia, the retreat of the United States, and the rise of the rest, Europe needs to define its own grand strategy.
    12/05/18Publications
  • The Future of U.S. National Security, with Derek Reveron
    10/10/2018
    "Is it still fair to say there are continuities in foreign policy two years into the Trump administration? I'm going to say yes, and I'll offer some evidence," declares Derek S. Reveron of the U.S. Naval War College and Harvard Kennedy School. Don't miss this expert analysis of America's role in the world.
    10/10/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • All Options Are on the Table: Threats and Coercive Diplomacy in Foreign Affairs
    10/02/2018
    Are there ever justifiable reasons for issuing threats to achieve foreign policy objectives? In particular, are President Trump's threats against Iran justified? Don't miss this rare opportunity to get the Iranian perspective with this stimulating discussion between Drs. Reichberg and Syse of the Peace Research Insitute Oslo (PRIO) and H.E. Gholamali Khoshroo, permanent representative of Iran to the United Nations.
    10/02/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Rise and Fall (and Rise) of Chemical Weapons
    08/07/2018
    "Chemical weapons have been used in almost every decade since their advent just over a century ago. They are not a specter, like nuclear weapons. We know their effects, and how numerous states have employed them, and how they might do so in the future. In fact, after a few decades of relative non-use, chemical-weapons attacks have again exploded onto the scene--as a weapon of war, terror, and as a tool of state assassination."
    08/07/18Publications
  • YEMEN: An Economic Strategy to Ease the Humanitarian Crisis
    06/15/2018
    As the war in Yemen gets even worse, Dave Harden, former USAID minister counsellor to Yemen, offers a practical, multi-pronged economic strategy to improve household purchasing power and thus alleviate the suffering of the Yemeni people.
    06/15/18Publications
  • Restoring Trust: How Can the American Public Regain its Confidence in its National Security Apparatus?
    06/13/2018
    There is a huge divide in the way Americans assess U.S. foreign policy. Take for example, the June G7 meeting, which ended in a clash between Trump and some of America's closest allies: Some say it was a disaster; others say Trump did the right thing. Where do we go from here to restore trust in expertise and government? Don't miss this fascinating conversation with two leading commentators, Colin Dueck and Kori Schake.
    06/13/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts

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