• Illiberal Democracy on the Rise: Examining Brazil, Hungary, & India
    06/09/2021
    The post-World War II liberal order faces unprecedented upheaval as countries and their leaders retreat from globalism, embrace nationalism, and attack democratic norms. Whether it’s Bolsonaro in Brazil, Orbán in Hungary, or Modi in India--illiberalism is on the rise. Carnegie Council President Joel H. Rosenthal hosts a virtual panel to assess the current threats against democracy in Brazil, Hungary, and India; discuss steps to support a revival of democratic values globally; and finally, examine the question: Is democracy an ethical standard?
    06/09/21MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Narrowing Hearts and Minds: Diagnosing the Global Rise of Illiberal Democracy
    06/02/2021
    From Hungary to India to Brazil to the United States, there is no doubt that illiberalism is on the rise, writes Joel Rosenthal, president of Carnegie Council. Just as the world is becoming more connected, hearts and minds are constricting in ways that are sure to be self-defeating. But if we act quickly, we can use this moment as an opportunity to better understand this alarming trend and detect the problems within liberal democracy itself.  
    06/02/21Publications
  • Are Americans Facing an Undemocratic Future? with Jason Stanley
    04/16/2021
    U.S. democracy is at a dangerous inflection point. As America emerges from the January 6th assault on the Capitol, society faces a critical question: Can democracy bounce back or are Americans facing an undemocratic future? Carnegie Council President Joel Rosenthal and Yale's Jason Stanley discuss how to undo the damage done to U.S. institutions and the rise of nationalism around the world, from India to Brazil to Hungary.
    04/16/21MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Fractured Globalization & Dissolving Ethics, with Nikolas Gvosdev
    04/17/2020
    If global interconnections begin to fray in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, what happens to the ethical underpinnings of international relations? Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev and Carnegie Council President Joel Rosenthal discuss this important question and much more as solidarity begins to weaken among European Union and NATO states.
    04/17/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Hungary and the Values Test
    03/31/2020
    In the wake of the Hungarian parliament's vote to allow the executive to rule by decree, Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev reflects on the call by some to expel Hungary from the North Atlantic Treaty Organization--on the grounds that the country no longer upholds the liberal-democratic values that should form the basis of the security association.
    03/31/20Publications
  • Ill Winds: Saving Democracy from Russian Rage, Chinese Ambition, and American Complacency, with Larry Diamond
    06/20/2019
    Larry Diamond's core argument is stark: the defense and advancement of democratic ideals relies on U.S. global leadership. If the U.S. does not reclaim its traditional place as the keystone of democracy, today's authoritarian trend could become a tsunami that could provide an opening for Vladimir Putin, Xi Jinping, and their admirers to turn the 21st century into a dark time of surging authoritarianism.
    06/20/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • How to Lose a Country: The 7 Steps from Democracy to Dictatorship, with Ece Temelkuran
    06/03/2019
    In her new book, award-winning Turkish novelist and political commentator Ece Temelkuran lays out the seven steps from democracy to dictatorship. "Some of these steps might be invisible to people even when they are living in it," she says, "so I wanted to make sure that people of the world, especially Western societies, can see what is happening to them so they won't lose time like we did in Turkey. I hope they won't end up losing their country as we did."
    06/03/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Human Rights, Liberalism, & Ordinary Virtues, with Michael Ignatieff
    04/22/2019
    Central European University's President Michael Ignatieff is a human rights scholar, an educator, a former politician, and, as he tells us, the son of a refugee. He discusses what he calls "the ordinary virtues," such as patience and tolerance; the status of human rights today and the dilemmas of migration; the essential critera for true democracy; and the ideal curriculum. His advice to students: Learn to think for yourself.
    04/22/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Winners of Carnegie Council's International Student Essay Contest 2018 - Is it Important to Live in a Democracy?
    03/12/2019
    The topic: Is it important to live in a democracy? Winners come from Argentina, China, Colombia, Ghana, Hungary, South Korea, Tunisia, and the USA. Read their different perspectives here.
    03/12/19NewsPress Releases
  • Living in an "Illiberal Democracy"
    03/12/2019
    "Today, virtually all countries make claim to democracy, even conspicuous dictatorships such as the Democratic People's Republic of Korea," writes Gergely Bérces from Hungary. "Reality, however, increasingly consists of citizens of ostensibly democratic countries sacrificing their freedoms, violating human rights, and, paradoxically, extinguishing democracy-—their own and those of others—-in the name of democracy."
    03/12/19Publications
  • Top Risks and Ethical Decisions 2019, with Ian Bremmer
    01/16/2019
    The wide array of global issues--more than 90 percent of them--that Eurasia Group follows are now headed in the wrong direction in 2019. Eurasia Group president Ian Bremmer breaks down those risks--from U.S.-China relations and cyberwar to European populism and American institutions--and their ethical implications with Carnegie Council's Devin Stewart for their 11th annual discussion of the year's coming top risks.
    01/16/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Jailing of Journalists Worldwide, with CPJ's Elana Beiser
    12/19/2018
    Elana Beiser of the Committee to Protect Journalists discusses the latest CPJ report, which finds that for the third year in a row, 251 or more journalists are jailed around the world, suggesting the authoritarian approach to critical news coverage is more than a temporary spike. Also for the third year running, Turkey, China, and Egypt were responsible for about half of those imprisoned, with Turkey remaining the world's worst jailer.
    12/19/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Refining Strategic Autonomy: A Call for European Grand Strategy
    12/05/2018
    Europe has come to realize that the United States is no longer the stalwart ally of the Cold War era. With the resurgence of China, the return of Russia, the retreat of the United States, and the rise of the rest, Europe needs to define its own grand strategy.
    12/05/18Publications
  • Democracy Promotion in the Age of Trump
    05/22/2018
    In this panel Adrian Basora makes a strong case for democracy as not only promoting American values but also serving U.S. interests, while Maia Otarashvili gives a frightening overview of the rise of "illiberal values" (Viktor Orbán's phrase) in the Eurasia region. Basora and Otarashvili are co-editors of "Does Democracy Matter? The United States and Global Democracy Support" and Nikolas Gvosdev is one of the contributors.
    05/22/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The People vs. Democracy: Why Our Freedom Is in Danger and How to Save It, with Yascha Mounk
    04/23/2018
    Harvard's Yascha Mounk argues that liberalism and democracy are coming apart, creating new forms of illiberal democracy (democracy without rights) and undemocratic liberalism (rights without democracy). Populist leaders are flourishing; indeed, Hungary is on the verge of descending into dictatorship, with shamefully little criticism from the Europe or the U.S. What are the causes of this phenomenon? What can we do about it?
    04/23/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Anti-Pluralism: The Populist Threat to Liberal Democracy, with William A. Galston
    03/29/2018
    Some unpleasant truths for liberals, from William Galston: The rise of anti-pluralist populist movements is caused by a combination of economic factors and migration; we need to take these concerns seriously, instead of feeling morally superior. In the U.S., this will require reintegrating our economy so that small towns and rural areas thrive again; breaking through government gridlock; and purging the "poison" of our immigration policies.
    03/29/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • To Fight Against This Age: On Fascism and Humanism, with Rob Riemen
    02/05/2018
    No more euphemisms and denials, says Rob Riemen in this frightening and inspiring talk. Call it by its name: fascism. Neither technology, nor economic growth, nor political activism can fix this, he continues. We must create a new counterculture that replaces kitsch and conformism with truth, empathy, beauty, and justice.
    02/05/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Fractured Continent: Europe's Crises and the Fate of the West, with William Drozdiak
    12/07/2017
    In some ways Europe is more fragmented than at any time in the last three decades, says Drozdiak. There's a north/south split between wealthy creditor nations and deeply indebted ones; an east/west divide, as Poland and Hungary revert to nationalism; pressures of regional separatism; Brexit; and the migrant crisis. Then there's Trump, who sees Europe as a burden and economic rival. 2018 could be a pivotal year. What will happen?
    12/07/17MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Marlene Laruelle on Europe's Far-Right Political Movements
    11/17/2017
    What has led to the rise of far-right parties across Europe and how have they evolved over time? Is immigration really the main issue, or is there a more complex set of problems that vary from nation to nation? What are the ideological and practical connections between the far right and Russia? Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Marlene Laruelle is an expert on Europe, Russia, Eurasia, and Europe's far right. Don't miss her analysis.
    11/17/17MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Ordinary Virtues: Moral Order in a Divided World
    09/29/2017
    To mark Carnegie Council's Centennial, Michael Ignatieff and team set out to discover what moral values people hold in common across nations. What he found was that while universal human rights may be the language of states and liberal elites, what resonate with most people are "ordinary virtues" practiced on a person-to-person basis, such as tolerance and forgiveness. He concludes that liberals most focus on strengthening these ordinary virtues.
    09/29/17MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts

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