• Searching for a Post-Pandemic Order
    09/25/2020
    In this blog post, Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev reflects on his recent webinar with Ali Wyne of the Atlantic Council. What will the role of the United States be in the "post-pandemic order"? Will the international response to COVID-19, as well as other environmental considerations, lead to a new "affirmative agenda" for U.S. foreign policy?
    09/25/20Publications
  • The Last Million: Europe's Displaced Persons from World War to Cold War, with David Nasaw
    09/23/2020
    The aftershocks of World War II did not end with German capitulation in May 1945. Millions were displaced, including concentration camp survivors, POWs, slave laborers, political prisoners, and Nazi collaborators. Many eventually returned home, but "the lost million" did not. Author David Nasaw and Carnegie Council President Joel Rosenthal discuss this forgotten chapter in history and its relevance to today.
    09/23/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Great Power Populism, COVID-19, & Missing Leadership, with Damjan Krnjević Mišković & Nikolas Gvosdev
    05/12/2020
    What is "great power populism" and what does it mean during the pandemic? Are we heading towards another global conflict? And are there any leaders who can inspire the "international community" during a crisis? ADA University's Damjan Krnjević Mišković and Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev share their thoughts on the causes and characteristics of the ongoing "nervous breakdown" in the international system.
    05/12/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Health Data, Privacy, & Surveillance: How Will the Lockdowns End? with Effy Vayena & Jeffrey Kahn
    04/24/2020
    How should we think about privacy and government surveillance during the COVID-19 pandemic? Johns Hopkins' Jeffrey Kahn and ETH Zurich's Effy Vayena discuss health data and government surveillance, focusing on contract tracing apps in Europe and immunity certificates in the United States, with Carnegie Council President Joel Rosenthal in this virtual webinar.
    04/24/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • COVID-19: Eroding the Ethics of Solidarity?
    04/08/2020
    "Solidarity is easy when there is no perceived cost or major sacrifice entailed," writes Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev. How has the COVID-19 pandemic stress-tested the depths and resilience of solidarity between states?
    04/08/20Publications
  • The Crack-Up: The Birth of the Modern Middle East, with Ted Widmer
    01/31/2020
    At the end of World War I, colonial powers carved up the Ottoman Empire and the reverberations are still being felt today. Historian Ted Widmer discusses the circumstances that led to this fateful episode and why Woodrow Wilson wasn't able to extend his principle of "self-determination" to the Middle East. How should we think about the Trump-Netanyahu peace plan in the context of what happened in Palestine in 1919?
    01/31/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Loisach Group and the Democratic Community Narrative
    12/11/2019
    Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev reports from the Berlin meetings of the Losiach Group, a U.S.-German strategic dialogue, where the trans-Atlantic relationship and the rise of China are important points of discussion. Could countering China be the basis of a new Euro-American conneciton?
    12/11/19Publications
  • Gene Editing: Overview, Ethics, & the Near Future, with Robert Klitzman
    11/20/2019
    In the first in a series of podcasts on gene editing, Columbia's Dr. Robert Klitzman provides an overview of the technology, ethical and governance issues, and where it could all go in the near future. Plus he explains why the birth of genetically engineered twins in China last year was a "seismic" event. How could gene editing lead to more inequality? What could be some of unintended consequences?
    11/20/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Struggle for Recognition in International Relations, with Michelle Murray
    10/17/2019
    How can established powers manage the peaceful rise of new great powers? Bard's Michelle Murray offers a new answer to this perennial question, arguing that power transitions are principally social phenomena whereby rising powers struggle to obtain recognition as world powers. How can this framework help us to understand the economic and military rivalry between United States and China?
    10/17/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Model International Mobility Convention, with Michael Doyle
    09/04/2019
    In this timely talk, SIPA's Professor Michael Doyle details the Model International Mobility Convention, a "hypothetical ideal convention" developed to define a "comprehensive and coherent" set of regulations for the movement of people across borders. Why was it so important to account for tourists alongside refugees and migrant workers? How does this document represent a "realistic utopia"?
    09/04/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Crack-Up: A Hundred Years of Student Protests in China, with Jeffrey Wasserstrom
    06/17/2019
    In the latest "Crack-Up" podcast, China expert Jeffrey Wasserstrom discusses the rich history of Chinese student protests. From the May Fourth movement in 1919 to Tiananmen Square in 1989 to today's mass demonstrations in Hong Kong, what are the threads that tie these moments together? Don't miss this fascinating talk, which also touches on Woodrow Wilson, the Russian Revolution, and a young Mao Zedong.
    06/17/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Speech Police: The Global Struggle to Govern the Internet, with David Kaye
    06/13/2019
    The original idea of the Internet was for it to be a "free speech nirvana," but in 2019, the reality is quite different. Authoritarians spread disinformation and extremists incite hatred, often on the huge, U.S.-based platforms, YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter. David Kaye, UN special rapporteur on freedom of opinion & expression, details the different approaches to these issues in Europe and the United States and looks for solutions in this informed and important talk.
    06/13/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Carnegie Council Announces Robert J. Myers Fellows for 2019
    05/23/2019
    The Robert J. Myers Fellows Fund supports and promotes activities of the Carnegie Council network that embody Mr. Myers' vision of effective ethical inquiry rooted in local experiences and communities. This year 13 projects were chosen, with a diverse range of issues concerning China, the Czech Republic, Africa, Germany, Indonesia, Japan, Montenegro, Poland, and Venezuela. Topics also include climate justice, human rights, women, and more.
    05/23/19NewsPress Releases
  • 100 Years After Versailles
    05/14/2019
    Just weeks after an armistice halted the most devastating conflict in generations, the victors of the Great War set out to negotiate the terms of the peace--and to rewrite the rules of international relations. A century later, we live in a world shaped by the Treaty of Versailles. In this fascinating discussion, a panel of distinguished historians delve into the complex situation on the ground at the time and the Treaty's legacy today, from Europe and the U.S. to Asia and the Middle East.
    05/14/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • How Change Happens, with Cass Sunstein
    04/23/2019
    From the French Revolution to the Arab Spring to #MeToo, how does social change happen? In a book that was 25 years in the making, Cass Sunstein unpacks this puzzle by exploring the interplay of three decisive factors. Don't miss this insightful talk. It may change how you view the world.
    04/23/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Crack-Up: Winston Churchill & the Geopolitics of 1919, with Andrew Roberts
    04/08/2019
    In this episode of the Crack-Up series on 1919, Andrew Roberts, author of "Churchill: Walking with Destiny," examines how Churchill dealt with the complicated problems facing Great Britain at the end of World War I, including how to treat the Germans in defeat, his changing views on Russia--but always in pursuit of British national interests--his stance on a homeland for the Jews, and his determination to hold on to British India.
    04/08/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • From Gutenberg to Google: The History of Our Future, with Tom Wheeler
    04/05/2019
    We've been through information and technology revolutions before, going back to Gutenberg, says former FCC chairman Tom Wheeler. Now it's our turn to be at a terminus of history and the rules that worked for industrial capitalism are probably no longer adequate for Internet capitalism. So our task is not to flee but to stand up, recognize the challenge, and deal with it.
    04/05/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Romania: NATO's Frail Anchor in a Turbulent Black Sea
    04/05/2019
    "This week, together with six other former communist bloc countries, Romania marks the 15th anniversary of its NATO accession," writes Theo Stan. "If it succeeds to get its act together the country's pro-U.S. posture and diplomacy may never have weighed more in anchoring Euro-Atlantic stability."
    04/05/19Publications
  • Global Ethics Weekly: Liberal Democracy, Empathy, & AI, with Alexander Görlach
    03/28/2019
    In this wide-ranging talk, Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Alexander Görlach discusses the importance of empathy in liberal democracies, the shocking Uyghur detention in China, and how AI is affecting all facets of society. What does liberalism look like in 2019? How will technology change democracy and religion?
    03/28/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Enduring False Promise of Preventive War, with Scott A. Silverstone
    02/26/2019
    Does preventive war really work? "In the vast majority of cases historically, what we see is the country that thought it was saving itself from a greater danger in the future actually creates this greater danger because you generate a level of hostility, a deepening rivalry, and a desire for revenge that comes back to haunt them," says Scott Silverstone. His advice: Hesitate. Before taking action, think through this "preventive war paradox."
    02/26/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts

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