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  • A Thousand Small Sanities: The Moral Adventure of Liberalism, with Adam Gopnik
    05/22/2019
    In his eloquent defense of liberalism, Adam Gopnik goes back to its origins and argues that rather than being emphasizing the role of the individual, "two principles, the principle of community and the principle of compromise," are at the core of the liberal project. Indeed, these are the essential elements of humane, pluralist societies; and in an age of autocracy, our very lives may depend on their continued existence.
    05/22/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • 100 Years After Versailles
    05/14/2019
    Just weeks after an armistice halted the most devastating conflict in generations, the victors of the Great War set out to negotiate the terms of the peace--and to rewrite the rules of international relations. A century later, we live in a world shaped by the Treaty of Versailles. In this fascinating discussion, a panel of distinguished historians delve into the complex situation on the ground at the time and the Treaty's legacy today, from Europe and the U.S. to Asia and the Middle East.
    05/14/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Enduring False Promise of Preventive War, with Scott A. Silverstone
    02/26/2019
    Does preventive war really work? "In the vast majority of cases historically, what we see is the country that thought it was saving itself from a greater danger in the future actually creates this greater danger because you generate a level of hostility, a deepening rivalry, and a desire for revenge that comes back to haunt them," says Scott Silverstone. His advice: Hesitate. Before taking action, think through this "preventive war paradox."
    02/26/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Crack-Up: Jazz Arrives, Loudly, in 1919, with David Sager
    02/22/2019
    In this fascinating podcast, Ted Widmer talks to jazz historian David Sager about his "New York Times" essay on the genre's breakthrough in 1919, its popularity in France during World War I, and the tragic story of legendary African American bandleader James Reese Europe.
    02/22/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: The Situation in Western Sahara, with Ambassador Sidi Omar
    02/07/2019
    Ambassador Sidi Omar, UN representative for Frente POLISARIO, a liberation movement aiming to secure the independence of Western Sahara, discusses the decades-long dispute in Northwest Africa. With negotiations ongoing between Frente POLISARIO and Morocco at the UN, could there be a resolution? How do Europe and the Trump administration fit in?
    02/07/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • A Chance for Peace in Western Sahara
    02/05/2019
    "For over a century, the people of Western Sahara have been denied our fundamental right to decide our future," writes Sidi Omar, UN representative for Frente POLISARIO, a liberation movement aiming to secure the independence of Western Sahara. Recent months have seen a flurry of diplomatic activity, prompted by the Trump administration and the appointment of a new personal envoy for the UN secretary-general. Will there be peace at last?
    02/05/19Publications
  • After Katowice: Three Civil Society Strategies for Ratcheting Up Climate Ambition
    01/18/2019
    The recent climate conference in Katowice, Poland was a milestone for the Paris Agreement, and it points to the role NGOs can play in encouraging states to ratchet up climate ambition.
    01/18/19Publications
  • 1919 & the Crack Up, with Ted Widmer
    01/17/2019
    Created and hosted by Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Ted Widmer, "The Crack-Up" is a special podcast series about the events of 1919, a year that in many ways shaped the 20th century and the modern world. And throughout 2019, "The New York Times" will be running long features on the legacy of 1919. These videos explain why 1919 was such an important year, what "the crack-up" means, and previews upcoming essays and podcasts.
    01/17/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: 1919 & the Modern World, with Ted Widmer
    01/17/2019
    Historian Ted Widmer discusses his new Carnegie Council podcast series "The Crack-Up" and how 1919 has shaped the modern world. He and host Alex Woodson speak about parallels to 2019, Woodrow Wilson and the League of Nations, Babe Ruth, the early days of Hollywood, and populism in Europe in the aftermath of World War I. Don't miss a new "Crack-Up" tomorrow with Harvard historian Lisa McGirr on prohibition and the American state.
    01/17/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Top Risks and Ethical Decisions 2019, with Ian Bremmer
    01/16/2019
    The wide array of global issues--more than 90 percent of them--that Eurasia Group follows are now headed in the wrong direction in 2019. Eurasia Group president Ian Bremmer breaks down those risks--from U.S.-China relations and cyberwar to European populism and American institutions--and their ethical implications with Carnegie Council's Devin Stewart for their 11th annual discussion of the year's coming top risks.
    01/16/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Most Popular Carnegie Council Resources, 2018
    12/18/2018
    Carnegie Council presents its most popular resources created in 2018. Topics include solutions to inequality, Russian influence in France, democracy in danger, the situation in Burma/Myanmar, artificial intelligence, and much more.
    12/18/18NewsPress Releases
  • Global Ethics Weekly: The End of World War I & the Future of American Democracy, with Ted Widmer
    12/06/2018
    Historian and Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Ted Widmer looks back to the end of the First World War, and the upheaval that followed it in Europe and the U.S., and forward to a new stage in the Trump presidency. Plus, he and host Alex Woodson discuss ways to improve American democracy and what can be learned from the legacy of President George H. W. Bush.
    12/06/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Refining Strategic Autonomy: A Call for European Grand Strategy
    12/05/2018
    Europe has come to realize that the United States is no longer the stalwart ally of the Cold War era. With the resurgence of China, the return of Russia, the retreat of the United States, and the rise of the rest, Europe needs to define its own grand strategy.
    12/05/18Publications
  • Education for Peace: The Living Legacy of the First World War
    11/07/2018
    Four Fellows from Carnegie Council's "The Living Legacy of WWI" project present their research on different aspects of the war--counterterrorism, airpower, chemical warfare, and Latin America--and its long-term impacts. The panel was part of the Carnegie Peacebuilding Conversations, a three-day program at the Peace Palace in The Hague, Netherlands, presented in cooperation with Carnegie institutions worldwide and other partners.
    11/07/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Fight for Liberty, with Max Boot, Philip Bobbitt, Garry Kasparov, & Bret Stephens
    10/19/2018
    We live in a time when liberal democracy is on the defensive, not only in the U.S. but around the world. Yet these speakers, whose roots reflect the political spectrum, are optimistic that having a fresh discussion on moral values and basic principles such as freedom of speech, a free press, and the rule of law can help bring democracy back to health. Don't miss this valuable discussion.
    10/19/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Rise and Fall (and Rise) of Chemical Weapons
    08/07/2018
    "Chemical weapons have been used in almost every decade since their advent just over a century ago. They are not a specter, like nuclear weapons. We know their effects, and how numerous states have employed them, and how they might do so in the future. In fact, after a few decades of relative non-use, chemical-weapons attacks have again exploded onto the scene--as a weapon of war, terror, and as a tool of state assassination."
    08/07/18Publications
  • Carnegie Council Presents Materials in French and English from Year-Long Research Project, "Russian Soft Power in France"
    07/24/2018
    This year-long project explored Russian influence in French political parties and civil society institutions today. The research includes historical background on relations between France and Russia, which is essential to an understanding of the current situation. This valuable case study on France sheds light on Russia's soft power strategies to bolster allied political parties in established European democracies.
    07/24/18NewsPress Releases
  • Top 10 Podcasts for the 2017-2018 Program Year
    07/10/2018
    The number one most accessed Carnegie Council podcast in 2017-2018 was Scott Sagan on nuclear weapons (video), followed by Qin Gao on poverty in China (video), Ambassador Derek Mitchell on Burma (audio), Amy Chua on political tribes (video), and Andreas Harsono on Indonesia (audio).
    07/10/18PublicationsResource Picks
  • Russian Soft Power in France, with Marlene Laruelle & Jean-Yves Camus
    06/20/2018
    It's important to understand that Russia and France have had a centuries-long relationship which is mostly positive, say French scholars Marlene Laruelle and Jean-Yves Camus. Today there are layers of close economic and cultural ties, as well as common geopolitical interests, and the French extreme right and Russia share many of the same conservative values. Thus the remarkable strength of Russian influence in France is not surprising.
    06/20/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • French Political Parties and Russia: The Politics of Power and Influence
    06/13/2018
    "In 2018, what relationship do French political parties have with the Russian Federation, its government, and its political parties, including but not limited to its most prominent party, United Russia?"
    06/13/18Publications

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