• Protests in Perspective: Lessons from the Past, with Michael Canham & Adom Getachew
    10/05/2020
    In this "Protests in Perspective" webinar, moderated by Williams University's Professor Neil Roberts, South African government official Michael Canham and University of Chicago's Professor Adom Getachew discuss the 2020 protests in an international and historical context. What can the Movement for Black Lives learn from the anti-apartheid movement? What makes the African American struggle so resonant with minorities and oppressed people around the world?
    10/05/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Ethics & International Affairs Volume 34.2 (Summer 2020)
    07/09/2020
    The highlight of the Summer 2020 issue of "Ethics & International Affairs" is a roundtable organized by Daniel R. Brunstetter on limited strikes and the associated ethical, legal, and strategic concerns. The collection contains contributions from Daniel R. Brunstetter, Wendy Pearlman, Jean-Baptiste Jeangène Vilmer, Danielle L. Lupton, and Eric A. Heinze and Rhiannon Neilsen.
    07/09/20Publications
  • Just Out: "Ethics & International Affairs" Summer 2020 Issue
    07/09/2020
    The highlight of the Summer 2020 issue of "Ethics & International Affairs" is a roundtable organized by Daniel R. Brunstetter on limited strikes and the associated ethical, legal, and strategic concerns. The collection contains contributions from Daniel R. Brunstetter, Wendy Pearlman, Jean-Baptiste Jeangène Vilmer, Danielle L. Lupton, and Eric A. Heinze and Rhiannon Neilsen.
    07/09/20NewsPress Releases
  • Great Power Populism, COVID-19, & Missing Leadership, with Damjan Krnjević Mišković & Nikolas Gvosdev
    05/12/2020
    What is "great power populism" and what does it mean during the pandemic? Are we heading towards another global conflict? And are there any leaders who can inspire the "international community" during a crisis? ADA University's Damjan Krnjević Mišković and Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev share their thoughts on the causes and characteristics of the ongoing "nervous breakdown" in the international system.
    05/12/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Winners of Carnegie Council's International Student Essay Contest 2019 - Internet Responsibility
    01/31/2020
    Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs is pleased to announce the winners of its 2019 International Student Essay Contest. Winners come from France/Italy, Pakistan, Russia, South Korea, and the United States.
    01/31/20NewsPress Releases
  • The Crack-Up: The Birth of the Modern Middle East, with Ted Widmer
    01/31/2020
    At the end of World War I, colonial powers carved up the Ottoman Empire and the reverberations are still being felt today. Historian Ted Widmer discusses the circumstances that led to this fateful episode and why Woodrow Wilson wasn't able to extend his principle of "self-determination" to the Middle East. How should we think about the Trump-Netanyahu peace plan in the context of what happened in Palestine in 1919?
    01/31/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • IF Internet — THEN Free
    01/31/2020
    This essay written by Evgeny Nedoborskiy is the first prize winner of the undergraduate category in the 2019 student essay contest. If we want to preserve the benefits of an open internet, he writes, "then it is our ethical responsibility to oppose any extensive regulation of it."
    01/31/20Publications
  • The Individual & the Collective, Politics, & the UN, with Jean-Marie Guéhenno
    10/21/2019
    Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Jean-Marie Guéhenno, former head of United Nations peacekeeping operations, discusses the tensions between the individual and the collective in a world filled with political tension, pervasive surveillance, and fear of risk. What is the role of the UN in this environment? How can we avoid the violent upheavals that marked other transitional phases in humanity?
    10/21/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • A Thousand Small Sanities: The Moral Adventure of Liberalism, with Adam Gopnik
    05/22/2019
    In his eloquent defense of liberalism, Adam Gopnik goes back to its origins and argues that rather than emphasizing the role of the individual, the principles of community and compromise are at the core of the liberal project. Indeed, these are the essential elements of humane, pluralist societies; and in an age of autocracy, our very lives may depend on their continued existence.
    05/22/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • 100 Years After Versailles
    05/14/2019
    Just weeks after an armistice halted the most devastating conflict in generations, the victors of the Great War set out to negotiate the terms of the peace--and to rewrite the rules of international relations. A century later, we live in a world shaped by the Treaty of Versailles. In this fascinating discussion, a panel of distinguished historians delve into the complex situation on the ground at the time and the Treaty's legacy today, from Europe and the U.S. to Asia and the Middle East.
    05/14/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Enduring False Promise of Preventive War, with Scott A. Silverstone
    02/26/2019
    Does preventive war really work? "In the vast majority of cases historically, what we see is the country that thought it was saving itself from a greater danger in the future actually creates this greater danger because you generate a level of hostility, a deepening rivalry, and a desire for revenge that comes back to haunt them," says Scott Silverstone. His advice: Hesitate. Before taking action, think through this "preventive war paradox."
    02/26/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Crack-Up: Jazz Arrives, Loudly, in 1919, with David Sager
    02/22/2019
    In this fascinating podcast, Ted Widmer talks to jazz historian David Sager about his "New York Times" essay on the genre's breakthrough in 1919, its popularity in France during World War I, and the tragic story of legendary African American bandleader James Reese Europe.
    02/22/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: The Situation in Western Sahara, with Ambassador Sidi Omar
    02/07/2019
    Ambassador Sidi Omar, UN representative for Frente POLISARIO, a liberation movement aiming to secure the independence of Western Sahara, discusses the decades-long dispute in Northwest Africa. With negotiations ongoing between Frente POLISARIO and Morocco at the UN, could there be a resolution? How do Europe and the Trump administration fit in?
    02/07/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • A Chance for Peace in Western Sahara
    02/05/2019
    "For over a century, the people of Western Sahara have been denied our fundamental right to decide our future," writes Sidi Omar, UN representative for Frente POLISARIO, a liberation movement aiming to secure the independence of Western Sahara. Recent months have seen a flurry of diplomatic activity, prompted by the Trump administration and the appointment of a new personal envoy for the UN secretary-general. Will there be peace at last?
    02/05/19Publications
  • After Katowice: Three Civil Society Strategies for Ratcheting Up Climate Ambition
    01/18/2019
    The recent climate conference in Katowice, Poland was a milestone for the Paris Agreement, and it points to the role NGOs can play in encouraging states to ratchet up climate ambition.
    01/18/19Publications
  • 1919 & the Crack Up, with Ted Widmer
    01/17/2019
    Created and hosted by Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Ted Widmer, "The Crack-Up" is a special podcast series about the events of 1919, a year that in many ways shaped the 20th century and the modern world. And throughout 2019, "The New York Times" will be running long features on the legacy of 1919. These videos explain why 1919 was such an important year, what "the crack-up" means, and previews upcoming essays and podcasts.
    01/17/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: 1919 & the Modern World, with Ted Widmer
    01/17/2019
    Historian Ted Widmer discusses his new Carnegie Council podcast series "The Crack-Up" and how 1919 has shaped the modern world. He and host Alex Woodson speak about parallels to 2019, Woodrow Wilson and the League of Nations, Babe Ruth, the early days of Hollywood, and populism in Europe in the aftermath of World War I. Don't miss a new "Crack-Up" tomorrow with Harvard historian Lisa McGirr on prohibition and the American state.
    01/17/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Top Risks and Ethical Decisions 2019, with Ian Bremmer
    01/16/2019
    The wide array of global issues--more than 90 percent of them--that Eurasia Group follows are now headed in the wrong direction in 2019. Eurasia Group president Ian Bremmer breaks down those risks--from U.S.-China relations and cyberwar to European populism and American institutions--and their ethical implications with Carnegie Council's Devin Stewart for their 11th annual discussion of the year's coming top risks.
    01/16/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Most Popular Carnegie Council Resources, 2018
    12/18/2018
    Carnegie Council presents its most popular resources created in 2018. Topics include solutions to inequality, Russian influence in France, democracy in danger, the situation in Burma/Myanmar, artificial intelligence, and much more.
    12/18/18NewsPress Releases
  • Global Ethics Weekly: The End of World War I & the Future of American Democracy, with Ted Widmer
    12/06/2018
    Historian and Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Ted Widmer looks back to the end of the First World War, and the upheaval that followed it in Europe and the U.S., and forward to a new stage in the Trump presidency. Plus, he and host Alex Woodson discuss ways to improve American democracy and what can be learned from the legacy of President George H. W. Bush.
    12/06/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts

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