• The End of the U.S.-Taliban Talks? with Jonathan Cristol
    09/18/2019
    Despite progress over the last year, Donald Trump effectively ended the latest round of U.S.-Taliban negotiations with a tweet earlier this month. Will talks continue in a more understated way? Does this change anything on the ground in Afghanistan? And what is the Taliban doing in Moscow? Jonathan Cristol, author of "The United States and the Taliban before and after 9/11," discusses all this and more.
    09/18/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Ethics & International Affairs Volume 33.3 (Fall 2019)
    09/10/2019
    The highlight of the Fall 2019 issue of "Ethics & International Affairs" is a roundtable on "Economic Sanctions and Their Consequences." Other topics include human rights and conflict resolution, Afghan attitudes toward civilian wartime harm, the role of supererogation on the battlefield, and the ethics of not-so-civil resistance.
    09/10/19Publications
  • Just Out: "Ethics & International Affairs" Fall 2019 Issue
    09/10/2019
    The highlight of the Fall 2019 issue of "Ethics & International Affairs" is a roundtable on "Economic Sanctions and Their Consequences." Other topics include human rights and conflict resolution, Afghan attitudes toward civilian wartime harm, the role of supererogation on the battlefield, and the ethics of not-so-civil resistance.
    09/10/19NewsPress Releases
  • Prioritizing the Linkages Between Sustainable Development Goals to Eradicate Child Marriage
    08/08/2019
    "Child marriage is both a cause and consequence of the other societal ills outlined in the UN's Sustainable Development Goals," writes human rights attorney Megan E. Corrado. This connection is especially stark in states like Afghanistan, which face instability due to conflict. What can governments and civil society do to help children in need? What are some grassroots approaches?
    08/08/19Publications
  • Immigration: A National Security Imperative
    05/13/2019
    "The U.S. intelligence community is dependent on immigration to maintain language and cultural skills that protect American lives every day," writes military veteran Philip Caruso. "Although the immigration policy debate is often portrayed as a clash of American values, human rights, and pragmatic challenges, any solution must also recognize rational and pragmatic immigration as a national security imperative."
    05/13/19Publications
  • Global Ethics Weekly: The U.S.-Taliban Negotiations, with Jonathan Cristol
    02/21/2019
    Jonathan Cristol, author of "The United States and Taliban before and after 9/11," discusses the status of the latest talks between the U.S. government and the Taliban, in an effort to end the decades-long war in Afghanistan. Are women's rights being addressed? Are neighboring countries' interests being taken into account? And can we trust the Trump administration in this tense geopolitical environment?
    02/21/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: U.S. Defense Policy After Mattis, with Asha Castleberry
    01/09/2019
    National security expert and U.S. Army veteran Asha Castleberry makes sense of a busy and seemingly chaotic time for the Department of Defense in the wake of Secretary Mattis' departure. What should think about Trump's plans in Syria and Afghanistan? How is the U.S. planning to counter China in Africa? And has John Bolton actually been a moderating influence?
    01/09/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: The U.S. & the Taliban Before & After 9/11, with Jonathan Cristol
    11/08/2018
    When most Americans think about the Taliban, their minds go to Osama bin Laden, terrorism, and the endless war in Afghanistan. But as Jonathan Cristol writes in his book, "The United States and Taliban before and after 9/11," there is much more to the story as both sides met countless times in the 1990s, with the Taliban eager to have good relations with America. What was the bigger stumbling block for the U.S.: women's rights or al-Qaeda? What are the lessons for today?
    11/08/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Future of U.S. National Security, with Derek Reveron
    10/10/2018
    "Is it still fair to say there are continuities in foreign policy two years into the Trump administration? I'm going to say yes, and I'll offer some evidence," declares Derek S. Reveron of the U.S. Naval War College and Harvard Kennedy School. Don't miss this expert analysis of America's role in the world.
    10/10/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • An Update on Pakistan, with Ahmed Rashid
    10/05/2018
    Acclaimed journalist Ahmed Rashid discusses Pakistan's new populist prime minister, Imran Khan, whom he considers woefully unprepared. He also examines Pakistan's debt-ridden economy and Pakistan's complex relationships with China, India, the U.S., Afghanistan, and the Taliban. "I think the key thing to understand is the need to follow Afghanistan," he says. "Whatever happens in Pakistan will depend on what happens in Afghanistan."
    10/05/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Making Foreign Policy Relevant Again, with Asha Castleberry & Ali Wyne
    09/25/2018
    Has a gap opened up between the U.S. national security community and the general public over foreign policy? If so, why? How can we close it? Moderated by Nikolas Gvosdev, this panel with foreign policy experts Asha Castleberry and Ali Wyne is part of a larger effort by Carnegie Council's U.S. Global Engagement Program to examine drivers in U.S. politics pushing the United States to disengage from international affairs.
    09/25/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • From Cold War to Hot Peace: An American Ambassador in Putin's Russia, with Michael McFaul
    05/14/2018
    As Obama's adviser on Russian affairs, Michael McFaul helped craft the United States' policy known as "reset" that fostered new and unprecedented collaboration between the two countries. Then, as U.S. ambassador to Russia from 2012-2014, he had a front-row seat when this fleeting moment crumbled with Vladimir Putin's return to the presidency. "It's tragic," he says. "How is it that we have come back to something close to the Cold War?"
    05/14/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Army of None: Autonomous Weapons and the Future of War, with Paul Scharre
    05/08/2018
    "What happens when a predator drone has as much as autonomy as a self-driving car, moving to something that is able to do all of the combat functions all by itself, that it can go out, find the enemy, and attack the enemy without asking for permission?" asks military and technology expert Paul Scharre. The technology's not there yet, but it will be very soon, raising a host of ethical, legal, military, and security challenges.
    05/08/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Return of Marco Polo's World, with Robert D. Kaplan
    03/16/2018
    If you wish to understand the depth and breadth of the geographical, historical, technological, and political forces that are shaping our world, there is no better guide than Robert Kaplan. Using Marco Polo's journey as "a geographical framing device for Eurasia today," he examines China's ambitious One Belt One Road project, dissecting China's imperial dream and its multiple, under-reported objectives.
    03/16/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Political Tribes: Group Instinct and the Fate of Nations, with Amy Chua
    03/07/2018
    "The United States today is starting to display destructive political dynamics much more typically associated with developing countries: ethno-nationalist movements, the erosion of trust in our institutions and electoral outcomes, and above all, the transformation of democracy into an engine of zero-sum political tribalism."
    03/07/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Dangerous Delegation: Military Intervention & the U.S. Public, with Kori Schake
    02/21/2018
    Are Americans too deferential to the armed forces, becoming increasingly willing to "outsource" judgement to the military? Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev talks with Dr. Kori Schake of the International Institute for Strategic Studies, co-author with James Mattis of "Warriors and Citizens: American Views of Our Military."
    02/21/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • General Donald Bolduc on the U.S. War in Afghanistan
    07/25/2017
    In this inspiring interview, Brig. Gen. Bolduc discusses his time in Afghanistan and his assessment of the situation there as well as in Africa, where he was in charge of countering violent extremism. He also reveals his experiences with PTSD, traumatic brain injury (TBI), and multiple other physical injuries, explaining how he finally got help and how he is working hard to help others with the same issues.
    07/25/17MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Asha Castleberry on Trump's Generals and the Fight Against ISIS
    05/24/2017
    Asha Castleberry, Fordham professor and U.S. Army veteran, gives detailed updates of the campaigns against ISIS in Mosul and Raqqa and the endlessly complicated Syrian Civil War. She also discusses the ups and downs of Trump's strategy in the Middle East and the influence of Secretary Mattis and National Security Advisor McMaster.
    05/24/17MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Terror in France: The Rise of Jihad in the West
    05/12/2017
    From January 2015 to July 2016, 239 people in France died in terrorist attacks. In this gripping talk, leading French scholar Gilles Kepel explains the causes behind this new wave of violent jihad and discusses why Europe is the main target.
    05/12/17MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Limiting Civilian Casualties as Part of a Winning Strategy
    05/03/2017
    "Limiting civilian casualties is always morally and ethically the right thing to do," declares Joseph Felter, speaking from both his research and personal military experience. "But in some situations, it is also part of winning."
    05/03/17MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts

Load More