• After 20 Years of Grey Wars, a Moment to Consider a Different Course
    09/10/2021
    "As we approach the 20-year commemoration of 9/11, a chapter in the history of U.S. foreign policy is closing," writes Carnegie Council President Joel H. Rosenthal. How have the "grey" wars that followed changed the rules of engagement and influenced the United States domestically?
    09/10/21Publications
  • Twenty Years Since 9/11: Grey Wars, American Values, & the Future of National Security
    09/09/2021
    In the 20 years since the 9/11 attacks, national security decisions have tested the values of American democracy. This panel, hosted by Carnegie Council President Joel Rosenthal, examines lessons learned from the past two decades of conflict and the role that ethical action must play in helping to provide security while adhering to democratic principles. National security experts N. W. Collins, Sean McFate, and General Joseph Votel share their thoughts on these critical issues.
    09/09/21MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Ethics of Exit from Afghanistan
    08/23/2021
    Carnegie Council President Joel H. Rosenthal discusses the post-9/11 evolution from counterterrorism to counterinsurgency and analyzes the ethics surrounding the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan. He argues that, "if there was an ethical failure by the United States, it was not in the decision to leave. The failure was in its initial execution. In leaving any partnership, it most certainly matters how you do it."
    08/23/21Publications
  • The Doorstep: The Future of Afghanistan Roundtable Discussion, with Ali M Latifi & Said Sabir Ibrahimi
    08/19/2021
    Ali M Latifi, Kabul-based journalist for Al Jazeera English, and Said Sabir Ibrahimi, non-resident fellow with NYU's Center on International Cooperation, join "Doorstep" co-hosts Nick Gvosdev and Tatiana Serafin to discuss what is happening on the ground in Afghanistan and the expectations for the country's future. Will the promises of a Taliban 2.0 in 2021 differ from the 1990s? Can the country recover economically to meet the needs of a new younger generation? What is the responsibility of the international community? "The Doorstep" gets behind the scenes of the current media reporting.
    08/19/21MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Review: Ending the Afghanistan War, with Jonathan Cristol
    05/11/2021
    Jonathan Cristol, author of "The United States and the Taliban before and after 9/11," discusses ethics and the withdrawal of U.S. troops from Afghanistan in the latest in a series of talks with host Alex Woodson. Is President Biden making the correct choice? What does it mean for the U.S. to end the Afghanistan War "honorably"? What are the prospects for women's rights after the withdrawal?
    05/11/21MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Peace By Poison: How the Coronavirus Could Fix Globalization Problems
    03/14/2020
    How is the COVID-19 pandemic stress-testing the international system? Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev writes that the virus is accelerating a series of disintegrative processes, which could end up ushering in the long-awaited post–Cold War world. This article was first published on March 14, 2020 and an excerpt was reprinted with the kind permission of "The National Interest."
    03/14/20Publications
  • What Do Americans Think . . .
    03/09/2020
    The U.S. Global Engagement program at Carnegie Council has been conducting a survey of attitudes about U.S. foreign policy with an eye to understanding where Americans are prepared to accept risks or prioritize tradeoffs with competing clusters of values and interests. Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev reviews some of the preliminary results.
    03/09/20Publications
  • Just War, Unjust Soldiers, & American Public Opinion, with Scott D. Sagan
    01/27/2020
    Do soldiers fighting for a "just cause" have more rights than soldiers fighting on the other side? In this interview following up on an "Ethics & International Affairs" article, Stanford's Professor Scott D. Sagan discusses the results of a study he conducted with Dartmouth's Professor Benjamin A. Valentino on how Americans think about this profound question.
    01/27/20MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Vox Populi, Eurasia Group Foundation, and Narratives
    12/10/2019
    The Eurasia Group Foundation (EGF) has released its report on public attitudes towards U.S. foreign policy. Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev notes that, like the project on U.S. Global Engagement at the Carnegie Council, EGF is attempting to get at the twin issues of "the chasm which exists between the interests and concerns of foreign policy elites and those of ordinary citizens" and "the reasons why Americans are increasingly disenfranchised from foreign policy decisions being made in Washington."
    12/10/19Publications
  • The End of the U.S.-Taliban Talks? with Jonathan Cristol
    09/18/2019
    Despite progress over the last year, Donald Trump effectively ended the latest round of U.S.-Taliban negotiations with a tweet earlier this month. Will talks continue in a more understated way? Does this change anything on the ground in Afghanistan? And what is the Taliban doing in Moscow? Jonathan Cristol, author of "The United States and the Taliban before and after 9/11," discusses all this and more.
    09/18/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Ethics & International Affairs Volume 33.3 (Fall 2019)
    09/10/2019
    The highlight of the Fall 2019 issue of "Ethics & International Affairs" is a roundtable on "Economic Sanctions and Their Consequences." Other topics include human rights and conflict resolution, Afghan attitudes toward civilian wartime harm, the role of supererogation on the battlefield, and the ethics of not-so-civil resistance.
    09/10/19Publications
  • Just Out: "Ethics & International Affairs" Fall 2019 Issue
    09/10/2019
    The highlight of the Fall 2019 issue of "Ethics & International Affairs" is a roundtable on "Economic Sanctions and Their Consequences." Other topics include human rights and conflict resolution, Afghan attitudes toward civilian wartime harm, the role of supererogation on the battlefield, and the ethics of not-so-civil resistance.
    09/10/19NewsPress Releases
  • Prioritizing the Linkages Between Sustainable Development Goals to Eradicate Child Marriage
    08/08/2019
    "Child marriage is both a cause and consequence of the other societal ills outlined in the UN's Sustainable Development Goals," writes human rights attorney Megan E. Corrado. This connection is especially stark in states like Afghanistan, which face instability due to conflict. What can governments and civil society do to help children in need? What are some grassroots approaches?
    08/08/19Publications
  • Immigration: A National Security Imperative
    05/13/2019
    "The U.S. intelligence community is dependent on immigration to maintain language and cultural skills that protect American lives every day," writes military veteran Philip Caruso. "Although the immigration policy debate is often portrayed as a clash of American values, human rights, and pragmatic challenges, any solution must also recognize rational and pragmatic immigration as a national security imperative."
    05/13/19Publications
  • Global Ethics Weekly: The U.S.-Taliban Negotiations, with Jonathan Cristol
    02/21/2019
    Jonathan Cristol, author of "The United States and Taliban before and after 9/11," discusses the status of the latest talks between the U.S. government and the Taliban, in an effort to end the decades-long war in Afghanistan. Are women's rights being addressed? Are neighboring countries' interests being taken into account? And can we trust the Trump administration in this tense geopolitical environment?
    02/21/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: U.S. Defense Policy After Mattis, with Asha Castleberry
    01/09/2019
    National security expert and U.S. Army veteran Asha Castleberry makes sense of a busy and seemingly chaotic time for the Department of Defense in the wake of Secretary Mattis' departure. What should think about Trump's plans in Syria and Afghanistan? How is the U.S. planning to counter China in Africa? And has John Bolton actually been a moderating influence?
    01/09/19MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Global Ethics Weekly: The U.S. & the Taliban Before & After 9/11, with Jonathan Cristol
    11/08/2018
    When most Americans think about the Taliban, their minds go to Osama bin Laden, terrorism, and the endless war in Afghanistan. But as Jonathan Cristol writes in his book, "The United States and Taliban before and after 9/11," there is much more to the story as both sides met countless times in the 1990s, with the Taliban eager to have good relations with America. What was the bigger stumbling block for the U.S.: women's rights or al-Qaeda? What are the lessons for today?
    11/08/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • The Future of U.S. National Security, with Derek Reveron
    10/10/2018
    "Is it still fair to say there are continuities in foreign policy two years into the Trump administration? I'm going to say yes, and I'll offer some evidence," declares Derek S. Reveron of the U.S. Naval War College and Harvard Kennedy School. Don't miss this expert analysis of America's role in the world.
    10/10/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • An Update on Pakistan, with Ahmed Rashid
    10/05/2018
    Acclaimed journalist Ahmed Rashid discusses Pakistan's new populist prime minister, Imran Khan, whom he considers woefully unprepared. He also examines Pakistan's debt-ridden economy and Pakistan's complex relationships with China, India, the U.S., Afghanistan, and the Taliban. "I think the key thing to understand is the need to follow Afghanistan," he says. "Whatever happens in Pakistan will depend on what happens in Afghanistan."
    10/05/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts
  • Making Foreign Policy Relevant Again, with Asha Castleberry & Ali Wyne
    09/25/2018
    Has a gap opened up between the U.S. national security community and the general public over foreign policy? If so, why? How can we close it? Moderated by Nikolas Gvosdev, this panel with foreign policy experts Asha Castleberry and Ali Wyne is part of a larger effort by Carnegie Council's U.S. Global Engagement Program to examine drivers in U.S. politics pushing the United States to disengage from international affairs.
    09/25/18MultimediaAll Audio, Video, Transcripts

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