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A Conversation with Law Professor and Columnist Rosa Brooks on Obama's Foreign Policy | 06/12/14
Rosa Brooks, James Traub
With an insider's perspective, Rosa Brooks candidly discusses U.S. foreign policy, from Kosovo to Afghanistan, Syria, and Ukraine, along with her views on Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. Would Clinton have made a better president? » Studio » All Audio, Video, Transcripts

Syria and the Just Use of Force Short of War | 09/25/13
The Obama administration has spoken of punishing the Assad regime, of deterring future attacks, of reinforcing the norm against chemical weapons use, and of diminishing the regime's military capabilities. Consistently, these threats have been framed in the language of force short of war. How do we judge if such an action is morally justified? » Publications » Articles, Papers, and Reports

"Kant and the End of War: A Critique of Just War Theory" by Howard Williams; and "Kant and Cosmopolitanism: The Philosophical Ideal of World Citizenship" by Pauline Kleingeld | 09/18/13
These new books, by two of the foremost contemporary scholars of Kant's political philosophy, deal extensively with the theme of international peace. » Publications » Ethics & International Affairs » Table of Contents and Excerpt from Ethics & International Affairs, Volume 27.3 (Fall 2013))

"Just War and International Order: The Uncivil Condition in World Politics" | 05/20/13
"A literate and persuasive account in the context of just war and intervention of how reason coupled with good intentions can unwittingly help expand state authority and the use of force at home and abroad."--Richard Ned Lebow, King's College London, on Global Ethics Fellow Nicholas Rengger's new book. » News » Media Mentions

Special Section: Just War and Its Critics | 03/01/13
As we approach our second century, Carnegie Council will remain the home for energetic, rigorous, and creative thinking on the ethics of war. In these pages, we rededicate ourselves to the proposition that the “just war” tradition is an inheritance that requires and rewards constant engagement. » Publications » Ethics & International Affairs » Table of Contents and Excerpt from Ethics & International Affairs Volume 27.1 (Spring 2013) » Table of Contents and Excerpt from Ethics & International Affairs, Volume 27.1 (Spring 2013)

"Ethics & International Affairs" Spring Issue | 02/19/13
This issue features an essay by Shefa Siegel on the missing ethics of mining; a Carnegie Council Centennial special section on "Just War and its Critics," with contributions by James Turner Johnson, Cian O'Driscoll, John Kelsay, and Daniel Brunstetter and Megan Braun; and book reviews by Charli Carpenter and Deen K. Chatterjee. » News » Press Releases

Human Rights Watch: Promoting Ethical Behavior When It's Contested | 11/29/12
Kenneth Roth
It's the job of Human Rights Watch to shine a spotlight on human rights abuses worldwide, including in the U.S., says its executive director Ken Roth. We speak not for the public conscience, but to it, "and if we have hit that conscience accurately, it’s reflected in shame, and governments then have to respond to that." » Studio » All Audio, Video, Transcripts

Jon Quong on Self-Defense | 10/03/12
Jonathan Quong, Christian Barry, Matt Peterson
What conditions make it permissible for one person to kill another? And what does it mean if the theories that we've used as the basis of war turn out to be wrong? Here's Jon Quong of the University of Manchester. » Studio » All Audio, Video, Transcripts

Global Ethics Corner: When Are Drones Strikes Ethical? | 05/04/12
President Obama's top counterterrorism adviser recently defended drone strikes, saying they are legal, wise, and moral. But, citing international law, many critics question this approach, especially in a non-combat zone like Pakistan. Is it ethically problematic to rely on drone strikes? » Studio » All Audio, Video, Transcripts

Global Ethics Corner: When Are Drones Strikes Ethical? | 05/04/12
President Obama's top counterterrorism adviser recently defended drone strikes, saying they are legal, wise, and moral. But, citing international law, many critics question this approach, especially in a non-combat zone like Pakistan. Is it ethically problematic to rely on drone strikes? » Studio » All Audio, Video, Transcripts

Global Ethics Corner: When Are Drones Strikes Ethical? | 05/04/12
President Obama's top counterterrorism adviser recently defended drone strikes, saying they are legal, wise, and moral. But, citing international law, many critics question this approach, especially in a non-combat zone like Pakistan. Is it ethically problematic to rely on drone strikes? » Studio » All Audio, Video, Transcripts

Seth Lazar on Self-Defense in War | 03/16/12
Seth Lazar, Christian Barry, Matt Peterson
Does all killing in war come down to self-defense? This view makes a lot of intuitive sense, but it turns out to pose a serious challenge to the traditional view of just war theory. What about civilians, for example? Philosopher Seth Lazar explores this complex issue. 

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The Implications of Drones on the Just War Tradition [Abstract] | 09/20/11
Daniel Brunstetter, Megan Braun
The aim of this article is to explore how the brief history of drone warfare thus far affects and potentially alters the parameters of ad bellum and in bello just war principles. » Publications » Ethics & International Affairs » Ethics & International Affairs Volume 25.3 (Fall 2011) » Features

The Ethics of Humanitarian Intervention in Libya [Abstract] | 08/12/11
James Pattison
The moral permissibility of the intervention in Libya largely turns on two fairly tricky assessments: whether the situation was sufficiently serious at the time the intervention was launched and what the predominant purposes of the intervention were. » Publications » Ethics & International Affairs » Ethics & International Affairs Volume 25.3 (Fall 2011) » Roundtable: Libya, RtoP, and Humanitarian Intervention

"Leading from Behind": The Responsibility to Protect, the Obama Doctrine, and Humanitarian Intervention after Libya [Abstract] | 08/12/11
Simon Chesterman
The legal significance of Libya is minimal, though the international response does show how the politics of humanitarian intervention has shifted to the point where it is harder to do nothing in the face of atrocities. » Publications » Ethics & International Affairs » Ethics & International Affairs Volume 25.3 (Fall 2011) » Roundtable: Libya, RtoP, and Humanitarian Intervention

RtoP Alive and Well after Libya [Abstract] | 08/12/11
Thomas G. Weiss
If the Libyan intervention goes well, it will put teeth in the fledgling RtoP doctrine. Yet, if it goes badly, critics will redouble their opposition, and future decisions will be made more difficult. Libya suggests that we can say no more Holocausts, Cambodias, and Rwandas--and occasionally mean it. » Publications » Ethics & International Affairs » Ethics & International Affairs Volume 25.3 (Fall 2011) » Roundtable: Libya, RtoP, and Humanitarian Intervention

Civilian Protection in Libya: Putting Coercion and Controversy Back into RtoP [Abstract] | 08/12/11
Jennifer Welsh
While it is unclear how the crisis in Libya will affect the fortunes and trajectory of the principle of the responsibility to protect, Libya will significantly shape the parameters within which the debate over what RtoP entails, and how it might be operationalized, will occur. » Publications » Ethics & International Affairs » Ethics & International Affairs Volume 25.3 (Fall 2011) » Roundtable: Libya, RtoP, and Humanitarian Intervention

How Wars End: Why We Always Fight the Last Battle | 06/08/11
Gideon Rose
Pax Americana is a good thing, declares Gideon Rose. The problem is that even when the U.S. wins militarily, it often botches dealing with war's aftermath because it fails to define its political objectives. » Studio » All Audio, Video, Transcripts

How Wars End: Why We Always Fight the Last Battle | 01/31/11
Gideon Rose
Pax Americana is a good thing, declares Gideon Rose. The problem is that even when the U.S. wins militarily, it often botches dealing with war's aftermath because it fails to define its political objectives. » Studio » All Audio, Video, Transcripts

How Wars End: Why We Always Fight the Last Battle | 01/25/11
Gideon Rose, Joanne J. Myers
Pax Americana is a good thing, declares Gideon Rose. The problem is that even when the U.S. wins militarily, it often botches dealing with war's aftermath because it fails to define its political objectives. » Studio » All Audio, Video, Transcripts

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