People  |   Advanced Search  |   US English US English US English
中文 中文
Español Español
Français Français
Русский Русский

Search Return

Search Results For:
Region "Asia"

Search Again

Page 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38  

Joanne Bauer |
Joanne Bauer is a specialist in environmental issues, human rights, international policy and Asia. She is senior researcher and New York representative for the Business & Human Rights Resource Centre, where she also manages a project on HIV/AIDS. » People

Arief Budiman |
Arief Budiman is Foundation Professor of Indonesian Studies at the Asia Institute, University of Melbourne. » People

Kurt Campbell |
Kurt Campbell is the senor vice president and director of the International Security Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, and holds the Henry Kissinger Chair in National Security. » People

Elizabeth A. Cole |
Elizabeth (Lili) Cole is a senior program officer in the Jennings Randolph Fellowship program at the United States Insitute of Peace (USIP). » People

Robert M. Cutler |
Robert M. Cutler is a fellow at the Institute of European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, Carleton University, Ottawa. » People

Larry Diamond |
Larry Diamond is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution. » People

Tokyo's Ambition Generation | 02/11/16
Devin T. Stewart
Despite a host of cultural and structural difficulties, Japanese business culture is slowly becoming more welcoming to start-ups, writes Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Devin Stewart in "Foreign Affairs." » Publications » Articles, Papers, and Reports

What Does Singapore Owe its Migrant Workers? | 02/10/16
Matthew Sacco
In Tuas View, an industrial neighborhood in Singapore, migrant workers have little reason to leave their buildings. They live in a 15,000 square foot dormitory, where they enjoy fitness centers, movie theaters, food courts, and even a beer garden. Take a closer look, however, and a darker reality emerges. » Publications » Carnegie Ethics Online

Human Rights in Asia and the West | 01/28/16
Jiyoung Song
The geographical, national, or ethnic East-West division in human rights thinking is increasingly irrelevant. Instead, multiple layers of horizontal solidarity have been formed through global networks, and liberals in both regions have been significantly marginalized. » Publications » Articles, Papers, and Reports

Values and the Ethics of International Order | 01/28/16
Jean-Marc Coicaud
At a time when U.S. primacy is in doubt, when many are concerned that China might become a global political power, when the threat of radical Islam goes hand in hand with anti-Western attitudes, the question of the right repertoire of values, along with the legitimacy and ethics of the international order, could not be more important. » Publications » Articles, Papers, and Reports

The "Singapore School" of Asian Values: Down But Not Out? | 01/26/16
See Seng Tan
When the Asian financial crisis of 1997 blunted the so-called "Asian Economic Miracle," critics--many Westerners, but also Asians tired of the tendentious claims of their cultural elites--bid good riddance to the end of "Asian values." Yet the "Singapore school" could well experience a revival in the foreseeable future, albeit in a different form. » Publications » Articles, Papers, and Reports

The Reduction of Mass Atrocity Crimes in Southeast Asia, the Responsibility to Protect (R2P), and the Individual Responsibility to Protect (IR2P) | 01/22/16
David Frank
For a variety of reasons, Southeast Asia has experienced a significant reduction in mass atrocity crimes in the last 30 years. Frank suggests that R2P and the individual responsibility to protect (IR2P, advanced by Edward Luck and Dana Luck), when yoked, can help entrench, sustain, and strengthen norms that help prevent mass atrocity crimes. » Publications » Articles, Papers, and Reports

Rethinking U.S. Strategy Towards China | 01/21/16
Joshua Eisenman
"To improve U.S. policy towards China to avoid, and yet be prepared for, conflict requires going beyond simplistic applications of international relations theory. It means opening the 'black box' of China's policymaking process to understand why it makes the decisions it does and how this process has and is changing." » Publications » Articles, Papers, and Reports

Sujata Gadkar-Wilcox Discusses the Indian Constitution | 01/15/16
Sujata Gadkar-Wilcox, Alex Woodson
Quinnipiac professor Sujata Gadkar-Wilcox recently spent three months researching the Indian Constitution in Delhi. In this talk, she details the document's framework, its main architect B. R. Ambedkar, and why it is the world's longest constitution. Is it revered, like its American counterpart? What are some of the constitutional debates in India today? » Multimedia » All Audio, Video, Transcripts

Sujata Gadkar-Wilcox Discusses the Indian Constitution | 01/14/16
Sujata Gadkar-Wilcox, Alex Woodson
Quinnipiac professor Sujata Gadkar-Wilcox recently spent three months researching the Indian Constitution in Delhi. In this talk, she details the document's framework, its main architect B. R. Ambedkar, and why it is the world's longest constitution. Is it revered, like its American counterpart? What are some of the constitutional debates in India today? » Multimedia » All Audio, Video, Transcripts

Top Risks and Ethical Decisions 2016 | 01/07/16
Ian Bremmer, Devin T. Stewart
Eurasia Group's Ian Bremmer discusses the top political risks for 2016 and gives a stark warning for the year ahead. Touching on the Saudi-Iranian tensions, China's footprint, and the eroding trans-Atlantic alliance, Bremmer says, "This is very likely to be the most dangerous year of geopolitical risk we have experienced since we started this process." » Multimedia » All Audio, Video, Transcripts

Back to the Future? Battlefield Nuclear Weapons in South Asia | 01/05/16
Jeffrey D. McCausland
In this information-filled talk, Jeff McCausland, a retired U.S. Army colonel, explains why the India/Pakistan border may be the most dangerous place on the planet. With nuclear weapons, a contentious history, and world powers vying for influence, a crisis could easily escalate to a "catastrophic" level. Are there lessons to be learned from the Cold War? » Multimedia » All Audio, Video, Transcripts

Bearing Witness to War and Injustice: Ron Haviv, Photojournalist | 12/21/15
Ron Haviv, Randall Pinkston
From the Balkan Wars to both invasions of Iraq to the current refugee crisis, photojournalist Ron Haviv has been at the center of many of the world's most dangerous conflicts over the last three decades. In this fascinating talk, Haviv walks us through some of his most striking photographs and discusses the complicated ethics of being a journalist in a war zone. » Multimedia » All Audio, Video, Transcripts

Will China Promote Autocracy along its New Silk Road? | 12/14/15
Mark Chou, Octavia Bryant
China's ambitious "One Belt One Road" project is planned to span across Asia, the Middle East, Europe, and Africa. It's estimated that it will affect the lives of 4.4 billion people and generate $2.1 trillion in gross production. Is this the beginning of a sinocentric "New Asian Order"--and would that be such a bad thing? » Publications » Carnegie Ethics Online

"Do Not Forget Us!" (1978) | 12/08/15
Bayard Rustin
Activist Bayard Rustin reports on meeting Indochinese refugees in Thai camps, who fled their countries in fear of their lives. He exhorts America to open its doors and makes a special appeal to his fellow African-Americans, declaring: "Black people must recognize these people for what they are: brothers and sisters, not enemies and competitors." » Publications » From Our Archives: 100 for 100

Search Again

Page 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38  

Online Magazine

Social Network

The Journal

postprandial-ft