Search Return

Search Results For:
Keyword "Europe"

Search Again

Page 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5  

Timothy Garton Ash |
Timothy Garton Ash is professor of European Studies at the University of Oxford. » People

Elazar Barkan |
Elazar Barkan is professor of history & cultural studies at Claremont Graduate University and director of the Institute for Historical Justice and Reconciliation. » People

Christopher Caldwell |
Christopher Caldwell is a journalist and senior editor at The Weekly Standard, as well as a regular contributor to the Financial Times and Slate. » People

Jean De Ruyt |
Jean De Ruyt is the Belgian ambassador to the UN. » People

Kemal Dervis |
Kemal Dervis, Turkish politician and economist, is currently head of the UN Development Program. He has held many positions at the World Bank and taught at Princeton University and Middle East Technical Universites. » People

THE LIVING WAR: World War I in the 21st Century |
Zach Dorfman, Mladen Joksic
This monthly interview series examines World War I and its consequences for the modern world. Featuring scholars, journalists, and other experts, it connects the social fractures, political debates, and policy choices that still resonate in the structure of the international system. » Studio » THE LIVING WAR: World War I in the 21st Century

Ukraine: A Federalist Future? | 04/23/14
Rene Wadlow
One possibility of lowering tensions in Ukraine on a longer-term basis is the start of discussions on a federal-decentralized government structure that would not divide the country but would foster local and regional autonomy. However, although federalism is not a first step to Ukraine's disintegration, neither is it a "magic solution." » Publications » Articles, Papers, and Reports

To End All Wars: Adam Hochschild on World War I | 02/27/14
Adam Hochschild, Mladen Joksic
The consequences of World War I are still with us, says Adam Hochschild. Are we in danger of making the same mistakes again? Why were Europeans so eager to go to war? What happened to those who publicly opposed it? Read the answers to these questions and more in this fascinating interview. » Publications » Articles, Papers, and Reports

The Rise of Extremism in a Disunited Europe | 01/17/14
David C. Speedie, Jennifer Otterson Mollick
A sinister scenario is playing out in Europe: the rise of right-wing populism, and in some cases, extreme far-right forces. Throughout 2013, Carnegie Council's U.S. Global Engagement program tracked these developments and it will be publishing its findings in 2014. This article analyzes the current situation. » Publications » Articles, Papers, and Reports

A Sick Asian Man Goes to Multicultural Europe: A Tale of Modern Citizenship in Transition | 12/04/13
Kei Hiruta
A parable for our times? "As the debate over multiculturalism continues, the societies to which the adjective is applied change in complex ways, as I could glimpse during my trip to Belgium in summer 2013," writes Carnegie Global Ethics Fellow Kei Hiruta. » Publications » Articles, Papers, and Reports

No Ordinary Men: New Book by Former Carnegie Council Trustee Elisabeth Sifton and Historian Fritz Stern | 11/13/13
Very few Germans took the risk of actively opposing Hitler's tyranny and terror, and fewer still did so to protect the sanctity of law and faith. In "No Ordinary Men," Elisabeth Sifton and Fritz Stern focus on two remarkable, courageous men who did: Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Hans von Dohnanyi. » News » Press Releases

The Unsung Hero Who Coined the Term "Genocide" | 09/21/13
In this "The New Republic" piece, Centennial Chair Michael Ignatieff recounts the life of Raphael Lemkin, who coined the term "genocide." A Jewish, Polish law scholar who immigrated to the United States in 1941, Lemkin made it his life's project to "save future generations from the genocidal furies that had claimed his own family." » News » Media Mentions

Review of "Political Philosophy in the Twentieth Century: Authors and Arguments" | 07/01/13
"This collection of essays edited by Catherine Zuckert provides an overview of the work and lives of 18 thinkers who made significant contributions to the development of political philosophy in the last century," writes Kei Hiruta, Carnegie-Uehiro Fellow and Global Ethics Fellow, in this book review in "Philosophy in Review (33:3)." » News » Media Mentions

Years Later, Secular Student Group Recognized On A Religious Campus: Here's How It Happened | 04/11/13
Chris Stedman, Andreas Rekdal
In order to be truly inclusive, interfaith dialogue and collaboration must also include those without faith. » Publications » Articles, Papers, and Reports

Book Review: "The Undivided Past: Humanity Beyond Our Differences" | 04/11/13
Zach Dorfman
"The Undivided Past" aims to show that "the most resonant forms of human solidarity," as author David Cannadine elegantly puts it, are unstable and often ultimately incoherent. In other words, many foundational concepts cannot withstand logical or historical scrutiny. » Publications » Articles, Papers, and Reports

Years Later, Secular Student Group Recognized On A Religious Campus: Here's How It Happened | 04/08/13
In order to be truly inclusive, interfaith dialogue and collaboration must also include those without faith, write communications assistant Andreas Rekdal and interfaith activist Chris Stedman in the "Huffington Post." » News » Media Mentions

Home Alone? | 08/30/12
Kei Hiruta
What is it like to be liberal in East Asia? Is liberalism a specifically Western ideology, or does it embody universal norms? The old dispute is a matter of pressing concern in East Asia, where political leaders repeatedly denounce liberal values for various purposes--from suppressing dissenters to pursuing popular support. » Publications » Articles, Papers, and Reports

George F. Kennan: An American Life | 11/22/11
John Lewis Gaddis, Joanne J. Myers
George Kennan was one of the great men of the 20th century, says John Lewis Gaddis. And he was great in multiple dimensions: as the grand strategist of the Cold War; as a historian; and as author of one of the greatest of American diaries. » Studio » Multimedia

Global Ethics Corner: Debt and Democracy: Why Shouldn't Greeks Vote on Their Financial Future? | 11/11/11
The Greek tragedy unfolding over the European debt deal raises some important questions about the bounds between debt and democracy: Why shouldn't Greeks--or any citizenry for that matter--get to vote on the economic fate of their country? » Studio » Multimedia

Global Ethics Corner: Debt and Democracy: Why Shouldn't Greeks Vote on Their Financial Future? | 11/11/11
The Greek tragedy unfolding over the European debt deal raises some important questions about the bounds between debt and democracy: Why shouldn't Greeks--or any citizenry for that matter--get to vote on the economic fate of their country? » Studio » Multimedia

Search Again

Page 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5  

Online Magazine

Social Network

The Journal