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Steve Coll |
Pulitzer Prize-winner Steve Coll is dean of the Columbia University School of Journalism and a staff writer at The New Yorker. » People

Citizenship, Identity, and Conflict in South Asia's Borderlands | 11/20/14
Suchitra Vijayan, Liana Sterling
India has one of the world's longest land frontiers and each of its borders engenders a different kind of conflict, says Vijayan, who's making a 9,000-mile journey through India's borderlands. So far she's visited Kashmir, and India's borders with Afghanistan, Pakistan, Burma, and China. What has she learned about the effects of borders on human lives? » Studio » All Audio, Video, Transcripts

Political Order and Political Decay: From the Industrial Revolution to the Globalization of Democracy | 10/15/14
Francis Fukuyama
What are the requirements for a liberal democracy? It's not just voting, says Fukuyama. It needs a distinction between public and private interest; rule of law; and accountability. Although the U.S. started off as a weak, corrupt state, it became a liberal democracy. Yet all political systems are subject to decay, and that's what's happening to the U.S. today. » Studio » All Audio, Video, Transcripts

A Conversation with Lieutenant-General Roméo A. Dallaire | 10/02/14
Roméo A. Dallaire, James Traub
In this inspiring conversation, Dallaire talks about his faith in the principle of R2P--"one of the great innovations of our time"--and how to go about actually implementing it; the tragedy of Rwanda; and most of all, his work to prevent the use of child soldiers. » Studio » All Audio, Video, Transcripts

A Conversation with Law Professor and Columnist Rosa Brooks on Obama's Foreign Policy | 06/12/14
Rosa Brooks, James Traub
With an insider's perspective, Rosa Brooks candidly discusses U.S. foreign policy, from Kosovo to Afghanistan, Syria, and Ukraine, along with her views on Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. Would Clinton have made a better president? » Studio » All Audio, Video, Transcripts

Ethics Matter: A Conversation with Sebastian Junger | 03/18/14
Sebastian Junger, James Traub
Journalist Sebastian Junger knows about war from the inside: the horror and pain, the excitement and heightened awareness, and the fierce brotherhood between soldiers. In this moving conversation he talks about his life and work, and ponders on what everyone owes their country, whether they choose to fight or stay home. » Studio » All Audio, Video, Transcripts

"War on Terror," an Insider's View: A Conversation with Harold H. Koh | 02/28/14
Harold Hongju Koh, James Traub
As legal adviser to the State Department from 2009 to 2013, Harold Koh was responsible for making judgments about the most difficult issues in the "war on terror": drone strikes, military tribunals, preventive detention. This fascinating and revealing conversation explores Koh's moral convictions and the inner workings of government. » Studio » All Audio, Video, Transcripts

The Future of American Warfighting: Lessons of the Contemporary Battlefield | 02/27/14
Noah Shachtman, Patrick J. Mahaney, Jr., Ben FitzGerald
What are the ethical and legal questions raised by unmanned aerial vehicles, drones, and surveillance? How do they affect combatants, decision-makers, and civilians? An expert panel explores these crucial issues. » Studio » All Audio, Video, Transcripts

The Fog of Peace: The Human Face of Conflict Resolution | 02/25/14
Giandomenico Picco
The courageous Gianni Picco played a central role in negotiating the Soviet withdrawal from Afghanistan, met with Saddam Hussein to bring an end to the Iran-Iraq War, and traveled to both Beirut and Tehran to rescue 11 hostages and 91 other prisoners. How did he do it? By treating adversaries as individuals, not just government representatives. » Studio » All Audio, Video, Transcripts

Rules of Engagement: The Legal, Ethical and Moral Challenges of the Long War | 02/13/14
Kenneth Anderson, Charles A. Blanchard, Robert Grenier
Can the drone campaign be legally and morally justified? What are the limits to the president's authority when it comes to targeted killing? Don't miss this discussion with Robert Grenier, former CIA counterterrorism director; Charles Blanchard, former general counsel of the U.S. Air Force; and Kenneth Anderson, professor of law at American University. » Studio » All Audio, Video, Transcripts

The Future of Transatlantic Security Cooperation after 2014 | 01/07/14
Brian Hensarling, Marco Overhaus, Adam Jarosz, Matthew Kroenig, Zornitsa Stoyanova-Yerburgh, Thomas A. Walsh
2014 may be a turning point for transatlantic security cooperation. This paper identifies the three most relevant "drivers" in this regard: financial and resource constraints, a turn towards a more inward-looking perspective in EU and NATO capitals, and shifting power relations in the international system. The paper concludes with policy recommendations. » Publications » Articles, Papers, and Reports

Ethics Matter: The Future of War, with Andrew Exum | 12/19/13
Andrew Exum, James Traub
Andrew Exum is a scholar, author, and former U.S. Army officer. In this revealing talk, he describes, in vivid detail, his days leading platoons in Iraq and Afghanistan; insights gained while working at the Pentagon; the successes and failures of America's counterinsurgency efforts; and the growing civilian-military divide, especially in the Northeast. » Studio » All Audio, Video, Transcripts

The Constitution Project: Task Force Report on Detainee Treatment | 11/27/13
David Gushee, David R. Irvine
In many instances, U.S. forces used interrogation techniques which constitute torture; the nation's most senior officials bear ultimate responsibility; and there is no evidence that torture produced significant information of value. These are the unanimous conclusions of the task force on detainee treatment, as discussed here by two of its members. » Studio » All Audio, Video, Transcripts

Important Choices: Foreign Policy and Defense Spending | 10/07/13
Lawrence Korb, David C. Speedie
How much does the U.S. actually spend on defense and where does that money go? Lawrence Korb, an expert on the federal budget, the military, and national security, discusses the tough choices the U.S. needs to make on defense spending; relations with Iran; Syria; NATO; and nuclear weapons. » Studio » All Audio, Video, Transcripts

U.S. Policy on Iran and the Middle East: Where Do We Go From Here? | 09/27/13
Gary Sick, David C. Speedie
Are we on the brink of a new era in Iran-U.S. relations? Maybe. Iran expert Gary Sick discusses President Rouhani's UN speech, which took place just before this event, plus previous missed opportunities and the current possibilities of rapprochement. While condemning the regime, he sees an opening for constructive negotiations. » Studio » All Audio, Video, Transcripts

The Fate of Cultural Property in Wartime: Why it Matters and What Should Be Done | 09/17/13
Jennifer Otterson Mollick
Cultural property protection in conflict is often neglected as people argue that the lives of individuals in warzones are far more important than old buildings, pots, and books. However, it is not a question of prioritizing. We must not dismiss cultural property protection in conflicts as secondary to humanitarian tragedy, but as part of the effort to save humanity. » Publications » Carnegie Ethics Online

Ethics Matter: Jeremy Scahill on the World as a Battlefield | 06/13/13
Jeremy Scahill, Marlene Spoerri
In the name of the "war on terror," the U.S. is conducting covert warfare and targeted killings, and it dismisses the resulting deaths of innocent civilians as "collateral damage." What are the ethical and practical repercussions of these policies? Jeremy Scahill's blistering talk ranges from Iraq to Afghanistan, Yemen, and Somalia. » Studio » All Audio, Video, Transcripts

Foreign Policy Begins at Home: The Case for Putting America's House in Order | 06/06/13
Richard N. Haass
We have been guilty of overreaching abroad and underachieving at home, says Richard Haass, and these sins are really two sides of the national security coin. After all, "our capacity to act abroad is obviously directly limited and affected by the capacities we have created here at home, whether the capacities are military or economic or human." » Studio » All Audio, Video, Transcripts

Afghanistan: What Went Wrong? | 05/24/13
Review essay in "Washington Monthly" by Global Ethics Fellow Roland Paris, based on four books that offer insights into “what went wrong” with the international effort to stabilize Afghanistan after 2001. » News » Media Mentions

Ethics on Film: Discussion of "Zero Dark Thirty" | 03/11/13
A fictional adaptation of the CIA's hunt for Osama bin Laden, this blockbuster has reignited the debate surrounding the CIA's use of "enhanced interrogation techniques." » Education » Course Ideas » Ethics on Film

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