The Crisis of Global Trust and the Failure of the 2005 World Summit [Excerpt]

Ethics & International Affairs, Volume 20.2 (Summer 2006)

Nancy E. Soderberg Nancy E. Soderberg

Certainly, most Americans would say the most significant threat the world faces today is terrorism. As an American, that is the issue of most concern to me. For citizens of developing countries who live in conflict and abject poverty, however, nonproliferation and terrorism are not such important concerns; they care more about peace, and about addressing poverty, HIV/AIDS, and the burden of sovereign debt. And while they are different threats, those faced by the developing world are global too. Whether you are a U.S. citizen worried about being attacked by terrorists armed with nuclear weapons, or a villager in the Congo worried about getting AIDS and about how to provide a better life for your children, the solutions all require other nations’ engagement…

 

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Read More: Security, Development, Aid, Poverty, HIV/AIDS, Global Governance,

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