Ethics & International Affairs, Volume 17.1 (Spring 2003)

Ethics & International Affairs, Volume 17.1

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Editor's Note

Editor's Note: [Full Text] | 03/02/03
Seventeen months after September 11, 2001, the tragic events of that day continue to rattle the foundations of international politics. Whether this will lead to significant changes in our international order remains to be seen.

Roundtable: Evaluating the Preemptive Use of Force

Evaluating the Preemptive Use of Force [Full Text] | 03/02/03
Under what conditions does the existence of risk and uncertainty about possible threats license the use of military force? What consultative procedures should be required in order to legitimate the preventive or preemptive use of force? Author(s): Anthony F. Lang, Jr.

Self-Defense in an Imperfect World [Full Text] | 03/02/03
In his address at West Point on June 1, 2002, President George W. Bush appeared to be signaling America’s willingness to regard the mere possession of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) by potential enemies as grounds for an anticipatory war. Author(s): Chris Brown

Letting the Exception Prove the Rule [Full Text] | 03/02/03
Many of the United States’ allies are reluctant to cooperate with and participate in military actions that cannot be justified under international law - and supportive allies do make the military option easier to pursue. Author(s): Michael Byers

Striking First: A History of Thankfully Lost Opportunities [Full Text] | 03/02/03
Although much of this roundtable focuses on the legal status of preemptive war, international law has rarely, if ever, constrained governments from initiating hostilities. Author(s): Richard K. Betts

Just War, Not Prevention [Full Text] | 03/02/03
Neither prevention nor preemption can have any moral standing in the abstract, since it is the circumstances, not the concepts, that inform their qualities as strategies. The question, rather, is whether the decision to engage in a new war against the Iraqi regime is just. Author(s): Thomas M. Nichols

The Slippery Slope to Preventive War [Full Text] | 03/03/03
The character of potential threats becomes extremely important in evaluating the legitimacy of the new preemption doctrine, and thus the assertion that the United States faces rogue enemies who oppose everything about the United States must be carefully evaluated. Author(s): Neta C. Crawford

Special Section: Achieving Global Economic Justice

Assistance with Fewer Strings Attached [Abstract] | 03/02/03
This article explores the extent to which it is morally defensible to attach good governance conditions to aid and loans in international society, arguing that the use of conditionality should be limited. Author(s): Vivien Collingwood

Holding Intergovernmental Institutions to Account [Abstract] | 03/02/03
How can governments and peoples better hold to account international economic institutions, such as the WTO, the World Bank, and the IMF? This article proposes an approach. Author(s): Ngaire Woods

Developing Just Monetary Arrangements [Abstract] | 03/02/03
International monetary arrangements currently appear to have consequences that are incompatible with a global egalitarian conception of distributive justice. How can we create alternatives? Author(s): Sanjay G. Reddy

Articles

Beyond Coalitions of the Willing: Assessing U.S. Multilateralism [Abstract] | 03/02/03
This article suggests that purely nationalist policies, whether pursued through unilateral or multilateral means, will become increasingly untenable and illegitimate as world politics becomes institutionalized and as humanity becomes integrated, albeit slowly, into a single cosmopolitan community. Author(s): Stewart Patrick

Who Should Get in? The Ethics of Immigration Admissions [Abstract] | 03/02/03
This article explores normative questions about what legal rights settled immigrants should have in liberal democratic states. It argues that liberal democratic justice, properly understood, greatly constrains the distinctions that can be made between citizens and residents. Author(s): Joseph H. Carens

Debate: Israel's Policy of Targeted Killing

Israel's Policy of Targeted Killing [Abstract] | 03/02/03
The policy is consistent with international law because Israel is engaged in armed conflict with terrorists, those targeted are usually killed by conventional military means, and the targets of the attacks are not civilians but combatants. Author(s): Steven R. David

By Any Name Illegal and Immoral: Response to "Israel's Policy of Targeted Killing"[Abstract] | 03/02/03
Armed Palestinians are not combatants according to any known legal definition. They are civilians and can only be attacked for as long as they actively participate in hostilities. Author(s): Yael Stein

If Not Combatants, Certainly Not Civilians [Abstract] | 03/02/03
So long as the Palestinian Authority is incapable or unwilling to halt terrorist attacks, most interpretations of international law, Israeli law, and just war tradition support Israel’s efforts to stop these murderous attacks before they can be carried out. Author(s): Steven R. David

Review Essays

Redefining Sovereignty and Intervention [Full Text] | 03/02/03
The International Commission on Intervention and State Sovereignty's effort to revisit intervention and the lessons of the 1990s have resulted in a conception of intervention as a “responsibility to protect.” But its effort to ensure that past failures are not repeated may go unfulfilled. Author(s): Joelle Tanguy

Fairness, Responsibility, and Climate Change [Full Text] | 03/02/03
Most literature on the ethics of global warming focuses on the obligations of industrialized states to reduce their emissions of greenhouse gases and to help poor countries do likewise. These books are no exception, arguing that the issue is a matter of international justice and equity. Author(s): Paul G. Harris

Preserving the Imbalance of Power [Excerpt] | 03/02/03
The most transparent prevarication in the Bush strategy lies in the assumption that the U.S. is in favor of a balance of power. In fact, the world order that Bush wishes to build looks not toward equilibrium but toward a massive imbalance of power in favor of the U.S. Author(s): David C. Hendrickson

Book Review

Annihilating Difference: The Anthropology of Genocide [Full Text] | 03/01/03
Alexander Laban Hinton, a Cambodia specialist, divides this fine edited collection into five parts: genocide and indigenous peoples; the role of anthropology in National Socialism; three case studies of genocide; instances of post-genocidal reckoning; and “critical reflections” on the chapters.

ADDITIONAL CONTENT



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