Ethics & International Affairs, Volume 16.2 (Fall 2002)

Ethics & International Affairs, Volume 16.2

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Editor's Note

Editor's Note:[Full Text] | 11/25/02
The persistent strength of nonstate actors in world politics makes it necessary to rethink or at least elaborate on the state-centered model of international affairs. If ethics is about choice and responsibility, then who or what entity should be the target of our analysis?

Roundtable: The September 11 Effect

The September 11 Effect [Full Text] | 11/13/02
Since it seems that the leaders of the antiterrorist campaign are scripting their objectives to fit as they go along, the public should be more careful in deciding which policies it wants to support. Author(s): Paige Arthur, Omar Noman, Sima Wali, Robert L. Bach, James D. Ross, Nicolas de Torrenté

Special Section on Health and Global Justice

Access to Medicines and the Rhetoric of Responsibility [Excerpt] | 11/25/02
In Africa fewer than 50,000 people—less than 2 percent of the people in need—currently receive ARV therapy. These facts have elicited strongly divergent reactions, and views about the appropriate response to this crisis have varied widely. Author(s): Christian Barry, Kate Raworth

Health and Global Justice [Full Text] | 11/25/02
In a recent global survey commissioned for the Millennium Summit of the United Nations, people around the world consistently mentioned good health as what they most desired. Author(s): Mira Johri, Christian Barry

International Justice and Health: A Proposal [Excerpt] | 11/25/02
Sreenivasan examines obligations of international distributive justice, arguing that the major seven OECD countries each have an obligation to transfer at least one percent of their GDP to developing countries. Author(s): Gopal Sreenivasan

Personal and Social Responsibility for Health [Excerpt] | 11/25/02
Everyone wants to be healthy, but many of us decline to act in healthy ways. Should these choices have any bearing on the ethics of clinical practice and health policy? How may personal responsibility for health be manipulated in health policy debates. Author(s): Daniel Wikler

Public Health or Clinical Ethics: Thinking beyond Borders [Full Text] | 11/25/02
A normatively adequate public health ethics needs to be anchored in political philosophy rather than in ethics. Its central ethical concerns are likely to include trust and justice, rather than autonomy and informed consent. Author(s): Onora O'Neill

Responsibilities for Poverty-Related Ill Health [Excerpt] | 11/25/02
There is an oft-neglected perspective which the topic of health equity raises: As imposers of the rules, we are inclined to think that harms we inflict through the rules have greater moral weight than like harms we merely fail to prevent or mitigate. Author(s): Thomas Pogge

Debate: Human Rights and the Politics of Victimhood

Human Rights and the Politics of Victimhood [Excerpt] | 11/25/02
Meister argues for a renewal of the politics of victim and beneficiary that avoids moral pitfalls of the revolutionary project. These pitfalls inhere in a politics of victimhood. Author(s): Robert Meister

Human Wrongs and the Tragedy of Victimhood: Response to "Human Rights and the Politics of Victimhood" [Excerpt] | 11/25/02
The problem with the politics of victimhood, as conducted by revolutionaries and counterrevolutionaries engaged in ideological conflict, is that it creates a morally arbitrary hierarchy of victims that can then be used to justify the worst moral transgressions against the "other." Author(s): Catherine Lu

Liberals, Revolutionaries, and Responsibility: Final Rejoinder [Excerpt] | 11/25/02
In the aftermath of violence and oppression, social justice and moral regeneration must begin with institutions of moral accounting, such as trials and truth commissions, that, however imperfectly, revitalize notions of individual, social, and political responsibility. Author(s): Catherine Lu

The Liberalism of Fear and the Counterrevolutionary Project: Reply to Catherine Lu [Excerpt] | 11/25/02
"While Lu invokes Shklar's 'liberalism of fear' as a 'transcendence' of the politics of friend and foe, I regard it as an attempt to give liberalism political purchase by identifying its true foe, those whose political convictions make them insensitive to cruelty, and especially to physical cruelty." Author(s): Robert Meister

Book Reviews

Samantha Power, A Problem from Hell: America and the Age of Genocide | 11/25/02
In her Pulitzer Prize-winning book, Samantha Power reveals with forceful, regretful, and even angry prose, the stark record: the United States has rarely missed an opportunity to miss an opportunity to stand against genocide. Author(s): Samantha Power ADDITIONAL CONTENT



REVIEW ESSAYS

THE THREE WAYS OF GLOBALIZATION:


The Advantage to Trade: Bhagwati and Irwin

Stephen L. S. Smith

The Politics of Economy: Roberto Unger
Samuel Moyn

The Values of the Market: Stiglitz and Soros
Jedediah Purdy

RECENT BOOKS ON ETHICS AND INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS

The Ethics of Destruction: Norms and Force in International Relations, Ward Thomas
REVIEWED BY STEPHEN WATTS

Jihad: The Trail of Political Islam, Gilles Kepel, trans. Anthony F. Roberts
REVIEWED BY SHENAZ BUNGLAWALA

Ethnic Conflict and Civic Life: Hindus and Muslims in India, Ashutosh Varshney
REVIEWED BY KATHARINE ADENEY

Global Justice and Transnational Politics: Essays on the Moral and Political Challenges of Globalization, Pablo De Greiff and Ciaran P. Cronin, eds.
REVIEWED BY JEFFREY LOMONACO

Women, Gender, and Human Rights, Marjorie Agosín, ed.
REVIEWED BY ALYSSA BERNSTEIN

The Courage of Strangers: Coming of Age with the Human Rights Movement, Jeri Laber
REVIEWED BY DAVID PETRASEK

Rethinking Humanitarian Intervention: A Fresh Legal Approach Based on Fundamental Ethical Principles in International Law and World Religions, Brian D. Lepard
REVIEWED BY PETER J. HOFFMAN

Agency and Ethics: The Politics of Military Intervention, Anthony F. Lang, Jr.
REVIEWED BY DANIEL WARNER

Feminist International Relations: An Unfinished Journey, Christine Sylvester
REVIEWED BY KIMBERLY HUTCHINGS

Lincoln's Virtues: An Ethical Biography, William Lee Miller 
REVIEWED BY CATHAL J. NOLAN

Fatal Choice: Nuclear Weapons and the Illusion of Missile Defense, Richard Butler
REVIEWED BY DAVID B.H. DENOON 

RECENT LITERATURE ON SANCTIONS

United States Economic Statecraft for Survival, 1933-1991: Of Sanctions and Strategic Embargoes, Alan P. Dobson

Sanctions and the Search for Security: Challenges to UN Action, David Cortright and George A. Lopez, with Linda Gerber

Smart Sanctions: Targeting Economic Statecraft, David Cortright and George A. Lopez, eds.

United States Economic Sanctions: Theory and Practice, Michael P. Malloy

Economic Warfare: Sanctions, Embargo Busting, and Their Human Cost, R. T. Naylor

Sanctions Beyond Borders: Multinational Corporations and U.S. Economic Statecraft, Kenneth A. Rodman
REVIEWED BY JOY GORDON

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