Ethics & International Affairs, Volume 15.2 (Fall 2001)

Ethics & International Affairs, Volume 15.2

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This issue of our journal went to press before the terrorist attacks of September 11. Nonetheless it raises relevant questions:The notion of "international community": Can it respond to crises? The idea of multiple allegiances, including participation in transnational institutions.
The perils of global economic inequality. In addition, this issue explores: The moral obligation to assist people facing the scourge of HIV/AIDS.Contradictions in positions taken by U.S. environmentalists on global warming.
Articles

Why Inequality Matters: Some Economic Issues [Abstract] | 12/04/01
Many industrialized countries, developing countries, and countries that have recently made the transition from communism to market-oriented economies are characterized by high and increasing income inequality. Author(s): Nancy Birdsall

International Obligation and Human Health: Evolving Policy Responses to HIV/AIDS [Full Text] | 12/04/01
Those with the ability to help can do so without significant sacrifice. Hence, those countries with the means to provide solutions to the HIV/AIDS crisis, and give succor to those now suffering from it, have a moral obligation to act. Author(s): Paul G. Harris, Patricia Siplon

Prospects for Transnational Citizenship and Democracy [Abstract] | 12/04/01
Many of the problems that would be faced in setting up transnational institutions mirror problems that have already been addressed by appropriate institutional mechanisms in the establishment of the modern nation-state. Author(s): Daniel M. Weinstock

Assigning Responsibilities to Institutional Moral Agents: The Case of States and Quasi-States [Abstract] | 12/04/01
To claim that institutions can act as relevant moral agents in international relations, we must consider the disparate circumstances within which states—those that exercise positive sovereignty and those that are sovereign only in name—are expected to act. Author(s): Toni Erskine

Moral Agency and International Society [Abstract] | 12/04/01
Some have argued that the UN or the Security Council can exercise agency on behalf of IS, but in view of the "underinstitutionalization" of IS in the UN, groups of states may authorize themselves to act on the behalf of IS as "coalitions of the willing." Author(s): Chris Brown

The Anti-Sweatshop Movement: Constructing Corporate Moral Agency in the Global Apparel Industry [Abstract] | 12/04/01
Through the use of rhetoric linking private economic transactions and international labor and human rights standards, the movement has successfully challenged corporate practices that were previously considered unremarkable. Author(s): Rebecca DeWinter

Place-Based Environmentalism and Global Warming: Conceptual Contradictions of American Environmentalism [Full Text] | 12/13/01
Although American environmentalism has had considerable success in addressing threats to particular places and resources, this well-organized and enormously popular social movement has not resulted in effective action on the problem of global warming. Author(s): Daniel Somers Smith

Book Reviews

The Global Covenant: Human Conduct in a World of States, Robert H. Jackson [Full Text] | 11/06/01
The strength of Jackson's study lies in his use of military and diplomatic history, legal-institutional scholarship, and political theory to expose the empirical reality and normative logic of a societas of states. Author(s): Catherine Lu

"Unspeakable Truths: Confronting State Terror and Atrocity", Priscilla B. Hayner; "Transitional Justice", Ruti G. Teitel [Full Text] | 11/06/01
Both authors describe the variety of tools - national and international trials, investigatory bodies, memorials, reparations, and constitutional changes - that societies and international bodies have employed to address human rights violations. Author(s): David A. Crocker

War Stories: The Search for a Usable Past in the Federal Republic of Germany, Robert G. Moeller [Full Text] | 11/19/01
Moeller clearly states that this is a book about the popular representation of the war's effect on Germany and the way that this representation shaped a selective memory of suffering in which German victimhood was the overarching theme. Author(s): Rebecca E. Wittmann

ADDITIONAL CONTENT



REVIEW ESSAY

Rethinking Refugees and Immigration
Jeffrey Lomonaco

RECENT BOOKS ON ETHICS AND INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS

Michael Walzer on War and Justice, Brian Orend 
REVIEWED BY DAVID MAPEL

Hans J. Morgenthau: An Intellectual Biography, Christoph Frei
REVIEWED BY GREGORY T. RUSSELL

The Tragedy of Russia’s Reforms: Market Bolshevism against Democracy, Peter Reddaway and Dmitri Glinski
REVIEWED BY IAN BREMMER

Environmentalism Unbound: Exploring New Pathways for Change, Robert Gottlieb
REVIEWED BY JOHN MARTIN GILLROY

The Mobilization of Shame: A World View of Human Rights, Robert F. Drinan, S. J.
REVIEWED BY JOANNE R. BAUER

A World Made New: Eleanor Roosevelt and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Mary Ann Glendon
REVIEWED BY JAY WINTER

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