Ethics & International Affairs, Volume 11 (1997)

Ethics & International Affairs, Volume 11

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Special Section: Twenty Years of Michael Walzer's Just and Unjust Wars

Just and Unjust Wars Revisited (Introduction) | 12/04/97
As the following papers demonstrate, Michael Walzer’s Just and Unjust Wars continues to provoke thought and debate two decades after its publication. The book remains widely taught in college courses and is cited whenever the morality of war is discussed. Author(s): Terry Nardin

Growing Up With Just and Unjust Wars: An Appreciation [Abstract] | 12/04/97
Smith provides a summary of Walzer's work, with particular emphasis on his method of moral argument. Walzer's argument emphasizes the importance of moral judgment based on the principle of human rights rather than on utilitarian calculation. Author(s): Michael J. Smith

In Defense of Realism: A Commentary on Just and Unjust Wars [Abstract] | 12/04/97
Hendrickson takes issue with Walzer's treatment of intervention, self-determination, and the legitimate aims of war, stating that Walzer's framework is permissive and ambiguous and using such a just war theory may lead to significant problems. Author(s): David C. Hendrickson

Noncombatant Immunity in Michael Walzer's Just and Unjust Wars [Abstract] | 12/04/97
Issues of immunity from attack and the assignment of responsibility for civilian deaths are central to the modern war convention. Koontz addresses several difficulties with Walzer's treatment of noncombatant immunity in Just and Unjust Wars. Author(s): Theodore J. Koontz

Just and Unjust Wars: Casuistry and the Boundaries of the Moral World [Abstract] | 12/04/97
Joseph Boyle discusses deontology, which derives precepts from moral principles, particularly making a case with reference to Alan Donagan's The Theory of Morality, which appeared the same year as Just and Unjust Wars. Author(s): Joseph Boyle

A Response [Abstract] | 12/04/97
Responding to the critiques of the four previous authors, Walzer opens with a statement of the inherent imperfection of any theory of war. He reminds us that theories are merely frameworks for decisions and cannot provide answers in and of themselves. Author(s): Michael Walzer

The Politics of Rescue

The Politics of Rescue: Yugoslavia's Wars and the Humanitarian Impulse [Abstract] | 12/04/97
Asserting that humanitarian intervention is a highly ambiguous principle, Pasic and Weiss warn of the dangers of politically driven rescues that often force trade-offs between the pursuit of rescue and political order. Author(s): Amir Pasic, Thomas G. Weiss

NGOs and the Humanitarian Impulse: Some Have It Right [Abstract] | 12/04/97
In a response to Pasic and Weiss, Natsios supports the authors' critique of the unintended political consequences of relief interventions but takes issue with their portrayal of the International Committee of the Red Cross, asserting that the authors misrepresent the doctrine of the ICRC. Author(s): Andrew S. Natsios

An Emergency Response System for the International Community: Commentary on The Politics of Rescue [Abstract] | 12/04/97
In his response to "The Politics of Rescue," Winston argues that the real dilemma facing the international system is not a question of what form intervention will take, but rather a question of the existence of political will to act on the humanitarian impulse. Author(s): Morton Winston

Holding Humanitarianism Hostage: The Politics of Rescue [Abstract] | 12/04/97
Destexhe expands upon the discussion begun in " The Politics of Rescue," stating that the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, in choosing a humanitarian route rather than a political one, further enabled ethnic cleansing and prolonged the conflict in the Balkans. Author(s): Alain Destexhe

When is it Right to Rescue? A Response to Pasic and Weiss [Abstract] | 12/04/97
Arguing that humanitarian agencies cannot always actively pursue political agendas, Mapel argues that in deciding whether there is an obligation to intervene, the nature of the conflict, the costs and risks of intervention, and other factors must all be taken into consideration. Author(s): David R. Mapel

Articles

Tribe, Nation, World: Self-Identification in the Evolving International System [Abstract] | 12/04/97
Appeals to nationalism based on a common sociocultural, geographic, and linguistic heritage are reactions against expansions of trade, information, and power - and anomie and xenophobia can be countered by giving substatal ethnicities, minorities and political parties a voice and a vote. Author(s): Thomas M. Franck

Modernity and Minority Nationalism: Commentary on Thomas Franck [Abstract] | 12/04/97
Kymlicka asserts that Franck overstates the dichotomy of so-called romantic tribal nationalism and traditional nationalism as seen in the United States and France, which Franck claims is liberal, inclusive, and based on political principles rather than blood lines. Author(s): Will Kymlicka

Continuing the Conversation on Chinese Human Rights [Abstract] | 12/04/97
Discussing the history of universal human rights and Confucian values, Ames asserts that a growing dialogue between China and the United States would benefit China in terms of political and individual rights and the United States in terms of a greater sense of civic virtue. Author(s): Roger T. Ames

Conversing with Straw Men While Ignoring Dictators: A Reply to Roger Ames [Abstract] | 12/04/97
Donnelly asserts that Ames has misrepresented his arguments, creating a straw man from Ames's own preconceived notion of the Western liberal tradition while ignoring the substantive debates. Author(s): Jack Donnelly

Reconstructing Rawls's "Law of Peoples" [Abstract | 12/04/97
Paden finds Rawls's new theory inadequate in its response to communitarian criticisms advocating a different theory of good than that of liberal societies. Paden goes back to "A Theory of Justice" to state that all societies seek one good - the protection of their just institutions. Author(s): Roger Paden

State Prerogatives, Civil Society, and Liberalization: The Paradoxes of the Late Twentieth Century in the Third World [Abstract] | 12/04/97
Monshipouri examines three paradoxes in the conflict between the legal-political global order and the growth of civil society in the international system: state-building vs. democratization; economic liberalization vs. political liberalization; and human rights vs. state sovereignty. Author(s): Mahmood Monshipouri

Hans Morgenthau's Realism and American Foreign Policy [Abstract] | 12/04/97
Analyzing Morgenthau's Politics Among Nations, Myers provides a point-by-point discussion of his theory, concluding that the relevance of realism will be seen particularly in the search for a new balance of power in the post-Cold War world. Author(s): Robert J. Myers

The United States and the Genocide Convention: Leading Advocate and Leading Obstacle [Abstract] | 12/04/97
Korey provides a description of the long struggle for ratification of the Genocide Convention, detailing decades of work by a committee of fifty-two nongovernmental organizations lobbying the Senate and the American Bar Association, the treaty's key opponent. Author(s): William Korey

ADDITIONAL CONTENT



RECENT BOOKS ON ETHICS AND INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS

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Ethics in International Relations: A Constitutive Theory, Mervyn Frost

The Twenty-First Century and Questions of Ethics and War
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Legal and Moral Considerations on Low-Intensity Conflict, Alberto R. Coll, James S. Ord, and Stephen A. Rose

Ballistic Missile Defense in the Post-Cold War Era, David B.H. Denoon

Conscience at War: The Israeli Soldier as a Moral Critic, Ruth Linn

An Encyclopedia of War and Ethics, Donald A. Wells, ed.

Ralph Peters, Karl W. Eikenberry, Harvey M. Sapolsky, and Jeremy Shapiro, "Values, Assumptions, and Policies," Parameters (Summer 1996)

Media and Foreign Policy: Intervening in Humanitarian Crises
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International News and Foreign Correspondents, Stephen Hess

The News Media, Civil War, and Humanitarian Action, Larry Minear, Colin Scott, and Thomas G. Weiss

From Massacres to Genocide: The Media, Public Policy, and Humanitarian Crises, Robert I. Rotberg and Thomas G. Weiss, eds.

Challenging Rational Explanations of Genocidal Killing and Altruism
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Hitler's Willing Executioners: Ordinary Germans and the Holocaust, Daniel J. Goldhagen

Revolution and Genocide: On the Origins of the Armenian Genocide and the Holocaust, Robert Melson

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Building Peace: Ethics and Postwar Settlements
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An Ethic for Enemies: Forgiveness in Politics, Donald Shriver

Nurturing Peace: Why Peace Settlements Succeed or Fail, Fen Osler Hampson

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Ethics and International Business, Thomas Donaldson

Competing with Integrity in International Business, Richard DeGeorge

An Ethic of Responsibility in International Relations, Daniel Warner
REVIEWED BY MARK NEUFELD

Schools of Thought in International Relations: Interpreters, Issues, and Morality, Kenneth W. Thompson
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Justice as Impartiality, Brian Barry
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Taking Suffering Seriously: The Importance of Collective Human Rights, William Felice
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Postcommunism: Four Perspectives, Michael Mandelbaum, ed.
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Conscience and Power: An Examination of Dirty Hands and Political Leadership, Stephen Garrett
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This Time We Knew: Western Responses to Genocide in Bosnia, Thomas Cushman and Stjepan Mestrovic, eds.
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Managing Global Chaos, Chester A. Crocker and Fen Osler Hampson, eds.
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Economic Sanctions: Panacea or Peacebuilding, David Cortright and George A. Lopez, eds.
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Humanitarian Intervention: Just War vs. Pacificism, Robert Phillips and Duane Cady
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Historical Dictionary of Multinational Peacekeeping, Terry M. Mays, ed.
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United Nations Blue Book Series
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Transitional Justice: How Emerging Democracies Reckon with Former Regimes, Neil J. Kritz, ed.
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The Haunted Land: Facing Europe's Ghosts After Communism, Tina Rosenberg
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Fair Division, From Cake-Cutting to Dispute Resolution, Steven J. Brams and Alan D. Taylor
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Preventing Violent Conflicts: A Strategy for Preventive Diplomacy, Michael S. Lund
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Profits & Morality, Robin Cowan and Mario J. Rizzo, eds.
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Temptations of a Superpower, Ronald Steel
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The Clash with Distant Cultures: Values, Interests, and Force in American Foreign Policy, Richard J. Payne
REVIEWED BY WILLIAM K. MOONEY, JR.

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