Inhibiting Reliance on Biological Weaponry: The Role and Relevance of International Law [Abstract]

Ethics & International Affairs, Volume 3 (1989)

This article describes the restraints on biological weapons, as dictated in the 1925 Geneva Protocol and the Biological Weapons Convention, and the weaknesses of these instruments. Falk clearly argues for nonpossession as a requirement of international stability. He points out that their commitment to unconditional renunciation has been disregarded by the United States and the Soviet Union. The author concludes that the failure of major powers to comply with the rules they themselves set has encouraged emulation by the rest of the world. It is the duty of those with extensive knowledge of this weaponry to eliminate the pressure for its development.

 

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Read More: Warfare, Armed ConflictInternational Law,

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