Fear and Prejudice in U.S.-Japan Relations [Abstract]

Ethics & International Affairs, Volume 3 (1989)

At the time of writing, Dower observed mounting tension in U.S.-Japan relations. He identified two factors as contributing to mutual fear: differences in capitalism on national and international levels, and stereotypical perceptions based on racial phobias. The author describes major characteristics inducing pessimism based on rational fears concerning economic well-being, national pride, and "cultural values." While densely intertwined economically, financially, militarily, and personally, both actors' abiding suspicion of one another has created a sense of impending crisis.

 

To read or purchase the full text of this article, click here.

Read More: Development, Development, EconomicsInternational Relations, , Japan, United States

blog comments powered by Disqus
Search Our Site

People  |  Advanced Search

In this Issue of the Journal
Join our Mailing Lists
Online Magazine

Online Magazine

Social Network

Social Network

The Journal

The Journal