Superpower Ethics: A Third World Perspective [Abstract]

Ethics & International Affairs, Volume 1 (1987)

At odds in 1987 were the philosophies of a United States grounded in political liberalism and a Soviet Union grounded in economic redistribution. While these principles may have defined these two nations' domestic policies and official international stances, Mazrui argues that the United States did little to propagate liberalism and the Soviet Union did little to encourage economic redistribution. Moreover, his critique seeks to reveal that each superpower's actions ultimately supported the other's philosophy. From this twist of intent and effect, Mazrui turns to the proclivity toward violence that the United States and the Soviet Union displayed in international affairs. Consequently, he calls into question the ethical justification of the means by which the superpowers repeatedly failed to accomplish their intended ends.

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Read More: Ethics, Europe, Security, Ethics, International Relations, Preventive War, U.S. Foreign Policy, Europe, North America, Russia, United States

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